Nutritional Sciences Minor

Overview for Nutritional Sciences Minor

The nutritional sciences minor enhances a student’s major with a focus on nutrients and human nutrition issues. The study of nutrients includes knowledge about their sources, metabolism, and relationship to health. Nutritional status impacts medicine, health care policy and promotion, global relationships, issues in anthropology and sociology, exercise science, food systems, hospitality, and behavioral health.

Notes about this minor:

  • This minor is closed to students majoring in nutritional sciences.
  • Posting of the minor on the student's academic transcript requires a minimum GPA of 2.0 in the minor.

The plan code for Nutritional Sciences Minor is NUTRSC-MN.

Curriculum for 2023-2024 for Nutritional Sciences Minor

Current Students: See Curriculum Requirements

Course
Required Courses
NUTR-215
Concepts in Human Nutrition
This is an introductory course in nutritional science concepts and application to current nutrition issues. This course covers the study of specific nutrients and their functions, the development of dietary standards and guides and how these standards are applied throughout the lifecycle. Current health and nutrition problems, nutrition misinformation, chronic diseases, performance nutrition, food safety and technology, hunger and global nutrition will be discussed. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
Choose one of the following course sequences
   MEDS-250,251
 Human Anatomy and Physiology I, II
   MEDG-101,102,103,104
 Human Biology I, II and Human Biology Laboratory I, II
Electives
Choose two of the following
   BIOL-111
 Science in the Garden
This course will introduce students to the science behind how plants grow, and how to apply this knowledge in a garden setting. The rationale is to encourage sustainability in garden food production, with an emphasis on organic methods. The course will be part lecture and part practical, with some sessions being conducted in the greenhouse or community garden. Lab 3, Lecture 3 (Fall).
   BIOL-218
 Biology of Plants
This course will focus on aspects of plant anatomy and diversity and their impact on plant physiology. Adaptations to the environment and biotechnological approaches to unraveling the physiology of plants will be explored. A feature of this course will be discussion groups on plant topics from the popular scientific literature- e.g. Biofuels, Bioengineered Plants. The laboratory classes will follow the lectures closely, to give an opportunity to examine the structure and physiology of different plant genera. (Prerequisites: (BIOL-101 and BIOL-102 and BIOL-103 and BIOL-104) or (BIOL-121 and BIOL-122) or (BIOL-123 and BIOL-124 and BIOL-125 and BIOL-126) or equivalent courses.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall).
   BIOL-305
 Plants, Medicine and Technology
Plants have played a significant role in the shaping of our world. This course will explore the utilization of plants for foods, fuels, materials, medicine, novel genetic information, and social aspects of different cultures. All cultures depend on about fifteen plant species, most of which have been changed by plant improvement methods to enhance human benefits. This course will explore these changes in important crops, plant constituents used in medicine, and the technology used to produce important plant-produced medicines. (Prerequisite: BIOL-201 or BIOL-202 or BIOL-206 or BIOG-240 or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
   BIOL-403
 Fundamentals of Plant Biochemistry and Pathology
This course is primarily focused on biochemical and pathological aspects of a plant's life. This course provides an understanding of why protein catalysts are important in the field of plant biochemistry and plant pathology. More specifically, the role enzymes play in the basic cellular processes of plant growth and development is presented. Topics related to plant pathology are presented; such as plant disease epidemics, plant diagnosis, plant diseases caused by fungi, bacteria, nematodes, viruses, and plant-pathogen interaction, at the ecological, physiological and genetic level. (Prerequisites: BIOL-321 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
   BIOL-414
 Animal Nutrition
Students will explore applied topics in companion, agriculture, and wildlife animal nutrition. Emphasis will be placed on an overview of nutrient classes and methods of nutrient analysis, biological nutrient requirements, comparative digestive strategies, and specialized adaptations of animal taxa with different feeding strategies. Class discussions will focus on reading and interpretation of primary literature and investigating applied nutritional research questions. (Pre-requisite: BIOL-202 or BIOL-206 or BIOL-212 or BIOL-265 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
   HSPT-215
 Principles of Food Production and Service
Principles of Food Production and Service is a basic course covering food preparation methods, quality standards, food presentation, professionalism in food preparation and service, sanitation and safety processes in commercial kitchens, kitchen and restaurant organization and roles, and food service styles. Students completing this course should be able to function effectively in a kitchen or restaurant environment; including demonstrating professional appearance and behaviors; and knowledge of food preparation techniques, effective food presentation, food safety and sanitation practices, appropriate service styles, teamwork, and cleanup practices. Students are expected to achieve their required co-curricular requirement – the ServSafe Manager certification – by the end of this course. Lec/Lab 6 (Fall).
   NUTR-205
 Complementary and Integrative Approaches for Well-Being
Complementary and alternative therapies for well-being are defined and described with information provided in the context of safety issues, efficacy, regulations, marketing, resource discrimination. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
   NUTR-300
 Sports Nutrition
This course will provide an introduction to the integration between exercise and nutrition-related topics by exploring the intimate link among nutrition, energy metabolism, and human exercise response. The course content will sort fact from fiction and help students and practitioners obtain the knowledge they need to give sound advice to athletes and active individuals. (Prerequisite: College level science course preferred.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
   NUTR-333
 Nutrition Education for Health Professionals
Nutrition Education for Health Professionals is a 3-credit course focused on the theory and practice of providing nutrition information with specific focus on writing for nutrition communications. This course prepares students to provide effective nutrition education and counseling, and give effective presentations. The course highlights the role of technology in health and nutrition programs and the application of technology in health and nutrition program evaluation. Topics include communications methods, writing skills for the nutrition discipline, learner/ audience analysis, basic learning and behavior theory, developing counseling and training materials, as well as designing, making, and evaluating individual and group presentations using various approaches, including technology applications. (Prerequisites: NUTR-215 and CHMB-402 and MEDS-250 and MEDS-251 or equivalent courses and student standing in NUTR-BS, NUTRSC-BS or NUTRSC-MN program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
   NUTR-510
 Integrative Approaches to Health
This class offers students in the Nutrition Management major an overview of controversial and accepted alternative diet therapies, basic medicine guidelines, and vitamin/mineral supplementation. (Prerequisites: NUTR-215 and CHMB-402 and MEDS-250 and MEDS-251 or equivalent courses and student standing in NUTR-BS, NUTRSC-BS or NUTRSC-MN program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
   NUTR-525
 Medical Nutrition Therapy I
This course is the first course of a two course series. Review and application of biological metabolism and interrelationships of nutrients, hormones, enzymes, and other biochemical substances in humans. Modification of nutritional intake to meet nutritional needs altered by diseases and stress as well as use of alternate methods of feeding (enteral/parenteral) to meet nutritional needs is discussed in depth. This course emphasizes the practical applications of medical nutritional therapy for use with patients/clients. (Prerequisites: NUTR-215 and CHMB-402 and MEDS-250 and MEDS-251 or equivalent courses and student standing in NUTR-BS, NUTRSC-BS or NUTRSC-MN program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
   NUTR-526
 Medical Nutrition Therapy II
This course is a continuation of NUTR-525 Medical Nutrition Therapy I. Review and application of biological metabolism and interrelationships of nutrients, hormones, enzymes, and other biochemical substances in humans. Modification of nutritional intake to meet nutritional needs altered by diseases and stress as well as use of alternate methods of feeding (enteral/parenteral) to meet nutritional needs is discussed in depth. This course emphasizes the practical applications of medical nutritional therapy for use with patients/clients. (Prerequisites: NUTR-525 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
   NUTR-555
 Nutrition Throughout the Lifecycle
This course emphasizes the interrelationships of social, psychological, physiological, and biochemical factors and their impact on nutrient requirements and recommendations for food intake during specific stages of the life cycle. Emphasis is given to nutrition during pregnancy, infancy, early childhood, adolescence, young and middle adulthood, and the elderly. (Prerequisites: NUTR-215 and CHMB-402 and MEDS-250 and MEDS-251 or equivalent courses and student standing in NUTRSC-BS or NUTRSC-MN.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
   NUTR-580
 Global Food and Nutrition Perspectives
This course provides an overview of global food and nutrition concepts and issues from both developed and developing country perspectives. Topics include breastfeeding, macronutrients and micronutrient problems, food security and access, food emergencies, maternal and child health and the impacts of socio-economic disparities on nutrition status. Also addressed are challenges in food and nutrition policy development, program design and implementation that are unique to global efforts and sustainable development goals (SDGs). Students apply course content and analytical thinking skills to a unique self-selected country and develop dissemination skills by informing others of the unique food, nutrition and health issues. (Prerequisites: NUTR-215 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).

Facilities

  • Three students and a faculty member working on laptops around a table.
    NEEDs Lab

    The mission of the Nutrition Education, Engineering, and Designs (NEEDs) lab is to engineer and design research and evaluation services that foster promotion and delivery of evidence-based health and nutrition education.

  • 3 students using a stethoscope on a dummy patient and a monitor with data readouts
    Simulation Lab

    The Simulation Laboratory consists of three parts a patient room that contains a simulation mannequin, a control room where operation of the mannequin occurs, and a debriefing room where faculty interact with students after simulated medical scenarios end.

  • Student engaged in virtual reality boxing.
    Human Movement Lab

    The Human Movement Lab houses state-of-the-art equipment utilized by exercise science students to gain hands-on experience conducting fitness assessments and testing.