Jeffrey Burnette Headshot

Jeffrey Burnette

Assistant Professor
Department of Sociology and Anthropology
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-2807
Office Location

Jeffrey Burnette

Assistant Professor
Department of Sociology and Anthropology
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BA, State University of Albany; MA, Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo

Bio

Jeffrey Burnette is an assistant professor of economics in the department of sociology and anthropology at Rochester Institute of Technology. His research is in the areas of education, race and inequality with a focus on understanding their intersection with American Indian and Alaska Native identity. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the State University of New York University (SUNY) at Buffalo in 2005 and a Bachelor of Arts in economics from the SUNY at Albany.

585-475-2807

Personal Links

Currently Teaching

SOCI-102
3 Credits
Sociology is the study of the social world and socialization processes. Sociologists study the broader picture of how societies are structured and organized through a macro-sociological analysis as well as how individuals create their own social reality symbolically through their interactions with others in a micro-sociological analysis. Students in this course will learn the fundamentals of each approach and come away with a sociological framework which they can critically apply to their own lives.
INGS-455
3 Credits
This course will analyze current and historic economic issues faced by Native Americans. It will also examine government policies enacted by and directed toward Native Americans with a focus on their economic implications. This will be done using standard economic models of the labor market, poverty, trade, development, and gaming.
ANTH-265
3 Credits
This course will examine the parallels of anthropological works and resulting government policies in the late-19th and 20th centuries as they relate to the genre of Native Americans film, both popular and ethnographic works. In addition, an extensive regional and historical literature review will complement the possible films.
ECON-101
3 Credits
Microeconomics studies the workings of individual markets. That is, it examines the interaction of the demanders of goods and services with the suppliers of those goods and services. It explores how the behavior of consumers (demanders), the behavior of producers (suppliers), and the level of market competition influence market outcomes.
ECON-452
3 Credits
This course will analyze current and historic economic issues faced by Native Americans. It will also examine government policies enacted by and directed toward Native Americans with a focus on their economic implications. This will be done using standard economic models of the labor market, poverty, trade, development, and gaming.
ANTH-361
3 Credits
Much of the knowledge of our social worlds has been digitized. This course explores how social technologies shape our relationships, personal lives, and sense of self. The metric manufacture of diversity has produced new forms of population management and inequality. Our biographic histories as citizens, consumers, workers/professionals, parents, lovers, and social media users are collected as data-bites and assessed in metric terms, thereby forging new sets of identities. The transformation of people into numerical entities is an act of statistical objectification. This process frames the creation of social and racial typologies, and is well demonstrated by the US census. Students will investigate the formation of racial, ethnic, and gender identities in the context of the accelerated desire to digitize humanity.
ANTH-455
3 Credits
This course will analyze current and historic economic issues faced by Native Americans. It will also examine government policies enacted by and directed toward Native Americans with a focus on their economic implications. This will be done using standard economic models of the labor market, poverty, trade, development, and gaming.
SOCI-361
3 Credits
Much of the knowledge of our social worlds has been digitized. This course explores how social technologies shape our relationships, personal lives, and sense of self. The metric manufacture of diversity has produced new forms of population management and inequality. Our biographic histories as citizens, consumers, workers/professionals, parents, lovers, and social media users are collected as data-bites and assessed in metric terms, thereby forging new sets of identities. The transformation of people into numerical entities is an act of statistical objectification. This process frames the creation of social and racial typologies, and is well demonstrated by the US census. Students will investigate the formation of racial, ethnic, and gender identities in the context of the accelerated desire to digitize humanity.

Select Scholarship

Journal Paper
Burnette, Jeffrey D. and Weiwei Zhang. "Distributional Differences and the Native American Gender Wage Gap." Economies 7. 2 (2019): 46. Web.
Burnette, Jeffrey D. "Inequality in the Labor Market for Native American Women and the Great Recession." American Economic Review 107. 7 (2017): 425-29. Print.
Invited Article/Publication
Burnette, Jeffrey D. "Equal Pay Day and Data Equality for Native American Women." Washington Center for Equitable Growth. (2018). Web.