Tamas Wiandt Headshot

Tamas Wiandt

Professor
School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science
Undergraduate Program Coordinator

585-475-5767
Office Hours
2195: TTh 11am-12:40pm
Office Location

Tamas Wiandt

Professor
School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science
Undergraduate Program Coordinator

Education

BS, Jozsef Attila University (Hungary); Ph.D., University of Minnesota

585-475-5767

Areas of Expertise

Currently Teaching

MATH-501
0 Credits
The experiential learning requirement in the Applied Mathematics and Computational Mathematics programs can be accomplished in various ways. This course exists to record the completion of experiential learning activities that have been pre-approved by the School of Mathematical Sciences. Such pre-approval is considered on a case-by-case basis.
MATH-431
3 Credits
This course is an investigation and extension of the theoretical aspects of elementary calculus. Topics include mathematical induction, real numbers, sequences, functions, limits, and continuity. The workshop will focus on helping students develop skill in writing proofs.
MATH-499
0 Credits
This course is a cooperative education experience for undergraduate students majoring in Applied Mathematics, Computational Mathematics or Statistics.
MATH-261
3 Credits
This course examines concepts in finance from a mathematical viewpoint. It includes topics such as the Black-Scholes model, financial derivatives, the binomial model, and an introduction to stochastic calculus. Although the course is mathematical in nature, only a background in calculus (including Taylor series) and basic probability is assumed; other mathematical concepts and numerical methods are introduced as needed.
MATH-241
3 Credits
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of linear algebra, and techniques of matrix manipulation. Topics include linear transformations, Gaussian elimination, matrix arithmetic, determinants, vector spaces, linear independence, basis, null space, row space, and column space of a matrix, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, change of basis, similarity and diagonalization. Various applications are studied throughout the course.
MATH-199
1 Credits
This course introduces the programs within the School of Mathematical Sciences, and provides an introduction to math and statistics software. The course provides practice in technical writing.
MATH-498
1 - 3 Credits
This course is a faculty-guided investigation into appropriate topics that are not part of the curriculum.
MATH-251
3 Credits
This course introduces sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability and independence, distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions (discrete and continuous), the central limit theorem, descriptive statistics, interval estimation, and applications of probability and statistics to real-world problems. A statistical package such as Minitab or R is used for data analysis and statistical applications.
MATH-735
3 Credits
This is the first course in a sequence that examines mathematical and statistical models in finance. By taking a mathematical viewpoint the course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the assumptions and limitations of the quantitative models used in finance. Topics include probability rules and distributions, the binomial and Black-Scholes models of derivative pricing, interest and present value, and ARCH and GARCH time series techniques. The course is mathematical in nature and assumes a background in calculus (including Taylor series), linear algebra and basic probability. Other mathematical concepts and numerical methods are introduced as needed.

Select Scholarship

Published Article
Mochan, Ericka, C.D. Buenger, and T. Wiandt. “Coexistence ofstable ECM solutions in the Lang—Kobayashisystem.” Involve, 3.3 (2010): 259-271. Print. É  *
Formal Presentation
Wiandt, Tamas. “Bifurcations in the Lang-Kobayashi system.” MAA Seaway Meeting. Oswego, NY. 24 April 2010. Presentation.
Wiandt, Tamas. “Attraction Intensities for Closed Relations on Hausdorff Spaces” AMS Sectional Meeting. Syracuse, NY. 10 March 2010. Presentation.