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Our Mission

The College of Science prepares graduates for careers in the physical, life, and mathematical sciences and provides mathematical and scientific foundations for all RIT students through academic programs and impactful innovative research that expand scientific knowledge and develop new technologies to advance the sciences and their application to society and our environment. We embrace social justice and equity related to but not limited to education, research, and the scientific community at large. 

Join us for Fall 2023

Applications will be reviewed on a rolling, space-available basis.

First-year application details
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Visit us on campus

Schedule an undergrad info session and campus tour.

More ways to experience RIT

Statistics

4

Ph.D. Programs

Programs include astrophysical sciences and technology, color science, imaging science, and mathematical modeling

11

Research Centers and Laboratories

College of Science boasts state-of-the-art facilities with specialized labs and equipment for conducting research

3rd

Largest Source of Undergraduate STEM Degrees

RIT is among the top producers of undergraduate STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) degrees among all private universities in the nation

4

Research Experiences for Undergraduates

REUs allow students to conduct research away from home universities

Discover Your Passion

Meet the Dean (Interim)

Andre Hudson

The faculty and staff of the College of Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology educate and inspire the next generation of scientists and mathematicians to solve current and emerging problems facilitated by rigorous curricula and experiential learning. The great scientist Louis Pasteur stated: “Science knows no country because knowledge belongs to humanity, and is the torch which illuminates the world. Science is the highest personification of the nation because that nation will remain the first which carries the furthest the works of thought and intelligence.”

Andre Hudson
Interim Dean, College of Science
585-475-4259

Faces of RIT

Latest News

  • February 1, 2023

    four researchers standing in a room under construction.

    Expanding RIT’s research footprint

    RIT has been expanding its research footprint to accommodate the university’s growing research portfolio. The Student Hall for Exploration and Development (SHED), which opens this fall, is enabling the university to convert 10 existing classrooms, totaling more than 23,000 square feet, into new research space. Another 14,700 square feet of research space opened in January in Brown Hall.

  • February 1, 2023

    students wearing eyewear and microphones along with faculty members looking at computer screens.

    Doctoral offerings keep growing

    RIT is growing its Ph.D. offerings, adding one new program in the fall of 2023 and two in 2024. This fall, Saunders College of Business will offer a Ph.D. in business administration. In 2024, the College of Liberal Arts will introduce a new doctoral degree in cognitive science and the College of Science will launch a Ph.D. in physics.

  • February 1, 2023

    man presenting at the front of a room.

    Community members commit to diversity and inclusion

    People from across the university are helping RIT make substantial progress on the initiatives laid out in the Action Plan for Race and Ethnicity. Launched in July 2021, the plan unveiled an extensive series of initiatives designed to make RIT more diverse, equitable, and inclusive.

  • January 27, 2023

    Artistic representation of an orange neutron star spitting material into a spinning vortex.

    RIT scientists reach a milestone in the search for continuous gravitational waves

    Scientists on the hunt for a previously undetected type of gravitational waves believe they are getting close and have refined techniques to use in upcoming observational runs. Researchers from the LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA Collaboration outlined the most sensitive search to date for continuous gravitational waves from a promising source in a paper recently published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters.

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