Anne Royston Headshot

Anne Royston

Assistant Professor

Department of English
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-4456
Office Location

Anne Royston

Assistant Professor

Department of English
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BA, Williams College; MA, Ph.D., University of Utah

Bio

Recent Publications:

Material Noise: Reading Theory as Artist's Book (forthcoming), MIT Press, fall 2019

'Between Page and Screen, Hands: Print-digital works and their Embodied Readers' (forthcoming), Trace journal, fall 2018

'De-Black Boxing Media: The Technological Feminine in Avital Ronell's The Telephone Book,' Camera Obscura 97, 2017

Courses Taught:

  • English 215 (Text & Code)
  • Digital Humanities 377 (Media Narrative)
  • English 210 (Literature, Culture, & Media)
  • English 150 (Future of Writing)
585-475-4456

Currently Teaching

ENGL-309
3 Credits
This course explores the evolution of an influential literary form ( the short story, drama, poetry, autobiographical literature, or the novel). Reading a series of variations on this literary form, likely bridging cultural or historical contexts or themes, the course develops critical perspectives and artistic insights into this genre of writing. Criticism and theory appropriate to the genre will be discussed as a way to understand the form, its social functions, and its cultural and political significance. The course can be taken up to two times, for a total of 6 semester credit hours, as long as the topics are different.
ENGL-210
3 Credits
Students will study literary and cultural texts selected from traditional literature to contemporary media and culture (including mythology, poetry, plays, novels, film, graphic novels, television, and digital literature). Students will analyze these texts from a variety of perspectives and become familiar with the history of debates about literature and/or culture as arenas of human experience. Individual sections will vary in their foci.
ENGL-301
3 Credits
This course emphasizes the enjoyment and study of poetry with primary attention to major poetry in English. Students will develop (and apply) a working vocabulary of the concepts and terminology used to discuss and analyze poetry, through close readings of individual poems, lectures on specific poets, and theories of poetics.