Michael Osier Headshot

Michael Osier

Associate Professor
Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences
College of Science

585-475-4392
Office Location
Office Mailing Address
08-1338

Michael Osier

Associate Professor
Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences
College of Science

Education

BS, University of Vermont; Ph.D., Yale University

Bio

For more information please visit the Osier Lab at RIT website.

Currently Teaching

BIOL-650
3 Credits
Students will utilize commonly used bioinformatics tools to analyze a real High Throughput Sequencing data set starting with raw data, proceeding with quality control, either aligning to a reference genome or performing de novo assembly, assessing differential gene expression determination, and finally annotating their results. Weekly lab reports will be required, and a group manuscript is expected at the end of the semester.
BIOL-495
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed student project or research involving laboratory or field work, computer modeling, or theoretical calculations that could be considered of an original nature. The level of study is appropriate for students in their final two years of study.
BIOL-798
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed, graduate level tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum.
BIOL-498
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for student in their final two years of study.
BIOL-301
1 - 4 Credits
This course allows students to assist in a class or laboratory for which they have previously earned credit. The student will assist the instructor in the operation of the course. Assistance by the student may include fielding questions, helping in workshops, and assisting in review sessions. In the case of labs, students may also be asked to help with supervising safety practices, waste manifestation, and instrumentation.
BIOL-298
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for student in their first three years of study.
BIOL-365
3 Credits
This course consists of a study of DNA, genes, inheritance, genetic variation, genetic architecture, and change within and among populations. Fundamental genetics topics include DNA, gene, and chromosomal structure and function along with, transmission genetics, Mendelian inheritance patterns, sex-linked inheritance, genetic linkage, and the Hardy-Weinberg Principle. Population based topics will include genetic variation, its importance, how it originates and is maintained as well as inbreeding, random mating, mutation, migration, selection, genetic drift, the effects of small population size, fitness, population subdivision, the shifting balance theory, inter-deme selection, kin selection, neutral theory, molecular evolution, molecular clocks, multi-gene families, gene conversion, artificial selection, the genetic basis of quantitative traits and the fundamental theorem of natural selection.
BIOL-791
0 Credits
Continuation of Thesis
BIOL-289
1 - 4 Credits
This is an intermediate course on a topic that is not part of the formal curriculum. This course is structured as an ordinary course and has specific prerequisites, contact hours, and examination procedures.
BIOL-601
3 Credits
The identification of genetic causes of disease has been one of the major modern scientific breakthroughs. This course examines a range of inherited diseases, how causative genetic variations were or are being identified, and what this means for the treatment of the diseases. Scientific literature will be utilized, both current and historical.
BIOL-189
1 - 4 Credits
This is an introductory course on a topic that is not part of the formal curriculum. This course is structured as an ordinary course and has specific prerequisites, contact hours, and examination procedures. (Permission of instructor)
BIOL-295
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed student project or research involving laboratory work, computer modeling, or theoretical calculations that could be considered of an original nature. The level of study is appropriate for students in their first three years of study.
BIOL-530
3 Credits
Bioinformatics Algorithms will focus on the types of analyses, tools, and databases that are available and commonly used in Bioinformatics. The labs will apply the lecture material in the analysis of real data through computer programming.
BIOL-630
3 Credits
Bioinformatics Algorithms will focus on the types of analyses, tools, and databases that are available and commonly used in Bioinformatics. The labs will apply the lecture material in the analysis of real data through computer programming.

Select Scholarship

Journal Paper
MV, Osier. "VitisPathways: Gene Pathway Analysis for V. Vinifera." Vitis 55. (2016): 129-133. Print.
Osier, Michael V. "A Board Game for Undergraduate Genetics Vocabulary and Concept Review: The Pathway Shuffle." Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education. (2014) Web.
Wu, X., et al. "Genes and Biochemical Pathways in Human Skeletal Muscle Affecting Resting Energy Expenditure and Fuel Partitioning." Journal of Applied Physiology 110. (2011): 746-755. Print.
Taylor, S.L., et al. "Urine Metabolomic Analysis Identifies Potential Biomarkers and Pathogenic Pathways in Kidney Cancer." OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology 15. (2011): 293-303. Print.
Invited Keynote/Presentation
Osier, Michael. "Curriculum Reflections Spawned by Semester Conversion." Undergraduate Bioinformatics Education Conference. St. Vincent College. Latrobe, PA. 30 May 2013. Keynote Speech.
Osier, Michael. "CNVs in Autism and Schizophrenia? Hype or Hope?" TIGR. University of Rochester. Rochester, NY. 20 Nov. 2013. Guest Lecture.
Published Article
Taylor S.L., S. Ganti, N.O. Bukanov, A. Chapman, O. Fiehn, M. Osier, K. Kim, and R.H. Weiss. “A metabolomics approach using juvenile cystic mice to identify urinary biomarkers and altered pathways in polycystic kidneydisease.” American Journal of Physiology Renal Physiology, 298 (2010):F909-F922. Print.