Jeffrey Burnette Headshot

Jeffrey Burnette

Assistant Professor

Department of Sociology and Anthropology
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-2807
Office Location

Jeffrey Burnette

Assistant Professor

Department of Sociology and Anthropology
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BA, State University of Albany; MA, Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo

Bio

Jeffrey Burnette is an assistant professor of economics in the department of sociology and anthropology at Rochester Institute of Technology. His research is in the areas of education, race and inequality with a focus on understanding their intersection with American Indian and Alaska Native identity. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the State University of New York University (SUNY) at Buffalo in 2005 and a Bachelor of Arts in economics from the SUNY at Albany.

585-475-2807

Personal Links

Select Scholarship

Journal Paper
Burnette, Jeffrey D., Jason T. Younker, and David P. Wick. "Statistical Termination or Fewer Self-Identified Students: What Is Causing the Decline in American Indian and Alaska Native College Enrollments?" Journal of Economics, Race, and Policy. (2020): 1-20. Web.
Burnette, Jeffrey D. and Weiwei Zhang. "Distributional Differences and the Native American Gender Wage Gap." Economies 7. 2 (2019): 46. Web.
Burnette, Jeffrey D. "Inequality in the Labor Market for Native American Women and the Great Recession." American Economic Review 107. 7 (2017): 425-29. Print.
Invited Article/Publication
Burnette, Jeffrey D. "Equal Pay Day and Data Equality for Native American Women." Washington Center for Equitable Growth. (2018). Web.

Currently Teaching

ANTH-265
3 Credits
This course will examine the parallels of anthropological works and resulting government policies in the late-19th and 20th centuries as they relate to the genre of Native Americans film, both popular and ethnographic works. In addition, an extensive regional and historical literature review will complement the possible films.
ANTH-260
3 Credits
This course examines the persistence and change in Native American cultures using archaeological, ethnohistorical, socioeconomic, ethnographic, linguistic, and autobiographical sources among others. In addition to broad regional and historical coverage, we will read about and discuss culture change, colonialism, federal law, gender, race, and places in Native American contexts. Our goal is to understand the lived experiences of Indian people and the many forces that shape Native American lives.