Joseph Baschnagel Headshot

Joseph Baschnagel

Department Chair

Department of Psychology
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-4187
Office Location

Joseph Baschnagel

Department Chair

Department of Psychology
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BA, MA, Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo

Bio

Dr. Baschnagel’s current research focuses on studying addictive behavior, specifically the attentional and emotional aspects of addiction. This includes studying the effects of nicotine on attentional and emotional processes in both smokers and non-smokers and assessing cue-reactivity to smoking cues and alcohol cues in adults. One particular focus is on incorporation of mobile eye-tracking into cue-reactivity paradigms. Dr. Baschnagel typically uses psychophysiological research methods to study attention and emotional processing; measures such as the startle eye-blink reflex, facial EMG, heartrate, and skin conductance responses and is currently working a method to incorporate these measures with mobile eye-tracking. In addition to using these measures to study addictive behaviors he has applied them to the study of attentional and emotional processing in borderline personality disorder populations, the effects of incentives on basic attentional processes, and emotional processing associated with jealousy. Dr. Baschnagel collaborates with faculty in the Multidisciplinary Vision Research Laboratory and with faculty in the Institute of Health Sciences and Technology here at RIT.

585-475-4187

Personal Links

Select Scholarship

Peer Reviewed/Juried Poster Presentation
Baschnagel, Joseph S. and Jeffrey Miller. "The Relationship Between ADHD Symptomatology and Photophobia." Proceedings of the Society of Psychophysiological Research, Oct 11-14th Vienna Austria. Ed. Monica Fabiani. Madison, WI: Wiley.
Baschnagel, Joseph S. and Ciara Lutz. "The Effect of Impulsive Tendencies on the Experience of Boredom." Proceedings of the Society of Psychophysiological Research, Oct 11-14th Vienna Austria. Ed. Monica Fabiani. Madison, WI: Wiley.
Journal Paper
Baschnagel, J.S. and J. E. Edlund. "Affective modification of the startle eyeblink response during sexual and emotional infidelity scripts." Evolutionary Psychological Science. (2016): 114-122. Print.
Baschnagel, Joseph. "Using Mobile Eye-Tracking to Assess Attention to Smoking Cues in a Naturalized Environment." Addictive Behaviors 38. 12 (2013): 2837-2840. Print.
Baschnagel, J.S. "Psychophysiological Assessment of Emotional Processing in Patients with Borderline Personality Disorders and Without Comorbid Substance Use." Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment. (2012): Advance online publication. Web.
Invited Keynote/Presentation
Baschnagel, Joseph, et al. "Tailoring Automatic Biofeedback to Individual Strengths With a Dynamic Feedback Signal Set." 53rd Conference for The Society for Psychophysiological Research. Society for Psychological Research. Florence, Italy. 2-6 Oct. 2013. Conference Presentation.

Currently Teaching

ITDL-498
0 Credits
Co-op in a field related to Liberal Arts (at least 80 hours). Students will apply the accumulated knowledge, theory, and methods of the discipline to problem solving outside of the classroom.
PSYC-236
3 Credits
This course is intended for students who are interested in learning the history and current status of personality theories. Students will learn the strengths and weaknesses of the major personality theories, as well as how to assess, research and apply these theories. As much as possible, application to real life situations will be discussed.
PSYC-790
0 Credits
Restricted to gpsa graduate program only. Must have permission of department to register for this course.
PSYC-502
3 Credits
This course is intended for students in the psychology major to integrate material covered in earlier courses and examine broad topics in Psychology. The specific topics covered will vary from semester to semester. This course is an opportunity for faculty and students to examine issues that transcend sub-disciplines in psychology. Students will read original research and examine influential theories relevant to the topic.
PSYC-751
0 Credits
The guiding principle of Graduate Research Seminar is that it provides students the opportunity to begin examining potential thesis topics during the student's first semester in the program. The course will involve faculty presentations of their research offered weekly through the semester.
PSYC-753
3 Credits
The Thesis courses will vary widely but will fulfill the work plan agreed by the student and the thesis adviser. The guiding principle of the Thesis course is to complete the thesis research proposed in Thesis Proposal. The Thesis course consists of carrying out the thesis research, including collection and analysis of data, and completion and public defense of the thesis document for partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree.
PSYC-410
3 Credits
This course is intended for students in the biopsychology track. This course provides a comprehensive introduction to psycho-physiology. Students will learn about various psychophysiological measures and their use in the study of areas such as attention, emotion, and language. Topics may include mind-body interaction, somatic and autonomic nervous system function, central and peripheral physiological measures (e.g., EEG, EMG, cardiac reactivity, skin conductance responses), psychophysiological research methods, and applied psychophysiology. Students will be expected to be able to write at an upper level using APA format. Part of the biopsychology track for the psychology degree program.