Mary-Anne Courtney Headshot

Mary-Anne Courtney

Lecturer

Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences
College of Science

585-475-7224
Office Location

Mary-Anne Courtney

Lecturer

Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences
College of Science

Education

BA, Miami University; Ph.D., University of Louisville; Postdoctoral Fellowship, University of Rochester

585-475-7224

Select Scholarship

Journal Paper
Courtney, Mary Anne and J. L. Baker, J. Branches, R.C. Faustoferri, C.L. Hubbard , J. Lemos , M.A. Courtney, R. Quivey, Jr. "Transcriptional profile of glucose-shocked and acid-adapted strains of Streptococcus mutans." Molecular Oral Microbiology 30. 6 (2015): 496-517. Print.

Currently Teaching

BIOL-206
3 Credits
This course will address the fundamental concepts of Molecular Biology. Class discussions, assignments, and projects will explore the structure and function of biologically important molecules (DNA, RNA and proteins) in a variety of cellular and molecular processes. Students in this course will explore the molecular interactions that facilitate the storage, maintenance and repair of DNA and processes that drive the flow of genetic information and evolution. Students in this course will gain an understanding of various molecular mechanisms, structure/function relationships, and processes as they relate to molecular biology. The foundational molecular concepts in this course will be built upon in a variety of upper-level biology courses.
BIOL-216
1 Credits
This laboratory course will address the fundamental concepts of Molecular Biology. Students in this laboratory will complement their understanding of core concepts in Molecular Biology through the implementation and practice of laboratory techniques used by Molecular Biologists. Laboratory techniques and projects will focus on recombinant DNA technology and the detection and tracking of biomolecules such as DNA, RNA and proteins.
BIOL-295
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed student project or research involving laboratory work, computer modeling, or theoretical calculations that could be considered of an original nature. The level of study is appropriate for students in their first three years of study.
BIOL-298
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for student in their first three years of study.
BIOL-301
1 - 4 Credits
This course allows students to assist in a class or laboratory for which they have previously earned credit. The student will assist the instructor in the operation of the course. Assistance by the student may include fielding questions, helping in workshops, and assisting in review sessions. In the case of labs, students may also be asked to help with supervising safety practices, waste manifestation, and instrumentation.
BIOL-311
4 Credits
This course is an introduction to microorganisms and their importance. Principles of structure and function, metabolic diversity, taxonomy, environmental microbiology, and infectious diseases of bacteria and human immunology are discussed. Current concepts in microbiology including microbial communities and the microbiome will also be covered. Students will learn how to read and use the primary literature for microbiology. The class will also discuss political and ethical issues associated with microbiology. Basic laboratory techniques for bacteriology will be learned. These techniques include the use of a microscope to characterize organisms that have been stained using the Gram stain or the spore stain. Students will learn to isolate individual organisms from a mixture of bacteria. Students will learn to use metabolic tests and clinical and commercial testing protocols to identify specific bacteria. Students will detect and enumerate bacteria in food and water samples. The control of bacteria will be performed by testing antibiotic resistance and determining the efficacy of various disinfectants. Finally, each student will develop a hypothesis about a microbiological topic, design experiments, perform the work in the laboratory and write a paper about their findings.
BIOL-404
3 Credits
Microbial fermentation is a hands-on course that will explore the use of fermented foods by early humans and the eventual control of the fermentative process by human culture. An understanding of the metabolism of fermenting microorganisms will be developed including an appreciation for metabolic engineering, starter cultures, and the genetic engineering of fermenting organisms. The course will also examine various fermentation processes including dairy products, cheese, meat, vegetables, bread, beer, wine, distilled spirits, vinegar, cocoa, and coffee. The course includes a laboratory component.
BIOL-471
4 Credits
This course presents the relationships between microbes and their environments, as well as techniques to study them. It will cover the diverse microbiology of different habitats, ranging from soils and aquatic environments, to anthropized and extreme environments. Topics include the roles of microbes in nutrient and biogeochemical cycles, evolutionary aspects, as well as the relationships between environmental microbes and humans with regard to health impacts and biotechnological applications. Laboratory experiments will explore the types of bacteria in different environmental samples using a range of techniques from culturing and coliform counting, to metagenomic approaches. Impacts of microbes on the environment and human health will be highlighted through biogeochemical techniques and antibiotic resistance testing.
BIOL-495
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed student project or research involving laboratory or field work, computer modeling, or theoretical calculations that could be considered of an original nature. The level of study is appropriate for students in their final two years of study.
BIOL-498
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for student in their final two years of study.
BIOL-798
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed, graduate level tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum.

In the News

  • May 13, 2021

    four cloth face masks.

    How dirty is your mask? We put it to the test  

    WHAM-TV talks to Mary-Anne Courtney, lecturer; Andre Hudson, school head; and Christy Tyler, associate professor, all in the Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences, about bacteria on cloth face masks and proper disposal of used face masks.