Edwin Hach Headshot

Edwin Hach

Associate Professor

School of Physics and Astronomy
College of Science

585-475-4537
Office Location

Edwin Hach

Associate Professor

School of Physics and Astronomy
College of Science

Education

BS, MS, St. Bonaventure University; Ph.D., University of Arkansas

585-475-4537

Select Scholarship

Journal Paper
III, Edwin E. Hach,, et al. "SU(1,1) Parity and Strong Violations of a Bell Inequality by Entangled Barut-Girardello Coherent States." Journal of the Optical Society of America B35. (2018): 2433 -. Print.
Hach, Edwin E., et al. "A Quantum Optical Description of Losses in Ring Resonators based on Field Operator Transformations." Physical Review A. (2016): 1-26. Web.
Hach, Edwin E., et al. "Violations of a Bell Inequality for Entangled SU(1,1) Coherent States based on Dichotomic Observables." Physical Review A A93. (2016): 0421041--0421048. Print.
Hach, Edwin E., et al. "Violations of a Bell inequality for entangled SU(1,1) coherent states based on dichotomic observables." Physical Review A. (2015): --. Print.
Hach, Edwin E., et al. "Violations of a Bell inequality for entangled SU(1,1) coherent states based on dichotomic observables." Physical Review A. (2015): --. Print.
Published Conference Proceedings
Alsing, Paul M. and Edwin E. Hach, III. "An Optical Nonlinear Sign Shift Gate Using Mircoring Resonators." Proceedings of the Quantum Technologies and Quantum Information Science IV. Ed. Not Readily Available. Berlin, It was published in Germany!!: n.p., 2018. Print.
Hach, Edwin E. "Silicon Nanophotonic Networks for Quantum Optical Information Processing." Proceedings of the SPIE Defense+Security 2016. Baltimore, Maryland: SPIE, 2016. Print.

Currently Teaching

PHYS-790
1 - 4 Credits
Graduate-level research by the candidate on an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the research advisor.
PHYS-799
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for a graduate-level student.
PHYS-321
3 Credits
This course is a continuation of PHYS-320, serving to introduce additional mathematical tools needed to solve intermediate and upper-level physics problems. Topics include special functions, series solutions to ordinary differential equations, solutions to partial differential equations in curvilinear coordinate systems, matrix techniques, and the calculus of variations.
PHYS-612
3 Credits
This course is an advanced treatment of electrodynamics and radiation. Classical scattering theory including Mie scattering, Rayleigh scattering, and the Born approximation will be covered. Relativistic electrodynamics will be applied to charged particles in electromagnetic fields and magnetohydrodynamics.
PHYS-791
0 Credits
Graduate-level research by the candidate on an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the research advisor.
PHYS-320
3 Credits
This course serves as an introduction to the mathematical tools needed to solve intermediate and upper-level physics problems. Topics include matrix algebra, vector calculus, Fourier analysis, partial differential equations in rectangular coordinates, and an introduction to series solutions of ordinary differential equations.
PHYS-611
3 Credits
This course is a systematic treatment of electro- and magneto-statics, charges, currents, fields and potentials, dielectrics and magnetic materials, Maxwell's equations and electromagnetic waves. Field theory is treated in terms of scalar and vector potentials. Wave solutions of Maxwell's equations, the behavior of electromagnetic waves at interfaces, guided electromagnetic waves, and simple radiating systems will be covered.
ASTP-790
1 - 3 Credits
Masters-level research by the candidate on an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the research advisor.
PHYS-112
4 Credits
This course is an introduction to algebra-based physics focusing on thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and elementary topics in modern physics. Topics include heat and temperature, laws of thermodynamics, fluids, electric and magnetic forces and fields, DC electrical circuits, electromagnetic induction, opyics, the concept of the photon, and the Bohr model of the atom. The course is taught using both traditional lectures and a workshop format that integrates material traditionally found in separate lecture, recitation, and laboratory settings.
PHYS-498
1 - 3 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for student in their final two years of study.

In the News

  • October 14, 2020

    researchers in masks working in a lab.

    L3Harris becomes industry partner for RIT’s Future Photon Initiative

    RIT’s Future Photon Initiative (FPI) and L3Harris have entered into a new industry partnership to develop quantum technologies. The partners will begin developing next steps for experiments and analysis focused on quantum information processing for communication, sensing, and computing.