Grant Cos Headshot

Grant Cos

Professor

School of Communication
College of Liberal Arts
Program Director- Journalism

585-475-6646
Office Location

Grant Cos

Professor

School of Communication
College of Liberal Arts
Program Director- Journalism

Education

BA, University of Massachusetts at Amherst; MA, Emerson College; Ph.D., Kent State University

Bio

Professor Cos teaches a variety of different courses in the School of Communication. His research interests center on the Aristotelian trilogy of politics, ethics and rhetoric. Specifically, these interests have manifested themselves into the study of mediated speechmaking and political campaigning, 'mash-up' online advertisements and politics, and contemporary instances of dissent during wartime.

Positions held

Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology, 2017-
Associate Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology, 2007-2017
Assistant Professor of Communication, Rochester Institute of Technology - 1999-2005
Assistant Professor, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, 1996-1999

Courses offered

  • Human Communication
  • Public Speaking
  • Interpersonal Communication
  • Persuasion
  • Survey of Media Technologies
  • Qualitative Research Methodology
  • Political Communication
  • Communication Law & Ethics
  • Media Law & Ethics
585-475-6646

Select Scholarship

Published Article
Jenkins, Keith B., and Grant Cos. “A Time for Change and a Candidate’s Voice: Pragmatism and the Rhetoric of Inclusion in Barack Obama’s 2008 Presidential Campaign.” American Behavioral Scientist, 54.3 (2010): 184-202. Print.

Currently Teaching

DHSS-377
3 Credits
The contemporary understanding of communication and narrative is quickly shifting in a world where media is ubiquitous. The "language of new media" is the thematic used in this course to discuss contemporary and historic forms of non-linear narrative. Students will explore the properties of non-linear, multi-linear, and interactive forms of narratives. This course will survey some of the possibilities, examining both traditional and new media such as oral storytelling, literature, poetry, visual arts, museum exhibits, architecture, hypertext fiction, Net Art, and computer games. Writers on communication culture, gaming, television, digital aesthetics, contemporary art and film, as well as synchronic narrative will be addressed. The focus is to develop critical tools to analyze contemporary media as well as a minimal level of practical implementation. Students will produce a final media project.
ITDL-151H
3 Credits
This honors seminar is a foundational course that examines how our social worlds are linked to our natural and built worlds. The corresponding emphasis on inquiry, analysis, and interpretation facilitates student-engaged learning. In exploring pertinent place and space related issues/topics through an experiential, active, and site-specific curricular focused learning, various aspects of the human condition are discovered. The theme or topic of this honors seminar, as chosen by the instructor, is announced in the subtitle as well as course notes and is developed in the syllabus. The honors seminar integrates the required Year One curriculum.
COMM-342
3 Credits
This course examines major principles and trends in communication law. The course analyzes a broad range of issues related to the First Amendment, intellectual property, and media regulation. Special attention is paid to discussing the major ethical perspectives and issues surrounding contemporary communication behavior.
COMM-402
3 Credits
Introduction to the methods and ethics of qualitative and critical research. Students are introduced to interviewing, participant observation, naturalistic study, and ethnography. They also develop a disciplined ability for the critical appraisal of public discourse, cultural phenomenon, and designed objects. Both qualitative and critical research methods rely on the researcher's observational, analytic, and critical skills, and seek to understand the behaviors, beliefs, values, attitudes, assumptions, rituals, and symbol systems that characterize relationships between the source, message, media, and audience of specific communication acts. Students will also investigate the processes of rhetorical action. By the end of the course, students will have developed a research proposal suitable for implementation as the senior thesis in communication. This course should be taken during the student's third year.
COMM-261
3 Credits
This course presents the history of American journalism from colonial times to the present, including the advance of press freedom under the First Amendment and how it has affected the development of American media. The influences of Europe, colonial politics in America, national expansion, urbanization, war, and technology are further developed. Journalism’s relationship to politics, institutions, and culture will be investigated. Newspaper, magazine, and broadcast industries will be examined for ideas that have changed American journalism.
COMM-101
3 Credits
An introduction to the theoretical and conceptual underpinnings of oral, visual, and written communication. Introduces basic communication models, the role of language in communication, symbols and symbol making, issues of audience analysis, and the development of different modes of discourse. Also explores the history of communication and introduces students to basic principles and research in communication studies.

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