Deborah Blizzard Headshot

Deborah Blizzard

Professor
Department of Science, Technology, and Society
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-4697
Office Location

Deborah Blizzard

Professor
Department of Science, Technology, and Society
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BA, Smith College; MS, Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Bio

B.A. Government, Smith College

Independent Study Abroad, Edinburgh University (UK)
M.S. Science and Technology Studies, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Ph.D. Science and Technology Studies, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Post Doctoral Studies, Bioethics, University of Pennsylvania

Research Interests: sociocultural construction of fetoscopy (in utero fetal surgery); bereavement and hope in partially lost twin gestations; cultural analysis of contemporary close-up magic; (re) creation of the human-machine relationship through erotic dolls, feminist pedagogy; gender studies

Courses: Science, Technology and Values; Biomedical Issues: Science and Technology; Cyborg Theory: (Re)Thinking the Human Experience in the 21st Century; Gender, Science and Technology; Reality TV and the Construction of Reality; Magic, Science and Technology; Sexuality, Medicine, Science and Technology

585-475-4697

Currently Teaching

STSO-441
3 Credits
The developing cybernetic organism or cyborg challenges traditional concepts of what it means to be human. Today medical science and science fiction appear to merge in ways unimagined a century ago. By exploring scientific and cultural theories, science fiction, and public experience, this class examines the history and potential of the cyborg in Western cultures.
STSO-341
3 Credits
A study of the impact of science and technology on life, our view of life and of the value issues that arise from this impact.
STSO-140
3 Credits
This course explores the concepts and effects of science and technology on society, analyzes the relationship between science and technology, examines how each has come to play a major role today, and looks at how science and technology have affected and been affected by our values. This course also considers the environmental aspects of science and technology. Science and technology are often assumed to be value free, yet people, guided by individual and societal values, develop the science and technology. In turn, the choices people make among the opportunities provided by science and technology are guided by their individual values.