Niels Otani Headshot

Niels Otani

Associate Professor

School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science

585-475-5140
Office Location

Niels Otani

Associate Professor

School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science

Education

BA, University of Chicago; Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley

585-475-5140

Personal Links
Areas of Expertise

Currently Teaching

MATH-631
3 Credits
This course is a study of dynamical systems theory. Basic definitions of dynamical systems are followed by a study of maps and time series. Stability theory of solutions of differential equations is studied. Asymptotic behavior of solutions is investigated through limit sets, attractors, Poincaré–Bendixson theory, and index theory. The notion of local bifurcation is introduced and investigated. Chaotic systems are studied.
MATH-219
3 Credits
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes the study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and includes applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-221.
MATH-790
0 - 9 Credits
Masters-level research by the candidate on an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the research advisor.
MATH-498
1 - 3 Credits
This course is a faculty-guided investigation into appropriate topics that are not part of the curriculum.
MATH-331
3 Credits
The course revisits the equations of spring-mass system, RLC circuits, and pendulum systems in order to view and interpret the phase space representations of these dynamical systems. The course begins with linear systems followed by a study of the stability analysis of nonlinear systems. Matrix techniques are introduced to study higher order systems. The Lorentz equation will be studied to introduce the concept of chaotic solutions.
MATH-495
1 - 3 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed project that could be considered original in nature. The level of work is appropriate for students in their final two years of undergraduate study.

In the News