Programs of Study / Minors

Students pursuing a bachelor’s degree have the option of completing a minor, which can complement a student’s major, help them develop another area of professional expertise, or enable them to pursue an area of personal interest. Completion of a minor is formally designated on the baccalaureate transcript, which serves to highlight this accomplishment to employers and graduate schools. In contrast to the optional minor, as part of their bachelor's degree requirements, students must complete an immersion—a concentration of three courses in a particular area. View full list of RIT minors and immersions.

Please note: A minor is a related set of academic courses consisting of no fewer than 15 credit hours. The following parameters must be met in order to earn a minor:

  • At least nine credit hours of the minor must consist of courses not required by the student’s home major.
  • Students may pursue multiple minors. A minimum of nine credit hours must be designated towards each minor; these courses may not be counted towards other minors.
  • The residency requirement for a minor is a minimum of nine credit hours consisting of RIT courses (excluding “X” graded courses).

Not all minors are approved to fulfill general education requirements. Please check with an adviser in regards to minors approved to fulfill these requirements.

The exercise science minor includes foundation sequences in anatomy and physiology upon which the basic principles of exercise physiology, fitness assessment, and the preparation of fitness programs are built. The minor prepares students to sit for professional certification examinations for work in the fitness industry, provides understanding of sports physiology for those interested in sports equipment design and technology, and complements and enhances personal fitness.

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The nutritional sciences minor enhances a student’s major with a focus on nutrients and human nutrition issues. The study of nutrients includes knowledge about their sources, metabolism, and relationship to health. Nutritional status impacts medicine, health care policy and promotion, global relationships, issues in anthropology and sociology, exercise science, food systems, hospitality, and behavioral health.

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