Jessamy Comer Headshot

Jessamy Comer

Lecturer
Department of Psychology
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-7429
Office Location

Jessamy Comer

Lecturer
Department of Psychology
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BA, Baylor University; MA, Ph.D., University of Rochester

Bio

Dr. Comer joined the psychology department of RIT in fall 2012. She received her BA in psychology from Baylor University, and she received her MA and Ph.D. in developmental psychology from the University of Rochester. She is a lecturer and teaches a variety of courses in the department, such as Introduction to Psychology, Abnormal Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Learning and Behavior, Psychotherapy, Social and Emotional Development, and Advanced Developmental Psychology. Her areas of research interest include adolescent development, autonomy development, and parent-child relationships.

585-475-7429

Currently Teaching

PSYC-101
3 Credits
Introduction to the field of psychology. Provides a survey of basic concepts, theories, and research methods. Topics include: thinking critically with psychological science; neuroscience and behavior; sensation and perception; learning; memory; thinking, language, and intelligence; motivation and emotion; personality; psychological disorders and therapy; and social psychology.
PSYC-713
3 Credits
This course is designed to enhance students' knowledge and skills with regard to infant, child, and adolescent development. We will examine a variety of topics that relate to the physical, cognitive, and social-emotional development of children and adolescents in the context of classic and current theory. We will also explore issues such as attachment, resiliency, and policy issues that pertain to positive child and adolescent development. Students will gain an enhanced knowledge of the sequence of child development and the processes that underlie it by studying child development from a chronological approach. Theories that discuss the various domains of development will be examined through each age period. This course will emphasize the interdependence of all domains of development and contribute to an appreciation of the interrelatedness of theory, research, and applications.
PSYC-235
3 Credits
This course covers topics in learning such as non-associative learning, classical conditioning, instrumental conditioning, stimulus control of behavior, reinforcement, generalization and discrimination, and observational learning. Topics on learning and behavior in non-human animals may also be covered.
PSYC-221
3 Credits
This course will serve as an introduction to the study of psychopathology and mental illness. The course examines the major categories of mental disorder not only from the descriptive point of view, but also in terms of the major theoretical explanations of the causes of disorder. The major treatment modalities also are covered.
PSYC-510
3 Credits
This course is intended for students in the psychology major to demonstrate experimental research expertise, while being guided by faculty advisors. The topic to be studied is up to the student, who must find a faculty advisor before signing up for the course. Students will be supervised by the advisor as they conduct their literature review, develop the research question or hypothesis, develop the study methodology and materials, construct all necessary IRB materials, run subjects, and analyze the results of their study. This course will culminate in an APA style paper and poster presentation reporting the results of the research. Because Senior Project is the culmination of a student’s scientific research learning experience in the psychology major, it is expected that the project will be somewhat novel, will extend the theoretical understanding of their previous work (or of the previous work of another researcher), and go well beyond any similar projects that they might have done in any of their previous courses.
PSYC-401
3 Credits
This course is intended for students in the psychology major to develop experimental research expertise and put into practice some of what is learned in Research Methods I and II. Students will explore topics of interest for further research in psychology. They will develop one research idea that could either form the basis for a senior project in psychology or is a valid test of a research idea. Students will be supervised by the course instructor as they develop a research question, conduct a literature review, write the introduction, and examine questions about control, validity and reliability. This course will culminate in a research proposal. Students going on to Senior Project in Psychology can use this as a proposal course and must find their faculty adviser for senior project before they finish this course. Students who are not planning for Senior Project will practice writing a proposal and the related skills required to critically examine an advanced topic in Psychology.

Select Scholarship

Invited Keynote/Presentation
Comer, J., et al. "Japanese Adolescents Justifications and Strategies for Nondisclosure to Parents and Their Association with Depressed Mood." Bi-annual meeting of the Society for Research on Adolescence. Society for Research on Adolescence. Austin, TX. 20 Mar. 2014. Conference Presentation. *
Journal Paper
Comer, J., et al. "Japanese Adolescents Disclosure to Parents and Well-being: The Role of Family Decision-making and Domain of Activity." Child Development 85. (2014): 901-907. Print. «