Eric Hittinger Headshot

Eric Hittinger

Associate Professor
Department of Public Policy
College of Liberal Arts

Eric Hittinger

Associate Professor
Department of Public Policy
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BS, MS, Case Western Reserve University; Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University

Bio

Eric Hittinger holds a Ph.D. is in Engineering and Public Policy from Carnegie Mellon University, and a MS in Macromolecular Science and BS in Polymer Science and Engineering from Case Western Reserve University.

Professor Hittinger has a background in electricity system policy, operation, and economics, with a focus on understanding the benefits and limitations of energy storage and renewable electricity sources. His research often uses techno-economic modeling of electricity systems to understand the effects of system policies and interactions.

Research Gate Profile

Google Scholar Profile

Current Research:

Dr. Hittinger is addressing longstanding challenges in both the economic and environmental feasibility of electricity production in the United States. With funding from the National Science Foundation, he and other RIT researchers are providing new avenues for policymakers to develop policies to promote the advancement of low-carbon energy technologies.

Dr. Hittinger is working to help policymakers deal with the uncertainty of political and economic change by altering the models currently used to understand the evolution of the electricity system. While most extant models employ fixed inputs to account for variables, such as the price of natural gas, Dr. Hittinger’s model utilizes a range possible inputs. By accounting for economic, political, and technological changes, Dr. Hittinger is creating a better approach for making decisions about how to support renewable energy development.

Courses:

Energy Policy, Policy Analysis, Decision Analysis, Climate Change

Currently Teaching

CHEM-531
3 Credits
This multidisciplinary course will provide students with diverse perspectives on global climate change issues, providing a survey of important aspects of the problem. Topics include atmospheric chemistry, climate modeling, ecological impacts and feedbacks, economics of climate change, international climate policies, and social and environmental justice. The course will include a variety of instructors and guest lecturers, providing an overview of the complex and inter-related nature of global climate change.
ENVS-631
3 Credits
This multidisciplinary course will provide students with diverse perspectives on global climate change issues, providing a survey of important aspects of the problem augmented by readings in the primary literature. Topics include atmospheric chemistry, climate modeling, ecological impacts and feedbacks, economics of climate change, international climate policies, and social and environmental justice. The course will include a variety of instructors and guest lecturers, providing an overview of the complex and inter-related nature of global climate change. The course will culminate in a project based on finding solutions to the real-world problem of climate change. Students will be required to take a leadership role in bridging the multiple disciplines presented
ISUS-790
1 - 6 Credits
Independent research in sustainability leading to the completion of the MS thesis. This course requires a formal proposal and a faculty sponsor.
ENVS-531
3 Credits
This multidisciplinary course will provide students with diverse perspectives on global climate change issues, providing a survey of important aspects of the problem. Topics include atmospheric chemistry, climate modeling, ecological impacts and feedbacks, economics of climate change, international climate policies, and social and environmental justice. The course will include a variety of instructors and guest lecturers, providing an overview of the complex and inter-related nature of global climate change.
PUBL-702
3 Credits
This course provides students with an introduction to decision science and analysis. The course focuses on several important tools for making good decisions, including decision trees, including forecasting, risk analysis, and multi-attribute decision making. Students will apply these tools to contemporary public policy decision making at the local, state, federal, and international levels.
PUBL-531
3 Credits
This multidisciplinary course will provide students with diverse perspectives on global climate change issues, providing a survey of important aspects of the problem. Topics include atmospheric chemistry, climate modeling, ecological impacts and feedbacks, economics of climate change, international climate policies, and social and environmental justice. The course will include a variety of instructors and guest lecturers, providing an overview of the complex and inter-related nature of global climate change.
PUBL-790
1 - 6 Credits
The master's thesis in science, technology, and public policy requires the student to select a thesis topic, advisor and committee; prepare a written thesis proposal for approval by the faculty; present and defend the thesis before a thesis committee; and submit a bound copy of the thesis to the library and to the program chair.
PUBL-631
3 Credits
This multidisciplinary course will provide students with diverse perspectives on global climate change issues, providing a survey of important aspects of the problem augmented by readings in the primary literature. Topics include atmospheric chemistry, climate modeling, ecological impacts and feedbacks, economics of climate change, international climate policies, and social and environmental justice. The course will include a variety of instructors and guest lecturers, providing an overview of the complex and interrelated nature of global climate change. The course will culminate in a project based on finding solutions to the real-world problem of climate change. Students will be required to take a leadership role in bridging the multiple disciplines presented.
PUBL-302
3 Credits
This course provides students with an introduction to decision science and analysis. The course focuses on several important tools for making good decisions, including forecasting, risk analysis, and multi-attribute decision making. Students will apply these tools to contemporary public policy decision making at the local, state, federal, and international levels.
PUBL-810
3 Credits
This course introduces students to public policy and its role in building a sustainable society. The course places particular emphasis on the policy process; the relationship among technology, policy, and the environment; and policy mechanisms for addressing market and government failures that threaten sustainability.
ISUS-890
1 - 9 Credits
Research fulfillment of Sustainability Ph.D. dissertation requirements.

Latest News

Select Scholarship

Journal Paper
Hittinger, Eric, et al. "Evaluating the Value of Batteries in Microgrid Electricity Systems Using an Improved Energy Systems Model." Energy Conversion and Management. 89 (2015): 458-472. Print.
Hittinger, Eric and Roger Lueken. "Is Inexpensive Natural Gas Hindering the Grid Energy Storage Industry?" Energy Policy. 87 (2015): 140-152. Print.
Hittinger, Eric S. and Inês M. L. Azevedo. "Bulk Energy Storage Increases US Electricity System Emissions." Environmental Science and Technology 49. 5 (2015): 3203-3210. Print.
Hittinger, E., et al. "Profitability of CCS with Flue Gas Bypass and Solvent Storage." International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 27. (2014): 279-288. Print.