Jessica Lieberman Headshot

Jessica Lieberman

Associate Professor

Department of Performing Arts
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-4721
Office Location
Office Mailing Address
1-3230

Jessica Lieberman

Associate Professor

Department of Performing Arts
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BA, University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Michigan

585-475-4721

Currently Teaching

DHSS-489
3 Credits
This course is intended for students in the DHSS program to produce critical and creative projects that apply digital technologies to a field of inquiry in the humanities and/or social sciences, while being guided by faculty advisors. Students will acquire a client (faculty member, not-for-profit organization, or cultural heritage site) and will be supervised by the advisor as they develop the research agenda, develop the project management plan, construct all necessary IRB materials, intellectual property documents, and copyright permissions, and develop a working prototype. This course will culminate in an online publishable project and a written rationale with theoretical grounding, as well as explanation of practical decisions and applications. It is expected that the project will be somewhat novel, will extend the theoretical understanding of previous work, and go well beyond any similar projects that they might have contributed to in any of their previous courses. The 6-hour course sequence is designed to be distributed over two consecutive semesters in order to allow for long-term, in-depth development of projects.
FNRT-377
3 Credits
This course examines the ways in which culture, ethnicity, languages, traditions, governance, policies and histories interact in the production of the visual experience. We will approach the campus of RIT and the city of Rochester and their various urban spatial forms as image experiences, subject to interpretative strategies and the influence of other discourses. We will wander the well-traveled and the unbeaten paths, participating in and interrogating a wide range of our campus' and city's treasures and embarrassments, secrets and norms. In addition to these field trips, we will be reading from literature and cultural studies, as well as viewing films, advertisements and websites, and possibly attending theatrical and music performances or sporting events.
FNRT-777
3 Credits
FNRT-777 is a graduate-level counterpart to FNRT-477. Students enrolled under the 777 number will be required to read the City and Culture Reader in addition to regular course readings; meet with the professor outside of class for an additional weekly discussion; and produce a final project that connects with their thesis work. Examining the ways in which culture, ethnicity, languages, traditions, governance, policies and histories interact in the production of the visual experience, graduate level students will approach the campus of RIT and the city of Rochester and their various urban spatial forms as image experiences, subject to interpretative strategies and the influence of other discourses. We will wander the well-traveled and the unbeaten paths, participating in and interrogating a wide range of our campus’ and city’s treasures and embarrassments, secrets and norms. In addition to these field trips, we will be reading from literature and cultural studies, as well as viewing films, advertisements and websites, and possibly attending theatrical and music performances or sporting events.
ITDL-498
0 Credits
Co-op in a field related to Liberal Arts (at least 80 hours). Students will apply the accumulated knowledge, theory, and methods of the discipline to problem solving outside of the classroom.
DHSS-490
3 Credits
This course is intended for students in the DHSS program to produce critical and creative projects that apply digital technologies to a field of inquiry in the humanities and/or social sciences, while being guided by faculty advisors. Students will acquire a client (faculty member, not-for-profit organization, or cultural heritage site) and will be supervised by the advisor as they develop the research agenda, develop the project management plan, construct all necessary IRB materials, intellectual property documents, and copyright permissions, and develop a working prototype. This course will culminate in an online publishable project and a written rationale with theoretical grounding, as well as explanation of practical decisions and applications. It is expected that the project will be somewhat novel, will extend the theoretical understanding of previous work, and go well beyond any similar projects that they might have contributed to in any of their previous courses. The 6-hour course sequence is designed to be distributed over two consecutive semesters in order to allow for long-term, in-depth development of projects.

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