Global Business Management / IB BS

Prepare your mindset for global management, finance and marketing! The four-year undergraduate Global Business Management program, delivered in Zagreb, provides students with knowledge and understanding of the main economic functions of international business and of international strategic management. 

83.5%

Outcome Rate of RIT Croatia graduates who have entered the workforce and/or have continued studies.

800

working hours of co-op minimum 

AACSB

AACSB accredited, the longest serving global association dedicated to advancing management education worldwide, accredits 786 of the world’s best business schools across 53 countries and territories. 

Overview

Through theoretical knowledge and co-op and internship placements, students are prepared for the complexity of problem solving in the dynamic global market. The following courses are of key importance: Global Marketing, Global Entry and Competition Strategies, and Finance in Global Environment. The program offers a special insight into the global business environment along with a political, legal, economic and technological context of international business. Students learn how to take local business globally and develop business strategies that will work on markets of different cultural, political and economic environments. 

All classes are conducted in English. In addition to advanced business English, students learn another foreign language and can choose from German, Italian, Spanish, or French.  

View the detailed Program Delivery Plan

Upon completion of your third year of studying, you will be offered three different program areas to choose from: 

  • Marketing 
  • Finance 
  • Management 

Acquired Skill Set

You will develop the following set of skills and become proficient in: 

  • manage small and medium enterprises, 
  • manage and organize various organizations and their parts, 
  • successfully manage international projects (international management), 
  • plan and execute business plans and strategies for the global market, 
  • manage finances and accounting on the global market, 
  • develop and design products and services, and initiate their launch to the global market, 
  • develop and implement marketing plans for the global market, 
  • apply information technology in business processes, 
  • apply micro and macroeconomics principles in doing business, 
  • make decisions based on statistical data analysis, 
  • understand global business problems, risks, and challenges that companies in a global market face. 

Choose a minor and expand your knowledge about area of your interest

American higher education system enables students to choose a minor. It is a related set of academic courses that enables students to expand their knowledge; for example you can choose a Psychology minor and combine it with the business courses. 

Benefits of having a minor are multiple; from being visible on university transcript, to enabling a student to develop another area of professional expertise or personal interest and showcase depth in more than one discipline. 

You can find out more about minors available for the GBM program.

Careers and Cooperative Education

Typical Job Titles 

Account and Brand Manager Business Development Manager
Consultant Project Manager
Marketing Manager Executive Director

 

Minimum 800 hours of work experience 

What’s different about an RIT Croatia education? It’s the career experience you gain by completing cooperative education with top companies in every single industry. You’ll earn more than a degree. You’ll gain real-world career experience that sets you apart. 

The program is focused on hands-on experience from Day 1; therefore students are required to complete minimum 800 hours of cooperative education (co-op) or internship placements. This hands-on experience provides students with a valuable professional experience and gives them a competitive advantage in launching their careers. Students work for local and international renowned companies learning about service management from the best.  

Co-op is usually completed in the summer following the freshman and sophomore years. Co-op is planned, monitored, and evaluated by the student, the co-op counselor, and the employing firm. 

Curriculum

IB Curriculum

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
ACCT-110
Financial Accounting
An introduction to the way in which corporations report their financial performance to interested stakeholders such as investors and creditors. Coverage of the accounting cycle, generally accepted accounting principles, and analytical tools help students become informed users of financial statements. (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Maymester).
3
ACCT-210
Management Accounting
Introduction to the use of accounting information by managers within a business. Explores the value of accounting information for the planning and controlling of operations, assessing the cost of a product/service, evaluating the performance of managers, and strategic decision-making. (Prerequisites: ACCT-110) Lecture 3 (Spring, Maymester).
3
ECON-101
General Education,Global Perspective: Principles of Microeconomics
Microeconomics studies the workings of individual markets. That is, it examines the interaction of the demanders of goods and services with the suppliers of those goods and services. It explores how the behavior of consumers (demanders), the behavior of producers (suppliers), and the level of market competition influence market outcomes. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ECON-201
General Education,Elective: Principles of Macroeconomics
Macroeconomics studies aggregate economic behavior. The course begins by presenting the production possibilities model. This is followed by a discussion of basic macroeconomic concepts including inflation, unemployment, and economic growth and fluctuations. The next topic is national income accounting, which is the measurement of macroeconomic variables. The latter part of the course focuses on the development of one or more macroeconomic models, a discussion of the role of money in the macroeconomy, the aggregate supply-aggregate demand framework, and other topics the individual instructor may choose. (Prerequisites: ECON-101) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
MGIS-101
Computer-based Analysis
This course provides students with hands-on experience with the analytical software tools and techniques that are used in today's businesses. Emphasis will be placed on the application of spreadsheet models for supporting management decision-making. A variety of spreadsheet-based cases in market research, financial analysis, accounting applications and other business domains will be utilized to show how to effectively analyze and solve business problems using the spreadsheet tool.
1
MGMT-101
Business 1: Introduction to Business Communication, Planning & Analysis
This is the first of a two-course sequence, 4 credit year long experience, comprising the freshman-integrated experience. In Business 1, students will be introduced to the key functional areas of business, discuss current factors, events, and trends that impact business, build professional, personal leadership, communication, and teamwork skills, and evaluate business decisions, and the business plan process. By understanding the key functions of business and analyzing business decisions in Business 1, students will be able to then develop their own business ideas in Business 2.Co-requisite: MGIS-101 or equivalent course).
3
MGMT-102
Business 2: Business Planning and Professional Development
This course, the second course in the First-year Business Sequence, applies technology tools to create well defined and complete business plans. Students will develop websites and other marketing and process tools to take their business concept outlined in Business 1 to a final business plan for review with an outside board. (Prerequisites: MGMT-101 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
UWRT-100
General Education Elective: Critical Reading and Writing
This course is designed to help students develop the literacy practices they will need to be successful in their First-Year Writing course. Students will read, understand, interpret, and synthesize a variety of texts. Assignments are designed to challenge students intellectually, culturally and rhetorically. Through inquiry-based assignment sequences, students will improve their writing by developing academic research and literacy practices that will be further strengthened in First-Year Writing. Particular attention will be given to critical reading, academic writing conventions, and revision. Small class size promotes frequent student-instructor and student-student interaction. The course also emphasizes the principles of intellectual property and academic integrity in academic writing.
3
MATH-101
General Education - Elective - College Algebra
This course provides the background for an introductory level, non-trigonometry based calculus course. The topics include a review of the fundamentals of algebra: solutions of linear, fractional, and quadratic equations, functions and their graphs, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and rational functions, and systems of linear equations. Lecture 3 (Fall)
3
MATH-161
Applied Calculus
This course is an introduction to the study of differential and integral calculus, including the study of functions and graphs, limits, continuity, the derivative, derivative formulas, applications of derivatives, the definite integral, the fundamental theorem of calculus, basic techniques of integral approximation, exponential and logarithmic functions, basic techniques of integration, an introduction to differential equations, and geometric series. Applications in business, management sciences, and life sciences will be included with an emphasis on manipulative skills. Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH-101, MATH-111, MATH-131, NMTH-260, NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or Math Placement Exam score greater than or equal to 45.
4
ENVS-150
General education Elecive;Natural Science Inquiry Perspective; Scientific Principles Perspective;Science / Math Literacy: Ecology of the Dalmatian Coast
This course is an introduction to population, community, and ecosystem ecology; stressing the dynamic interrelationships of plant and animal communities of the Dalmatian Coast. The course includes such ecological concepts as energy flow and trophic levels in natural communities, population and community dynamics, biogeography and ecosystem ecology. Field trips to local Croatian ecosystems are included.
4
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connection
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
Second Year
MKTG-230
Principles of Marketing
An introduction to the field of marketing, stressing its role in the organization and society. Emphasis is on determining customer needs and wants and how the marketer can satisfy those needs through the controllable marketing variables of product, price, promotion and distribution. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 3, (Fall).
3
MGIS-130
Information Systems & Technology
To be successful in our globally-networked business environment, contemporary management professionals must have a strong grounding in the principles of information and information technology. This course provides an introduction to the field of management information systems (MIS), including the tools and techniques for managing information and information technologies within organizations. We place a particular emphasis on the nature of systems, the role of information in business processes, the management of data, and the planning of MIS design projects. Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
INTB-225
General Education,Elective: Global Business Environment
Being an informed global citizen requires an understanding of the global business environment. Organizations critical to the development of the global business environment include for-profit businesses, non-profits, governmental, non-governmental, and supranational agencies. This course introduces students to the interdependent relationships between organizations and the global business environment. A holistic approach is used to examine the diverse economic, political, legal, cultural, and financial systems that influence both organizations and the global business environment. (This course is available to RIT degree-seeking undergraduate students. Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
STAT-145
General Education,Mathematical Perspective A: Introduction to Statistics I
This course introduces statistical methods of extracting meaning from data, and basic inferential statistics. Topics covered include data and data integrity, exploratory data analysis, data visualization, numeric summary measures, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. The emphasis of the course is on statistical thinking rather than computation. Statistical software is used. (Prerequisite: MATH-101.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Maymester).
3
STAT-146
General Education,Mathematical Perspective B: Introduction to Statistics II
This course is an elementary introduction to the topics of regression and analysis of variance. The statistical software package Minitab will be used to reinforce these techniques. The focus of this course is on business applications. This is a general introductory statistics course and is intended for a broad range of programs. (Prerequisites: STAT-145 or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Spring, Summer).
4
MGMT-035
Careers in Business
This course consists of a series of workshops designed to introduce business students to the skills needed to be successful in job and coop searches and applications to graduate schools. Students will establish their career goals, create material (e.g., resume, cover letter), and acquire skills needed to achieve these goals. (AL2,3,4-DegS) Lecture 15 (Fall).
0
FINC-220
Financial Management
Basic course in financial management. Covers business organization, time value of money, valuation of securities, capital budgeting decision rules, risk-return relation, Capital Asset Pricing Model, financial ratios, global finance, and working capital management. Prerequisites: (ECON-101 or ECON-201) and ACCT-110 and (STAT-145 or STAT-251 or CQAS-251 or MATH-251 or MATH-252 or STAT-205).
3
MGMT-215
Organizational Behavior
As an introductory course in managing and leading organizations, this course provides an overview of human behavior in organizations at the individual, group, and organizational level with an emphasis on enhancing organizational effectiveness. Topics include individual differences, work teams, motivation, communication, leadership, conflict resolution, organizational culture, and organizational change. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
UWRT-150
General Education Elective; Writing Intensive: FYW: Writing Seminar
Writing Seminar is a three-credit course limited to 19 students per section. The course is designed to develop first-year students’ proficiency in analytical and rhetorical reading and writing, and critical thinking. Students will read, understand, and interpret a variety of non-fiction texts representing different cultural perspectives and/or academic disciplines. These texts are designed to challenge students intellectually and to stimulate their writing for a variety of contexts and purposes. Through inquiry-based assignment sequences, students will develop academic research and literacy practices that will be further strengthened throughout their academic careers. Particular attention will be given to the writing process, including an emphasis on teacher-student conferencing, critical self-assessment, class discussion, peer review, formal and informal writing, research, and revision. Small class size promotes frequent student-instructor and student-student interaction. The course also emphasizes the principles of intellectual property and academic integrity for both current academic and future professional writing.
3
General Education - Foreign Languages (choose one language) 8
MLSP-201
A: Beginning Spanish I
Beginning Spanish IA is for true beginners of Spanish: those who have never studied the language or have very little recollection of it (the latter as acknowledged by placement test results). This course introduces the Spanish language and the culture of Hispanic countries to beginners, and provides a basic foundation in all skills in Spanish (speaking, listening, reading, writing, culture) through intensive practice in a variety of media. Language work progresses from autobiographical information, through the present tense, to preliminary work in the past tenses. Students must take the placement exam if this is their first RIT class in Spanish and they have some prior study of Spanish.
MLSP-202
Beginning Spanish II
This course continues the basic grammatical structures, vocabulary and situations of first-year Spanish, with foundation work in all skills (speaking, listening, reading, writing, culture). Beginning Spanish II continues work in the past tenses and includes work on the subjunctive mood, plus the future and conditional tenses. Students work on paragraph-length speech and writing, and move toward readiness for conversation and composition. Prerequisites: MLSP-201A.
MLFR-201
Beginning French I
This is the first course in a two-course sequence. The sequence provides students without prior exposure to the language with a sound basis for learning French as it is used today in its spoken and written forms. The goal of the sequence is proficiency in communication skills with an emphasis on oral proficiency. The sequence also acquaints students with contemporary culture and life in French-speaking countries. Students must take placement exam if this is their first RIT class in French and they have some prior study of French.
MLFR-202
Beginning French II
This is the second course in a two-course sequence. The sequence provides students without prior exposure to the language with a sound basis for learning French as it is used today in its spoken and written forms. The goal of the sequence is proficiency in communication skills with an emphasis on oral proficiency. The sequence also acquaints students with contemporary culture and life in French-speaking countries. Prerequisite: MLFR 201.
MLIT 201
Beginning Italian I
This is the first course in a two-course sequence. The sequence provides students without prior exposure to the language with a sound basis for learning Italian as it is used today in its spoken and written forms. The goal of the sequence is proficiency in communication skills with an emphasis on oral proficiency. The sequence also acquaints students with contemporary culture and life in the Italian-speaking countries. Students must take placement exam if this is their first RIT class in Italian and they have some prior study of Italian.
MLIT 202
Beginning Italian II
This is the second course in a two-course sequence. The sequence provides students without prior exposure to the language with a sound basis for learning Italian as it is used today in its spoken and written forms. The goal of the sequence is proficiency in communication skills with an emphasis on oral proficiency. The sequence also acquaints students with contemporary culture and life in the Italian-speaking countries. Prerequisite: MLIT 201.
MLRU-201
Beginning Russian I
Beginning Russian I introduces the Russian Language and builds foundational skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Grammar is introduced within conversational topics. The course is very interactive and students learn how to communicate on selected topics, creating dialogues and acting out real world situations. Students who have prior knowledge in Russian should take placement test before enrolling into the class. Beginning Russian I introduces the Russian Language and builds foundational skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Grammar is introduced within conversational topics. The course is very interactive and students learn how to communicate on selected topics, creating dialogues and acting out real world situations. Students who have prior knowledge in Russian should take placement test before enrolling into the class.
MLRU-202
Beginning Russian II
Beginning Russian II works on further development of communicative skills within conversational topics. Students learn more vocabulary and grammar and writing given topics are able to have conversations, read, and write in the target language. Students must take the placement exam and consult their program coordinator if this is their first RIT Russian class, and they have some prior study of Russian. Prerequisite: MLRU-201.
MLGR-201
Beginning German I
This is the first course in a two-course sequence. The sequence provides students without prior exposure to the language with a sound basis for learning German as it is used today in its spoken and written forms. The goal of the sequence is proficiency in communication skills with an emphasis on oral proficiency. The sequence also acquaints students with contemporary culture and life in the German-speaking countries. Students must take a placement exam if this is their first RIT class in German and they have some prior study of German.
MLGR-202
Beginning German II
This is the second course in a two-course sequence. The sequence provides students without prior exposure to the language with a sound basis for learning German as it is used today in its spoken and written forms. The goal of the sequence is proficiency in communication skills with an emphasis on oral proficiency. The sequence also acquaints students with contemporary culture and life in the German-speaking countries.
Third Year
DECS-310
Operations Management
A survey of operations and supply chain management that relates to both service- and goods- producing organizations. Topics include operations and supply chain strategies; ethical behavior; forecasting; product and service design, including innovation and sustainability; capacity and inventory management; lean operations; managing projects; quality assurance; global supply chains; and the impacts of technology. (Prerequisites: STAT-145 or MATH-251 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
MGMT-340
General Education-Ethical Perspective: Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility
This course applies concepts of ethics to business at the macro level and at the micro level. At the macro level the course examines competing business ideologies exploring the ethical concerns of capitalism as well as the role of business in society. At the micro level the course examines the role of the manager in establishing an ethical climate with an emphasis on the development of ethical leadership in business organizations. The following topics are typically discussed: the stakeholder theory of the firm, corporate governance, marketing and advertising ethics, the rights and responsibilities of employees, product safety, ethical reasoning, business's responsibility to the environment, moving from a culture of compliance to a culture of integrity, and ethical leadership. This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 2nd year standing.
3
PSYC-101
General Education-Social Perspective: Introduction to Psychology
Introduction to the field of psychology. Provides a survey of basic concepts, theories, and research methods. Topics include: thinking critically with psychological science; neuroscience and behavior; sensation and perception; learning; memory; thinking, language, and intelligence; motivation and emotion; personality; psychological disorders and therapy; and social psychology.
3
INTB-315
Exporting and Global Sourcing
The practice of international business is detailed-oriented and complex as cross-border trade and investment is subject to various market forces and government regulations. In this course students will study the issues of compliance, risk assessment, sources of international information, logistical complexities and intermediaries, and international payments and financing. The course will develop students with the necessary knowledge base and skills to become successful in the practice of cross border transactions. (Prerequisites: INTB-225 or equivalent course).
3
COMM-253
Communication
An introduction to communication contexts and processes emphasizing both conceptual and practical dimensions. Participants engage in public speaking, small group problem solving and leadership, and writing exercises while acquiring theoretical background appropriate to understanding these skills. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MKTG-330
Global Marketing
A hands-on course focusing on developing marketing strategies for entering and competing in foreign countries. Topics include foreign market opportunity assessment, developing commercialization and entry strategies, understanding foreign customers and distribution channels, and communicating value through advertising and promotion in different markets. (Prerequisites: MKTG-230 or equivalent course).
3
ENGL-312
General Education-Artistic Perspective: American Literature
This course presents a study of American literature by engaging in critically informed analysis of texts that emerged from within the geography, history, and cultures that constitute the modern United States. This includes work by colonial writers, Native American writers, African American writers, and writers from the many other ethnic and racial groups who have immigrated to and comprised the fabric of American culture. One of the goals of the class is to analyze and discuss the works in their respective socio-historical contexts, with a special focus on the ways in which individual works belong to a distinctly American literary tradition. Specific literary works studied will vary depending on the instructor.
3
General Education - foreign languages (choose one language): 6
MLSP-301
Intermediate Spanish I
This is the first course in the Intermediate Spanish sequence (second year). Intermediate Spanish I is a course in Conversation, along with grammar review and culture study. Emphasis is on tourist survival situation dialogues, various forms of conversation, and registers of formality. The basic skills learned in the first year courses are now put into practice. Students must take the placement exam if this is their first RIT Spanish class, and they have some prior study of Spanish. Prerequisite: MLSP-202.
MLSP-302
Intermediate Spanish II
This is the second course in the Intermediate Spanish sequence (second year). Intermediate Spanish II is a Composition course, emphasizing grammar review, composition, business-letter writing, Spanish for the Professions, and culture, while also including work in speaking and listening. The basic skills learned in the first year courses are now put into practice. In addition to the language work, there is significant work on cultural topics of Spanish-speaking countries at the intermediate level: both formal and informal culture (the arts and daily behavior). Students must take the placement exam if this is their first RIT Spanish class, and they have some prior study of Spanish. Prerequisite: MLSP-301.
MLIT-301
Intermediate Italian I
This is the first course of a two-course sequence at the intermediate level. The sequence provides students with the tools to increase their ability to function in Italian. Communicative activities, contemporary texts, and the study of vocabulary and grammar are used to expand all communication skills, especially oral proficiency. This sequence continues to address issues of contemporary Italian life and culture. Prerequisite: MLIT-202.
MLIT-302
Intermediate Italian II
This is the first course of a two-course sequence at the intermediate level. The sequence provides students with the tools to increase their ability to function in Italian. Communicative activities, contemporary texts, and the study of vocabulary and grammar are used to expand all communication skills, especially oral proficiency. This sequence continues to address issues of contemporary Italian life and culture. Prerequisite: MLIT-301.
MLRU-301
Intermediate Russian I
Intermediate Russian I starts second year of Russian language study. Students learn new topics with more complex language structures. Students are prepared for speaking on the topics as well as constructing free conversations in Russian. Students continue to develop their functional skills on an intermediate level. Students must take the placement exam and consult their program coordinator if this is their first RIT Russian class, and they have some prior study of Russian. Prerequisite: MLRU-202.
MLRU-302
Intermediate Russian II
Intermediate Russian II continues the second year of Russian language study. Students learn more new topics and continue developing conversational and functional skills on an intermediate level. They are able to have conversation on a variety of topics. Students are beginning to read more complex text and write essays on the topics. Students must take the placement exam and consult their program coordinator if this is their first RIT Russian class, and they have some prior study of Russian.
MLFR-301
Intermediate French I
This is the first course of a course of a two-course sequence at the intermediate level. The sequence provides students with the tools necessary to increase their ability to function in French. Communicative activities, contemporary texts, vocabulary study, and grammar are used to expand all communication skills, especially oral proficiency. This sequence continues to address issues of contemporary French life and culture as well as the cultures of the Francophone world. Prerequisite: MLFR-202.
MLFR-302
Intermediate French II
This is the second course of a two-course sequence at the intermediate level. The sequence provides students with the tools necessary to increase their ability to function in French. Communicative activities, contemporary texts, vocabulary study, and grammar are used to expand all communication skills, especially oral proficiency. This sequence continues to address issues of contemporary French life and culture as well as the cultures of the Francophone world.
MLGR-301
Intermediate German I
This is the first course of a two-course sequence at the intermediate level. The sequence provides students with the tools to increase their ability to function in German. Communicative activities, contemporary texts, and the study of vocabulary and grammar are used to expand all communication skills, especially oral proficiency. This sequence continues to address issues of contemporary German life and culture. Prerequisite: MLGR-202
MLGR-302
Intermediate German II
This is the second course of a two-course sequence at the intermediate level. The sequence provides students with the tools to increase their ability to function in German. Communicative activities, contemporary texts, the study of vocabulary and grammar are used to expand all communication skills, especially oral proficiency. This sequence continues to address issues of contemporary German life and culture
Forth Year
MGMT-560
Strategic Management
A capstone course drawing upon major business functions—accounting, finance, marketing, operations management, and organizational theory and how strategic managers integrate functional theories and concepts to create competitive advantage. The course provides an integrated perspective of business organizations toward the achievement of enhanced profitability and a sustainable competitive advantage. Topics include the analysis of business environments, industry attractiveness, and competitive dynamics. Students learn how to formulate and implement effective business-level, corporate-level, and global strategies using theories, cases and a simulation. (Prerequisites: MGMT-215 and MKTG-230 and FINC-220 and DECS-310 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ENVS-151
General Education - Scientific Principles Perspective,Scientific Inquiry in Environmental Science
This course is part of a two-semester course that combines an integrated approach to interconnected, interdisciplinary principles of environmental science through case studies, site visits and fieldwork. Through the given literature, discussion at lectures and case studies dealing with global environmental problems, as well as environmental problems related to the Dalmatian coast, students will learn how to critically analyze environmental problems from a multidisciplinary perspective and propose solutions.
4
PHIL-202
General Education -Ethical Perspective - Foundation of Moral Philosophy
This course is a survey of foundational, and normative, approaches to moral philosophy and their motivating moral questions. Topics will include virtue ethics, deontology, consequentialism, and other approaches. Some of the questions to be examined are: How is human nature related to morality? What are the grounds for moral obligations? Is there an ultimate moral principle? How do we reason about what to do? Can reason determine how we ought to live? What are moral judgments? Are there universal goods? What constitutes a morally worthwhile life? Can morality itself be challenged? Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
PHIL-311
General Education-Ethical, Global, Social Perspective -East Asian Philosophy
This course is an introduction to the origin and development of the philosophical traditions of primarily China and Japan through a consideration of selected thinkers, schools, and classic texts of Daoism, Confucianism, Buddhism, and Zen. Questions of metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics are emphasized with reference to the nature of reality and the person, social harmony and self-realization, causality, right action, and enlightenment. Comparisons may also be made with Western philosophers, both contemporary and classical.
3
INTB-550
Competing Globally
This course explores the opportunities and challenges businesses encounter creating and capturing value in the global environment. Areas of emphasis include: forecasting markets; why firms globalize; analyzing global competitors; the degree of globalization or regionalization; creating value for the firm globally which includes entry mode management, location decisions and timing, role of technology; and how to operate.
3
Choose two of the following: 6
PSYC-236
Personality
This course is intended for students who are interested in learning the history and current status of personality theories. Students will learn the strengths and weaknesses of the major personality theories, as well as how to assess, research and apply these theories. As much as possible, application to real life situations will be discussed. Prerequisites: PSYC-101 or PSYC-101H or completion of one (1) 200 level PSYC course.
ANTH-328
Heritage and Tourism
Tourism is a global industry and an important part of the human experience. There are many forces within tourism that act upon people’s lives, and in particular their environments, economies, cultural heritage, and identity. This course will explore tourism and its many dimensions. Beginning with an examination of kinds of tourism, this course unpacks tourism’s ancient trade and pilgrimage roots as well as its class dynamics of post-industrialization. Other aspects of tourism to be explored include strategies and effects of tourism development and production, nationalism and cultural identity, commoditization and marketing of culture and the ethics of development, labor and infrastructural changes, social inequalities, ecological impact, sustainable tourism, the experience of tourists, ritual and authenticity, and the relationship between tourists and tourism workers. This course provides opportunities for cross-cultural analysis of tourism sites, for participant-observation of the tourist experience, and for evaluation and recommendation of tourism site development in and around Rochester.
ACCT-430
Cost Accounting
Intermediate-level coverage of operational budgeting and performance evaluation. Development and use of cost data for external reporting and internal planning and control. Topics include operational budgeting, performance evaluation, job costing, process costing, joint product, and by-product costing, service department cost allocation, standard costing, activity-based costing, back-flush costing, and transfer pricing. Development of relevant cost information for special purposes is also considered. Prerequisites: ACCT-210 or NACC-206 or equivalent course.
ANTH-350
The Global Economy and the Grassroots
Economic globalization has given birth to global grassroots social movements. This course examines how global economic integration is brought about through multilateral institutions, multinational corporations, outsourcing, trade agreements, international lending, and neoliberal reforms. We consider impacts (cultural, economic, and health) of these trends on employees, farmers, small businesses, consumers, and the environment in the developed and developing worlds (with special emphasis on Latin America). We examine beliefs, alternative visions, and strategies of grassroots movements responding to these challenges.
PSYC-234
Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Industrial and organizational (I/O) psychology is a branch of applied psychology that is concerned with efficient management of an industrial labor force and especially with problems encountered by workers in a mechanized environment. Specific areas include job analysis, defining and measuring job performance, performance appraisal, tests, employment interviews, employee selection and training, and human factors. This course covers the basic principles of the above areas as well as applications of current research in I/O psychology. Prerequisites: PSYC-101 or PSYC-101H or completion of one (1) 200 level PSYC course.
Choose one set of minor courses
Marketing Minor
MKTG-350
MKTG-350 Consumer Behavior
<p>A study of the determinants of buying behaviors. &nbsp;Emphasis is on identifying target markets and customer needs, internal and external influences on lifestyle and understanding the buying decision process. Prerequisites: MKTG-230 or NBUS-227 or equivalent course.</p>
MKTG 370
Advertising and Promotion Management
<p>An in-depth view of tools of promotion management: advertising, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, direct marketing and internet marketing as well as new and alternative media. &nbsp;Basic concepts of how to use print, broadcast, internet and out-of-home media are studied. &nbsp;Planning, budgeting, creative strategy, and the roles of advertising agencies are also covered. Prerequisites: MKTG-230 or NBUS-227 or equivalent course.</p>
MKTG 320
MKTG 320 Digital Marketing
<p>Internet marketing is critical to an organization's overall strategy. This course focuses on tactics and strategies that enable marketers to fully leverage the internet. &nbsp;Topics include the overall internet marketing landscape, technologies, customer segmenting and targeting, search, analytics and emerging internet-marketing platforms. Prerequisites: MKTG-230 or NBUS-227 or equivalent course.</p>
MKTG-360
MKTG-360 Professional Selling
<p>Selling concepts, tools, strategies, and tactics are discussed as they apply to both external and internal customers. Students learn and experience some of problems faced and rewards earned by those in professional sales. Customer relationship management/partnering with customers and truly seeking to meet their requirements are discussed as key to long-term success. Prerequisites: MKTG-230 or NBUS-227 or equivalent course and 3rd year standing.</p>
Finance Minor
FINC-352
FINC-352 Financial Management II
<p>Advanced course in financial management. &nbsp;Covers project cash-flow analysis, issuance of securities, cost of capital, debt policy, dividend policy, and market efficiency Prerequisites: FINC-220 or equivalent course.</p>
FINC-362
FINC-362 Intermediate Investments
<p>Focuses on the financial investment problems faced by individuals and institutions. Theoretical topics include asset pricing, hedging and arbitrage. Application topics include risk management in bond-and-stock portfolio context. A discussion of options, futures and swaps also is included.</p>
FINC-430
Advanced Corporate Financial Planning
<p>This course focuses on strategic financial management of the corporation. &nbsp;It employs pedagogies that emphasize analysis and evaluation of applied financial problems. &nbsp;Topics include working capital management, financial statement analysis, valuation, capital budgeting decisions, and risk management. Prerequisites: FINC-352 or equivalent course.</p>
FINC-420
International Finance
<p>Discusses the problems posed by the international financial environment in which corporations operate. In particular, students learn to quantify and manage risks arising from shifting exchange rates. Other topics include exchange rate systems, international trade finance, international capital budgeting, country risk analysis, and long-term international financing.</p>
Management Minor
HRDE-380
Human Resource Management
<p>Human resources within an organization provide value added dimensions to the organization, which in turn influence the larger society within which the organization exists. The management of those human resources is a critical function within any organization. &nbsp;The goal of the human resource management (HRM) department is to attract qualified employees, manage systems that meet their needs and establish policies and protocols to retain and promote employee engagement. &nbsp;This effort develops a workforce that can meet the organizational strategic goals for growth and continued relevance in the world of work. &nbsp;This course provides an overview of HRM and the context within which HRM functions in organizations.</p>
MGMT-320
Organizational Effectiveness Skills
<p>This course provides students with working knowledge and practice of the professional and interpersonal skills of effective organizational members. Skills include networking, presenting, and professional writing, giving and receiving feedback, handling conflict, and leveraging diversity. &nbsp;Particular emphasis is placed upon applying these skills in a virtual work environment.<br /> Prerequisites: MGMT-215 or equivalent course.</p>
MGMT-310
Leading High-Performance Teams
<p>Taught in an experiential, team-based format, this class focuses on leading teams and developing strong team dynamics, especially within a high tech. environment. The course will provide hands-on experience in leading and participating in teams as students will be assigned to multiple teams with a specific role on each team, including team leader. When possible, the class includes a virtual team project with students at RIT’s global campuses.</p>
MGMT-330
Design Thinking and Concept Development
<p>Design thinking is a process that aids collaboration among designers, technologists, and business professionals. The process provides a structured creative process for discovering and developing products, services, and systems for profit and non-profit applications. Students will apply a wide range of design tools in a hands-on project. Topics include problem-framing, end-user research, visualization, methods for creative idea generation, and prototyping.</p>

Admission Requirements

Internationally recognized diplomas and high educational standards

Upon completion of the program, students will be granted two diplomas, an international American Bachelor of Science (BS) degree awarded by Rochester Institute of Technology and a Croatian degree from RIT Croatia with the degree title stručni prvostupnik/prvostupnica (baccalaureus/ baccalaurea) međunarodnog poslovanja for the GBM/IB program. The American RIT degree will offer you numerous opportunities worldwide. 

Programs and curriculum at RIT Croatia are fully aligned with the high standards of education at Rochester Institute of Technology*.  

*Rochester Institute of Technology is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104(267-284-5000). The Middle States Commission on Higher Education is an institutional accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation. 

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