Jeremy Brown Headshot

Jeremy Brown

Lecturer
Department of Computer Science
Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences

585-475-4523
Office Location

Jeremy Brown

Lecturer
Department of Computer Science
Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences

Education

BS in Computer Science, RIT; MS in Information Technology Management, Florida Institute of Technology

585-475-4523

Areas of Expertise
Computer networks
Databases (relational and noSQL)
Operating systems
Computer languages
Computer Science education

Currently Teaching

CSCI-320
3 Credits
This course provides a broad introduction to the principles and practice of modern data management, with an emphasis on the relational database model. Topics in relational database systems include data modeling; the relational model; relational algebra; Structured Query Language (SQL); and data quality, transactions, integrity and security. Students will also learn approaches to building relational database application programs. Additional topics include object-oriented and object-relational databases; semi-structured databases (such as XML); and information retrieval. A database project is required.
CSCI-251
3 Credits
This course is an introduction to the organization and programming of systems comprising multiple computers. Topics include the organization of multi-core computers, parallel computer clusters, computing grids, client-server systems, and peer-to-peer systems; computer networks and network protocols; network security; multi-threaded programming; and network programming. Programming projects will be required.
CSCI-471
3 Credits
This course focuses on developing and improving verbal and written communication skills specific to the discipline of computer science. Topics include the different forms of writing in computer science (books, theses, journal articles, technical reports, manuscripts, etc.), writing styles of computer scientists, document readability and usability, documents for career readiness, effective presentations, teamwork and peer review, research methods, experimentation, documenting mathematics and algorithms, proper formatting of graphs, figures, and tables, and ethical, social, and professional issues facing Computer Scientists. This course is approved as Writing Intensive.
CSCI-351
3 Credits
This course is an in-depth study of data communications and networks. The course covers design of, and algorithms and protocols used in, the physical, data link, network, transport, and application layers in the Internet; methods for modeling and analyzing networks, including graphs, graph algorithms, and discrete event simulation; and an introduction to network science. Programming projects will be required.
CSCI-141
4 Credits
This course serves as an introduction to computational thinking using a problem-centered approach. Specific topics covered include: expression of algorithms in pseudo code and a programming language; functional and imperative programming techniques; control structures; problem solving using recursion; basic searching and sorting; elementary data structures such as lists, trees, and graphs; and correctness, testing and debugging. Assignments (both in class and for homework) requiring a pseudo code solution and an implementation are an integral part of the course. An end-of-term project is also required.
CSCI-641
3 Credits
The goal of this course is to introduce the students to a programming paradigm and an appropriate programming language chosen from those that are currently important or that show high promise of becoming important. A significant portion of the learning curve occurs through programming assignments with exemplary solutions discussed later in class. The instructor will post specifics prior to registration. With the approval of the program coordinator, the course can be taken for credit more than once, provided each instance deals with a different paradigm and language. A term project involving independent investigation is also required. Note: students who complete CSCI-541 may not take CSCI-641 for credit.
CSCI-541
3 Credits
The goal of this course is to introduce the students to a programming paradigm and an appropriate programming language chosen from those that are currently important or that show high promise of becoming important. A significant portion of the learning curve occurs through programming assignments with exemplary solutions discussed later in class. The instructor will post specifics prior to registration. With the approval of the program coordinator, the course can be taken for credit more than once, provided each instance deals with a different paradigm and language.
ISEE-200
3 Credits
A first course in computational problem solving for engineers. Students will learn the theory necessary to develop algorithms to solve computational problems in the engineering disciplines. Topics include: program design and implementation, integrated development environment, mathematical operations, file input/output, data manipulations, functions, and arrays. Course also covers an introduction to implementing object-oriented programming and graphical user interface.