Web and Mobile Computing BS

Programing at its best! The four-year Web and Mobile Computing / IT undergraduate program offered at RIT Croatia in Dubrovnik and Zagreb, prepares students for perspective and sought-after professions in the areas of programming, web and mobile application design and database modelling. 

84%

Outcome Rate of RIT Croatia graduates who have entered the workforce and/or have continued studies.

800

working hours of co-op minimum 

Overview

RIT was the first university in the US to introduce an Information technology program in 1992 and to this day it remains a leader in the education of IT experts by continuously setting trends in the industry. 

The Web and Mobile Computing curriculum is comprehensive. During your studies, you will develop skills in computer programming, software development, mobile app, and web development and you learn how to integrate the back-end code with the front-end user experience across several languages and platforms. 

All classes are conducted in English. In addition to advanced business English, students learn another foreign language and can choose from German, Italian, Spanish, or French.  

Here you can find the detailed Program Delivery Plan WMC/IT Program in Dubrovnik and Program Delivery Plan for WMC/IT Program in Zagreb

Upon completion of your sophomore year, you will be offered two different program areas to choose from: 

  • Mobile Application Development 
  • Web Application Development 

Acquired Skill Set 

You will develop the following set of skills and become proficient in: 

  • web application design and development, 
  • mobile application design and development, 
  • usage of existing and creation of different types of web services, 
  • planning, installing, configuring, developing, and maintaining web servers, 
  • understanding issues of scalability, performance and security in deploying a web presence. 

Choose a minor and expand knowledge about area of your interest

American higher education system enables students to choose a minor. It is a related set of academic courses that enables students to expand their knowledge; for example you can choose an International Business minor and combine it with the WMC/IT courses.  

Benefits of having a minor are multiple; from being visible on university transcript, to enabling a student to develop another area of professional expertise or personal interest and showcase depth in more than one discipline. 

You can find out more about minors available for the WMC program.

Careers and Cooperative Education

Typical Job Titles 

Frontend & Backend Developers NET and ASP Developers
Software Developers Product Managers
Full Stack Developers  

Minimum 800 hours of work experience 

What’s different about an RIT Croatia education? It’s the career experience you gain by completing cooperative education with top companies in every single industry. You’ll earn more than a degree. You’ll gain real-world career experience that sets you apart. 

The program is focused on hands-on experience from Day 1; therefore students are required to complete minimum 800 hours of cooperative education (co-op) or internship placements. This hands-on experience provides students with a valuable professional experience and gives them a competitive advantage in launching their careers. Students work for local and international renowned companies learning about service management from the best.  

Co-op is usually completed in the summer following the freshman and sophomore years. Co-op is planned, monitored, and evaluated by the student, the co-op counselor, and the employing firm. 

Curriculum

Web and Mobile Computing

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
ISTE-120
Computational Problem Solving in the Information Domain I
A first course in using the object-oriented approach to solve problems in the information domain. Students will learn to design software solutions using the object-oriented approach, to visually model systems using UML, to implement software solutions using a contemporary programming language, and to test these software solutions. Additional topics include thinking in object-oriented terms, and problem definition. Programming projects will be required.
4
MATH-131
General Education - Mathematical Perspective A: Discrete Mathematics
This course is an introduction to the topics of discrete mathematics, including number systems, sets and logic, relations, combinatorial methods, graph theory, regular sets, vectors, and matrices. Lecture 4 (Fall).
4
MATH-161
Applied Calculus
This course is an introduction to the study of differential and integral calculus, including the study of functions and graphs, limits, continuity, the derivative, derivative formulas, applications of derivatives, the definite integral, the fundamental theorem of calculus, basic techniques of integral approximation, exponential and logarithmic functions, basic techniques of integration, an introduction to differential equations, and geometric series. Applications in business, management sciences, and life sciences will be included with an emphasis on manipulative skills. Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH-101, MATH-111, MATH-131, NMTH-260, NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or Math Placement Exam score greater than or equal to 45.
4
NMDE-111
New Media Design Digital Survey I
This project-based course is an investigation of the computer as an illustrative, imaging, and graphical generation tool. It develops foundational design skills in raster and vector image creation, editing, compositing, layout and visual design for online production. Emphasis will be on the application of visual design organization methods and principles for electronic media. Students will create and edit images, graphics, layouts and typography to form effective design solutions for online delivery.
3
ISTE-140
Web & Mobile I
This course provides students with an introduction to internet and web technologies, and to development on Macintosh/UNIX computer platforms. Topics include HTML and CSS, CSS3 features, digital images, web page design and website publishing. Emphasis is placed on fundamentals, concepts and standards. Additional topics include the user experience, mobile design issues, and copyright/intellectual property considerations. Exercises and projects are required. Lec/Lab 3 (Fall).
3
ISTE-230
Introduction to Database and Data Modeling
A presentation of the fundamental concepts and theories used in organizing and structuring data. Coverage includes the data modeling process, basic relational model, normalization theory, relational algebra, and mapping a data model into a database schema. Structured Query Language is used to illustrate the translation of a data model to physical data organization. Modeling and programming assignments will be required. Note: students should have one course in object-oriented programming. (Prerequisites: ISTE-120. Lec/Lab Spring).
3
ISTE-240
Web & Mobile II
This course builds on the basics of web page development that are presented in Web and Mobile I and extends that knowledge to focus on theories, issues, and technologies related to the design and development of web sites. An overview of web design concepts, including usability, accessibility, information architecture, and graphic design in the context of the web will be covered. Introduction to web site technologies, including HTTP, web client and server programming, and dynamic page generation from a database also will be explored. Development exercises are required. Prerequisites: (ISTE-120 or CSCI-140 or CSCI-141 or NACA-161 or IGME-105 or IGME-101 or NMAD-180 or GCIS-123) and (ISTE-140 or NACA-172 or IGME-230 or IGME-235) or equivalent course.
3
UWRT-100
General Education Elective: Critical Reading and Writing
This course is designed to help students develop the literacy practices they will need to be successful in their First-Year Writing course. Students will read, understand, interpret, and synthesize a variety of texts. Assignments are designed to challenge students intellectually, culturally and rhetorically. Through inquiry-based assignment sequences, students will improve their writing by developing academic research and literacy practices that will be further strengthened in First-Year Writing. Particular attention will be given to critical reading, academic writing conventions, and revision. Small class size promotes frequent student-instructor and student-student interaction. The course also emphasizes the principles of intellectual property and academic integrity in academic writing.
3
UWRT-150
General Education Elective; Writing Intensive: FYW: Writing Seminar
Writing Seminar is a three-credit course limited to 19 students per section. The course is designed to develop first-year students’ proficiency in analytical and rhetorical reading and writing, and critical thinking. Students will read, understand, and interpret a variety of non-fiction texts representing different cultural perspectives and/or academic disciplines. These texts are designed to challenge students intellectually and to stimulate their writing for a variety of contexts and purposes. Through inquiry-based assignment sequences, students will develop academic research and literacy practices that will be further strengthened throughout their academic careers. Particular attention will be given to the writing process, including an emphasis on teacher-student conferencing, critical self-assessment, class discussion, peer review, formal and informal writing, research, and revision. Small class size promotes frequent student-instructor and student-student interaction. The course also emphasizes the principles of intellectual property and academic integrity for both current academic and future professional writing.
3
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connection
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
Second Year
ISTE-99
School of Information Second Year Seminar
This course helps students prepare for cooperative employment by developing job search approaches and material. Students will explore current and emerging aspects of IST fields to help focus their skill development strategies. Students are introduced to the Office of Career Services and Cooperative Education, and learn about their professional and ethical responsibilities for their co-op and subsequent professional experiences. Students will work collaboratively to build résumés, cover letters, and prepare for interviewing. (Prerequisites: This class is restricted to students with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 1 (Fall).
0
ISTE-222
Computational Problem Solving in the Information Domain III
The third course in the programming sequence expanding the student’s knowledge base of higher level programming concepts including data structures, algorithm development and analysis, Big-O notation, directed graphs, priority queues, performance, and a greater understanding of how complex software can more easily be designed. Programming assignments are required. (Prerequisites: ISTE-121 or ISTE-200 or CSCI-142 or CSCI-140 or IGME-106 or CSCI-242 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISTE-252
Foundations of Mobile Design
This course is an introduction to designing, prototyping, and creating applications and web applications for mobile devices. These devices include a unique set of hardware and communications capabilities, incorporate novel interfaces, are location aware, and provide persistent connectivity. Topics covered include user interaction patterns, connectivity, interface design, software design patterns, and application architectures. Programming projects are required. (Prerequisites: ISTE-24. Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).
3
ISTE-260
Designing the User Experience
The user experience is an important design element in the development of interactive systems. This course presents the foundations of user-centered design principles within the context of human-computer interaction (HCI). Students will explore and practice HCI methods that span the development lifecycle from requirements analysis and creating the product/service vision through system prototyping and usability testing. Leading edge interface technologies are examined. Group-based exercises and design projects are required. (Prerequisite: ISTE-140) Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).
3
ISTE-330
Database Connectivity and Access
In this course, students will build applications that interact with databases. Through programming exercises, students will work with multiple databases and programmatically invoke the advanced database processing operations that are integral to contemporary computing applications. Topics include the database drivers, the data layer, connectivity operations, security and integrity, and controlling database access. (Prerequisites: ISTE-230) Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).
3
ISTE-340
Client Programming
This course will explore the analysis, design, development, and implementation of client-side programming in the context of Internet technologies, mobile devices, Web-based client systems and desktop applications. Students will learn to design and build usable and effective interactive systems, clients, and interfaces. Key features addressed will include browser and platform compatibility, object reusability, bandwidth and communications issues, development environments, privacy and security, and related technologies and APIs. Programming is required. (Prerequisites: (STE-240 and ISTE-121) Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).
3
NSSA-290
Networking Essentials for Developers
This is a course in the basics of network communication for software developers. Topics will include the OSI 7-layer model and its realization in the TCP/IP protocol stack. Students will also learn about naming and name resolution as it is used in the internet, plus the basics of routing and switching. The focus in all of this will be on an analysis of how name resolution, routing and switching operate at the developer's perspective. The specifics of how the socket transport layer appears to the programmer and operates will be a key topic. Finally, an overview of authentication mechanisms and number of examples of the security vulnerabilities of existing communication protocols will be provided to instruct students on the inherent risks of communication via the INTERNET. (Prerequisites: ISTE-121) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
SWEN-383
Software Design Principles and Patterns
Quality software designs and architectures reflect software engineering principles that represent best contemporary practice. This course focuses on explicating these fundamental principles, examining a set of design and architecture patterns that embody the principles, and applying patterns appropriate to a design problem in a given context. Restricted to IST majors only. (Prerequisites: ISTE-240 or equivalent course. Co-requisite: ISTE-340 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).
3
ISTE-499
Undergraduate Co-op (summer)
Students perform paid, professional work related to their program of study. Students work full-time during the term they are registered for co-op. Students must complete a student co-op work report for each term they are registered; students also are evaluated each term by their employer. A satisfactory grade is given for co-op when both a completed student co-op report and a corresponding employer report that indicates satisfactory student performance are received. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer)
0
General Education - Foreign Languages (choose one language) 4
MLFR-201
Beginning French I
This is the first course in a two-course sequence. The sequence provides students without prior exposure to the language with a sound basis for learning French as it is used today in its spoken and written forms. The goal of the sequence is proficiency in communication skills with an emphasis on oral proficiency. The sequence also acquaints students with contemporary culture and life in French-speaking countries. Students must take placement exam if this is their first RIT class in French and they have some prior study of French.
MLFR-202
Beginning French II
This is the second course in a two-course sequence. The sequence provides students without prior exposure to the language with a sound basis for learning French as it is used today in its spoken and written forms. The goal of the sequence is proficiency in communication skills with an emphasis on oral proficiency. The sequence also acquaints students with contemporary culture and life in French-speaking countries. Prerequisite: MLFR 201.
MLGR-201
Beginning German I
This is the first course in a two-course sequence. The sequence provides students without prior exposure to the language with a sound basis for learning German as it is used today in its spoken and written forms. The goal of the sequence is proficiency in communication skills with an emphasis on oral proficiency. The sequence also acquaints students with contemporary culture and life in the German-speaking countries. Students must take a placement exam if this is their first RIT class in German and they have some prior study of German.
MLGR-202
Beginning German II
This is the second course in a two-course sequence. The sequence provides students without prior exposure to the language with a sound basis for learning German as it is used today in its spoken and written forms. The goal of the sequence is proficiency in communication skills with an emphasis on oral proficiency. The sequence also acquaints students with contemporary culture and life in the German-speaking countries.
MLIT 201
Beginning Italian I
This is the first course in a two-course sequence. The sequence provides students without prior exposure to the language with a sound basis for learning Italian as it is used today in its spoken and written forms. The goal of the sequence is proficiency in communication skills with an emphasis on oral proficiency. The sequence also acquaints students with contemporary culture and life in the Italian-speaking countries. Students must take placement exam if this is their first RIT class in Italian and they have some prior study of Italian.
MLIT 202
Beginning Italian II
This is the second course in a two-course sequence. The sequence provides students without prior exposure to the language with a sound basis for learning Italian as it is used today in its spoken and written forms. The goal of the sequence is proficiency in communication skills with an emphasis on oral proficiency. The sequence also acquaints students with contemporary culture and life in the Italian-speaking countries. Prerequisite: MLIT 201.
MLRU-201
Beginning Russian I
Beginning Russian I introduces the Russian Language and builds foundational skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Grammar is introduced within conversational topics. The course is very interactive and students learn how to communicate on selected topics, creating dialogues and acting out real world situations. Students who have prior knowledge in Russian should take placement test before enrolling into the class. Beginning Russian I introduces the Russian Language and builds foundational skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Grammar is introduced within conversational topics. The course is very interactive and students learn how to communicate on selected topics, creating dialogues and acting out real world situations. Students who have prior knowledge in Russian should take placement test before enrolling into the class.
MLRU-202
Beginning Russian II
Beginning Russian II works on further development of communicative skills within conversational topics. Students learn more vocabulary and grammar and writing given topics are able to have conversations, read, and write in the target language. Students must take the placement exam and consult their program coordinator if this is their first RIT Russian class, and they have some prior study of Russian. Prerequisite: MLRU-201.
MLSP-201
A: Beginning Spanish I
Beginning Spanish IA is for true beginners of Spanish: those who have never studied the language or have very little recollection of it (the latter as acknowledged by placement test results). This course introduces the Spanish language and the culture of Hispanic countries to beginners, and provides a basic foundation in all skills in Spanish (speaking, listening, reading, writing, culture) through intensive practice in a variety of media. Language work progresses from autobiographical information, through the present tense, to preliminary work in the past tenses. Students must take the placement exam if this is their first RIT class in Spanish and they have some prior study of Spanish.
MLSP-202
Beginning Spanish II
This course continues the basic grammatical structures, vocabulary and situations of first-year Spanish, with foundation work in all skills (speaking, listening, reading, writing, culture). Beginning Spanish II continues work in the past tenses and includes work on the subjunctive mood, plus the future and conditional tenses. Students work on paragraph-length speech and writing, and move toward readiness for conversation and composition. Prerequisites: MLSP-201A.
Third Year
ISTE-341
Server Programming
This course provides in-depth work in server-side programming. Students will develop dynamic, data centric web pages and systems, and server-side information services that will be available to clients implemented in a variety of software technologies. Topics include XML parsing, generation, and consumption; web configuration and security; design patterns; web service structures, and application security. Programming projects are required. (Prerequisites: ISTE-340 and STE-230 and SWEN-383) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISTE-422
Application Development Practices
In this course, students will gain experience with the processes, practices, and tools professional developers use to deliver robust and maintainable applications. Students will apply these practices and tools to build smaller-scale production-quality applications and systems. Topics include development life cycles, version control, test bed development and use, build utilities, error handling, deployment tools, and documentation. (Prerequisites: ISTE-121 or ISTE-200 or CSCI-142 or CSCI-140 or IGME-106 or CSCI-242 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISTE-499
Undergraduate Co-op (summer)
Students perform paid, professional work related to their program of study. Students work full-time during the term they are registered for co-op. Students must complete a student co-op work report for each term they are registered; students also are evaluated each term by their employer. A satisfactory grade is given for co-op when both a completed student co-op report and a corresponding employer report that indicates satisfactory student performance are received. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer)
0
ENVS-150
General education Elecive;Natural Science Inquiry Perspective; Scientific Principles Perspective;Science / Math Literacy: Ecology of the Dalmatian Coast
This course is an introduction to population, community, and ecosystem ecology; stressing the dynamic interrelationships of plant and animal communities of the Dalmatian Coast. The course includes such ecological concepts as energy flow and trophic levels in natural communities, population and community dynamics, biogeography and ecosystem ecology. Field trips to local Croatian ecosystems are included.
4
Cultural Anthropology Immersion (student must complete 3 courses) 9
ANTH-210
General Education - Culture and Globalization
By exploring critical issues of globalizing culture, we examine how ideas, attitudes, and values are exchanged or transmitted across conventional borders. How has the production, articulation, and dissemination of cultural forms (images, languages, practices, beliefs) been shaped by global capitalism, media industries, communication technologies, migration, and tourist travels? How are cultural imaginaries forged, exchanged, and circulated among a global consumer public? How has the internationalizing of news, computer technologies, video-sharing websites, blogging sites, and other permutations of instant messaging served to accelerate cultural globalization? Students will be introduced to anthropological perspectives on cultural globalization, the transmission of culture globally, and the subsequent effects on social worlds, peoples, communities, and nations.
ANTH-301
General Education - Social and Cultural Theory
This course explores influential classical and contemporary theories regarding society and culture. Students will assess the utility of different theories in addressing key enduring questions regarding human behavior, the organization of society, the nature of culture, the relationship between the individual and society, social control and social conflict, social groups and social hierarchy, the operation of power, cultural and social change, and the interplay between the global and the local. Theories will be marshaled to shed light on contemporary social and cultural phenomena and problems such as crime, violence, exploitation, modernity, and globalization.
ANTH-380
General Education - Nationalism and Identity
Nationalism is often described in terms of strong sentiments and acts of self-determination on the part of members of a nation as distinct from the state that is necessarily a territorially and politically defined entity. This course will explore leading theories related to the origins of contemporary nationalism and nationalism's importance within the context of state societies, especially in Europe. The past as an invented historical or imagined reality will be highlighted, as invented pasts contribute to claims for exclusive national culture and both exclusive and contested identities. The relationships between culture, literacy, and capitalism will be applied to understanding select historical and ethnographic cases of nationalism.
ANTH-350
The Global Economy and the Grassroots
Economic globalization has given birth to global grassroots social movements. This course examines how global economic integration is brought about through multilateral institutions, multinational corporations, outsourcing, trade agreements, international lending, and neoliberal reforms. We consider impacts (cultural, economic, and health) of these trends on employees, farmers, small businesses, consumers, and the environment in the developed and developing worlds (with special emphasis on Latin America). We examine beliefs, alternative visions, and strategies of grassroots movements responding to these challenges.
PHIL-202
General Education -Ethical Perspective - Foundation of Moral Philosophy
This course is a survey of foundational, and normative, approaches to moral philosophy and their motivating moral questions. Topics will include virtue ethics, deontology, consequentialism, and other approaches. Some of the questions to be examined are: How is human nature related to morality? What are the grounds for moral obligations? Is there an ultimate moral principle? How do we reason about what to do? Can reason determine how we ought to live? What are moral judgments? Are there universal goods? What constitutes a morally worthwhile life? Can morality itself be challenged? Lecture 3 (Spring).
ISTE-442
Secure Web Application Development
When building larger-scale web applications, there are a myriad of concerns that range from technology, security, framework, and architecture selection to runtime performance optimization. This course focuses on the development of secure integrated web applications that consume information served from one or many sources. Trends in web application development are identified and assessed. Programming projects are required. (Prerequisites: ISTE-341 or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).
ISTE-444
Web Server Development and Administration
Web developers often need to go beyond building web pages and client-server programming to plan, install, configure, develop, and maintain the Web servers that host their sites. They need to understand issues of scalability, performance, and security as they apply to deploying a web presence. This course provides a practical hands-on approach to development, configuration, and administration of web server platforms. Topics include issues of and approaches to scalability, multiple server systems, security, and auditing, as well as the many configuration options, modules, and server alternatives available. (Prerequisites: ISTE-341 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).
Modern Language Immersion 6
MLFR-301
Intermediate French I
This is the first course of a course of a two-course sequence at the intermediate level. The sequence provides students with the tools necessary to increase their ability to function in French. Communicative activities, contemporary texts, vocabulary study, and grammar are used to expand all communication skills, especially oral proficiency. This sequence continues to address issues of contemporary French life and culture as well as the cultures of the Francophone world. Prerequisite: MLFR-202.
MLFR-302
Intermediate French II
This is the second course of a two-course sequence at the intermediate level. The sequence provides students with the tools necessary to increase their ability to function in French. Communicative activities, contemporary texts, vocabulary study, and grammar are used to expand all communication skills, especially oral proficiency. This sequence continues to address issues of contemporary French life and culture as well as the cultures of the Francophone world.
MLGR-301
Intermediate German I
This is the first course of a two-course sequence at the intermediate level. The sequence provides students with the tools to increase their ability to function in German. Communicative activities, contemporary texts, and the study of vocabulary and grammar are used to expand all communication skills, especially oral proficiency. This sequence continues to address issues of contemporary German life and culture. Prerequisite: MLGR-202
MLGR-302
Intermediate German II
This is the second course of a two-course sequence at the intermediate level. The sequence provides students with the tools to increase their ability to function in German. Communicative activities, contemporary texts, the study of vocabulary and grammar are used to expand all communication skills, especially oral proficiency. This sequence continues to address issues of contemporary German life and culture
MLRU-301
Intermediate Russian I
Intermediate Russian I starts second year of Russian language study. Students learn new topics with more complex language structures. Students are prepared for speaking on the topics as well as constructing free conversations in Russian. Students continue to develop their functional skills on an intermediate level. Students must take the placement exam and consult their program coordinator if this is their first RIT Russian class, and they have some prior study of Russian. Prerequisite: MLRU-202.
MLRU-302
Intermediate Russian II
Intermediate Russian II continues the second year of Russian language study. Students learn more new topics and continue developing conversational and functional skills on an intermediate level. They are able to have conversation on a variety of topics. Students are beginning to read more complex text and write essays on the topics. Students must take the placement exam and consult their program coordinator if this is their first RIT Russian class, and they have some prior study of Russian.
MLSP-301
Intermediate Spanish I
This is the first course in the Intermediate Spanish sequence (second year). Intermediate Spanish I is a course in Conversation, along with grammar review and culture study. Emphasis is on tourist survival situation dialogues, various forms of conversation, and registers of formality. The basic skills learned in the first year courses are now put into practice. Students must take the placement exam if this is their first RIT Spanish class, and they have some prior study of Spanish. Prerequisite: MLSP-202.
MLSP-302
Intermediate Spanish II
This is the second course in the Intermediate Spanish sequence (second year). Intermediate Spanish II is a Composition course, emphasizing grammar review, composition, business-letter writing, Spanish for the Professions, and culture, while also including work in speaking and listening. The basic skills learned in the first year courses are now put into practice. In addition to the language work, there is significant work on cultural topics of Spanish-speaking countries at the intermediate level: both formal and informal culture (the arts and daily behavior). Students must take the placement exam if this is their first RIT Spanish class, and they have some prior study of Spanish. Prerequisite: MLSP-301.
Forth Year
ISTE-500
Senior Development Project I
The first course in a two-course, senior level, system development capstone project. Students form project teams and work with sponsors to define system requirements. Teams then create architectures and designs, and depending on the project, also may begin software development. Requirements elicitation and development practices introduced in prior coursework are reviewed, and additional methods and processes are introduced. Student teams are given considerable latitude in how they organize and conduct project work. (This class is restricted to WMC-BS, HCC-BS, CMIT-BS students with a minimum of 2 terms of co-op completed.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
STE-501
Senior Development Project II (WI-PR)
The first course in a two-course, senior level, system development capstone project. Students form project teams and work with sponsors to define system requirements. Teams then create architectures and designs, and depending on the project, also may begin software development. Requirements elicitation and development practices introduced in prior coursework are reviewed, and additional methods and processes are introduced. Student teams are given considerable latitude in how they organize and conduct project work. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ISTE-454
Mobile Application Development I
This course extends the material covered in the Foundations of Mobile Design course and provides students with the experience of creating interesting applications for small-size form factor mobile devices such as smartphones These devices are exceptionally portable, have unique sets of hardware and communications capabilities, incorporate novel interfaces, are location aware, and provide persistent connectivity. Students are encouraged to make creative use of these unique device characteristics and operating properties to develop innovative applications. Programming projects are required. (Prerequisites: (ISTE-252 and ISTE-340) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall).
3
ISTE-456
Mobile Application Development II
This course extends the Foundations of Mobile Design course in that students will learn to apply mobile design skills to develop applications in the Android platform. Students will design, develop, and test mobile applications using the Android Studio IDE. This course covers the major components such as activities, receivers, content providers, permissions, intents, fragments, data storage, and security. Programming projects are required (Prerequisites: (ISTE-252 and ISTE-340). Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).
3
ENVS-151
General Education - Scientific Principles Perspective,Scientific Inquiry in Environmental Science
This course is part of a two-semester course that combines an integrated approach to interconnected, interdisciplinary principles of environmental science through case studies, site visits and fieldwork. Through the given literature, discussion at lectures and case studies dealing with global environmental problems, as well as environmental problems related to the Dalmatian coast, students will learn how to critically analyze environmental problems from a multidisciplinary perspective and propose solutions.
4

Admission Requirements

Internationally recognized diplomas and high educational standards

Upon completion of the program, students will be granted two diplomas, an international American Bachelor of Science (BS) degree awarded by Rochester Institute of Technology and a Croatian degree from RIT Croatia with the degree title stručni prvostupnik/prvostupnica (baccalaureus/ baccalaurea) inženjer/inženjerka informacijskih tehnologija for the WMC program. The American RIT degree will offer you numerous opportunities worldwide. 

Programs and curriculum at RIT Croatia are fully aligned with the high standards of education at Rochester Institute of Technology*.  

*Rochester Institute of Technology is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104(267-284-5000). The Middle States Commission on Higher Education is an institutional accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation. 

Testimonials

Previous Testimonial Next Testimonial