Paul Shipman Headshot

Paul Shipman

Associate Professor
Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences
College of Science

585-475-4361
Office Location

Paul Shipman

Associate Professor
Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences
College of Science

Education

BS, MS, Emporia State University; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University

585-475-4361

Currently Teaching

ENVS-791
0 Credits
Continuation of Thesis
ENVS-798
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for student in the Environmental Science graduate program.
ENVS-795
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a graduate level, faculty-directed, student project or research involving laboratory or field work, computer modeling, or theoretical calculations that could be considered of an original nature. The level of study is appropriate for students in Environmental Science graduate program.
ENVS-790
1 - 4 Credits
The thesis option will be available to environmental science graduate students only with prior written approval of program faculty. Students will submit a proposal to a faculty member who agrees to serve as the student's thesis committee chair. The proposal will describe the basic research question to be investigated and the experimental protocols to be employed. Proposals will be reviewed by the program faculty who will give permission to register for thesis credit. This course may be taken several times over the course of a student's graduate program, for variable credits. A written thesis and oral defense are required at the completion of the thesis research.
BIOL-655
3 Credits
This course is the study of the distribution of biodiversity on the earth. Patterns of past and present animal and plant distributions are used to help understand the mechanisms of basic biological processes including speciation, dispersal, divergence and extinction. This course will cover the character and history of the science of biogeography, as well as its basic principles and applications. We will also examine the assumptions, methods and conclusions of historically significant biogeographic studies.
BIOL-455
3 Credits
This course is the study of the distribution of biodiversity on the earth. Patterns of past and present animal and plant distributions are used to help understand the mechanisms of basic biological processes including speciation, dispersal, divergence, and extinction. This course will cover the character and history of the science of biogeography, as well as its basic principles and applications. We will also examine the assumptions, methods, and conclusions of historically significant biogeographic studies.
ENVS-298
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for student in their first three years of study.
BIOL-495
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed student project or research involving laboratory or field work, computer modeling, or theoretical calculations that could be considered of an original nature. The level of study is appropriate for students in their final two years of study.
BIOL-798
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed, graduate level tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum.
BIOL-498
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for student in their final two years of study.
BIOL-301
1 - 4 Credits
This course allows students to assist in a class or laboratory for which they have previously earned credit. The student will assist the instructor in the operation of the course. Assistance by the student may include fielding questions, helping in workshops, and assisting in review sessions. In the case of labs, students may also be asked to help with supervising safety practices, waste manifestation, and instrumentation.
BIOL-298
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for student in their first three years of study.
BIOL-104
1 Credits
This course provides laboratory work to complement the material of General Biology II. The experiments are designed to illustrate concepts of animal and plant anatomy and physiology, develop laboratory skills and techniques for experimenting with live organisms, and improve ability to make, record, and interpret observations.
BIOL-212
3 Credits
This course provides a synthesis of the ecological, behavioral, anatomical, and physiological characteristics of vertebrates in an evolutionary context.
BIOL-121
4 Credits
This course serves as an introduction to molecular biology, cellular biology, genetics, developmental biology, and evolutionary biology. Topics will include: a study of the basic principles of modern cellular biology, including cell structure and function; the chemical basis and functions of life, including enzyme systems and gene expression; and both the processes and patterns of the organismal development (ontogeny) and the evolution of life on Earth (phylogeny). Laboratory experiments are designed to illustrate concepts of basic cellular, molecular, developmental, and evolutionary biology, develop laboratory skills and techniques for microscopy and biotechnology, and improve ability to make, record and interpret observations.
BIOL-295
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed student project or research involving laboratory work, computer modeling, or theoretical calculations that could be considered of an original nature. The level of study is appropriate for students in their first three years of study.
BIOL-205
4 Credits
This course is a comparative study of animal behavior from an evolutionary perspective. Lectures will examine the organization of behaviors including survival behaviors, social dynamics, and human behavior. Labs will demonstrate methods of gathering and interpreting behavioral data in the laboratory and in the field.
BIOL-103
1 Credits
This course provides laboratory work to complement the lecture material of General Biology I. The experiments are designed to illustrate concepts of basic cellular and molecular biology, develop laboratory skills and techniques for microscopy, and improve ability to make, record and interpret observations.

Select Scholarship

Invited Keynote/Presentation
Shipman, Paul. "Panel One: Traditional Ecological Knowledge - Western and Native Science." Thirty-Fifth Annual National Indian Timber Symposium. Intertribal Timber Council. Black Bear Resort and Casino, Carlton, MN. 14 Jun. 2011. Conference Presentation.
Shipman, Paul and Robyn Wilson. "Plant Knowledge Roundtable - Cherokee Plant Database." Traditional Ecological Knowledge Conference. University of New Hampshire. The Browne Center, Durham, NH. 23 Sep. 2011. Conference Presentation.
Formal Presentation
Shipman, Paul. “Coexistence of Western and NativeScience.” Seminar for the Environmental Science Program. Colgate University, NY. 19 Feb. 2010. Presentation.
Shipman, Paul. “A Native Science Wiki.” 33rd Annual National Conference, American Indian Science and Engineering Society.Albuquerque, NM. 12 Nov. 2010. Presentation. †
Shipman, Paul. “Science and Culture: How weaving traditional knowledge and culture into science can broaden participation and transform understandings.” Geoscience Alliance 2010 Conference. Carlton, MN. 17 Sept. 2010. Presentation.