Jessica Lieberman Headshot

Jessica Lieberman

Associate Professor
Department of Performing Arts and Visual Culture
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-4721
Office Location
Office Mailing Address
1-3230

Jessica Lieberman

Associate Professor
Department of Performing Arts and Visual Culture
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BA, University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Michigan

585-475-4721

Currently Teaching

FNRT-377
3 Credits
This course examines the ways in which culture, ethnicity, languages, traditions, governance, policies and histories interact in the production of the visual experience. We will approach the campus of RIT and the city of Rochester and their various urban spatial forms as image experiences, subject to interpretative strategies and the influence of other discourses. We will wander the well-traveled and the unbeaten paths, participating in and interrogating a wide range of our campus' and city's treasures and embarrassments, secrets and norms. In addition to these field trips, we will be reading from literature and cultural studies, as well as viewing films, advertisements and websites, and possibly attending theatrical and music performances or sporting events.
FNRT-384
3 Credits
This course explores the experience of dying a profoundly human and universal experience as it is represented by artists who are themselves facing immanent death. The unique and deeply personal process of each dying artist is crucially informed by social, cultural and historical as well as artistic contexts. The course will focus primarily on visual artists and writers living with and dying of disease - such as AIDS, cancer and cystic fibrosis as well as mortality and age. Topics such as aesthetics, artistic media, representation, grief, bereavement, illness, care-giving, aging, and the dying process will be considered within the context of issues of race, class, ethnicity, sexuality, gender and community values. Some of the artists covered will be Jo Spence, Hannah Wilke, Elias Canetti, Bob Flanagan, Herve Guibert, Tom Joslin, Laurie Lynd, Audre Lorde, Charlotte Salomon, Keith Haring, Frida Kahlo, Bas Jan Ader, Ted Rosenthal, Felix Gonzalez Torres, Keith Haring, Eric Steel, Derek Jarman, Eric Michaels, and David Wojnarowicz. We will also explore some of the critical theory of Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Elaine Scarry, Susan Sontag, and Ross Chambers.
FNRT-599
1 - 12 Credits
A program of study executed by an individual student with assistance and guidance by an instructor, outside a classroom setting. Guidelines for designing and gaining approval for an independent study are provided in College of Liberal Arts Policy I.D.
WGST-384
3 Credits
This course explores the experience of dying a profoundly human and universal experience as it is represented by artists who are themselves facing immanent death. The unique and deeply personal process of each dying artist is crucially informed by social, cultural and historical as well as artistic contexts. The course will focus primarily on visual artists and writers living with and dying of disease - such as AIDS, cancer and cystic fibrosis as well as mortality and age. Topics such as aesthetics, artistic media, representation, grief, bereavement, illness, care-giving, aging, and the dying process will be considered within the context of issues of race, class, ethnicity, sexuality, gender and community values. Some of the artists covered will be Jo Spence, Hannah Wilke, Elias Canetti, Bob Flanagan, Herve Guibert, Tom Joslin, Laurie Lynd, Audre Lorde, Charlotte Salomon, Keith Haring, Frida Kahlo, Bas Jan Ader, Ted Rosenthal, Felix Gonzalez Torres, Keith Haring, Eric Steel, Derek Jarman, Eric Michaels, and David Wojnarowicz. We will also explore some of the critical theory of Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Elaine Scarry, Susan Sontag, and Ross Chambers.
DHSS-489
3 Credits
This course is intended for students in the DHSS program to produce critical and creative projects that apply digital technologies to a field of inquiry in the humanities and/or social sciences, while being guided by faculty advisors. Students will acquire a client (faculty member, not-for-profit organization, or cultural heritage site) and will be supervised by the advisor as they develop the research agenda, develop the project management plan, construct all necessary IRB materials, intellectual property documents, and copyright permissions, and develop a working prototype. This course will culminate in an online publishable project and a written rationale with theoretical grounding, as well as explanation of practical decisions and applications. It is expected that the project will be somewhat novel, will extend the theoretical understanding of previous work, and go well beyond any similar projects that they might have contributed to in any of their previous courses. The 6-hour course sequence is designed to be distributed over two consecutive semesters in order to allow for long-term, in-depth development of projects.
DHSS-490
3 Credits
This course is intended for students in the DHSS program to produce critical and creative projects that apply digital technologies to a field of inquiry in the humanities and/or social sciences, while being guided by faculty advisors. Students will acquire a client (faculty member, not-for-profit organization, or cultural heritage site) and will be supervised by the advisor as they develop the research agenda, develop the project management plan, construct all necessary IRB materials, intellectual property documents, and copyright permissions, and develop a working prototype. This course will culminate in an online publishable project and a written rationale with theoretical grounding, as well as explanation of practical decisions and applications. It is expected that the project will be somewhat novel, will extend the theoretical understanding of previous work, and go well beyond any similar projects that they might have contributed to in any of their previous courses. The 6-hour course sequence is designed to be distributed over two consecutive semesters in order to allow for long-term, in-depth development of projects.
DHSS-377
3 Credits
The contemporary understanding of communication and narrative is quickly shifting in a world where media is ubiquitous. The "language of new media" is the thematic used in this course to discuss contemporary and historic forms of non-linear narrative. Students will explore the properties of non-linear, multi-linear, and interactive forms of narratives. This course will survey some of the possibilities, examining both traditional and new media such as oral storytelling, literature, poetry, visual arts, museum exhibits, architecture, hypertext fiction, Net Art, and computer games. Writers on communication culture, gaming, television, digital aesthetics, contemporary art and film, as well as synchronic narrative will be addressed. The focus is to develop critical tools to analyze contemporary media as well as a minimal level of practical implementation. Students will produce a final media project.
DHSS-499
0 Credits
A semester or summer-length experience in a professional setting related to the digital humanities and social sciences major, with a minimum of 350 hours.