Lindsay Schenkel Headshot

Lindsay Schenkel

Associate Professor
Department of Psychology
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-2422
Office Location

Lindsay Schenkel

Associate Professor
Department of Psychology
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BA, St. John Fisher College; MA, Ph.D., University of Nebraska at Lincoln

Bio

Dr. Schenkel is a Clinical Psychologist and has been with the Department of Psychology since 2007. Prior to coming to RIT, she held positions at Seton Hall University, the Institute for Juvenile Research in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and the Weill Medical College of Cornell University - New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Schenkel’s research is in the area of developmental psychopathology and the role of social cognition in the clinical expression of serious mental illness, particularly bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Her work has examined emotion processing abnormalities among individuals who suffer from mood disorders as well as those who have histories of childhood trauma. Dr. Schenkel is utilizing eye tracking methodology to better understand this issue (e.g., associations between atypical visual scanning and impairments in emotion recognition). Her work has also focused on relationships between early traumatic experiences and later clinical outcomes among hearing and deaf individuals. To this end, her research attempts to integrate clinical, developmental, and psychophysiological approaches in the study of risk factors for serious mental illness and social-cognitive dysfunction.

For a more extensive list of Dr. Schenkel’s publications and research, please see her personal webpage: http://people.rit.edu/lssgsh/Welcome.html

585-475-2422

Currently Teaching

PSYC-221H
3 Credits
This course will serve as an introduction to the study of psychopathology and mental illness. The course examines the major categories of mental disorder not only from the descriptive point of view, but also in terms of the major theoretical explanations of the causes of disorder. The major treatment modalities are also covered. This honors course will consist of seminar-style discussions of major course topics as well as independent research work to explore topics related to abnormal psychology in greater depth than the standard abnormal psychology course.
PSYC-501
3 Credits
This course is intended for students in the psychology major to develop experimental research expertise and put into practice some of what is learned in Research Methods I and II. Students will explore topics of interest for further research in psychology. They will develop one research idea that could either form the basis for a senior project in psychology or is a valid test of a research idea. Students will be supervised by the course instructor as they develop a research question, conduct a literature review, write the introduction, and examine questions about control, validity and reliability. This course will culminate in a research proposal. Students going on to Senior Project in Psychology can use this as a proposal course and must find their faculty adviser for senior project before they finish this course. Students who are not planning for Senior Project will practice writing a proposal and the related skills required to critically examine an advanced topic in Psychology.
PSYC-420
3 Credits
This course is intended for students in the clinical track. This course is designed to provide a broad overview of the field of clinical psychology, including the way in which it is similar to and different from other mental health disciplines (psychiatry, social work, school psychology). The course will cover the basic foundations of clinical psychology, training models and graduate programs, clinical assessment, clinical interventions, and subspecialties in clinical psychology (e.g., neuropsychology, child clinical).
PSYC-422
3 Credits
This course is intended for students in the clinical track. Students will learn the strengths and weaknesses of the major therapeutic approaches. They will learn the efficacy of these approaches. They will learn the theoretical and research bases for the approaches. As much as possible, application to real life situations will be discussed. Part of the clinical track for the psychology degree program.
PSYC-221
3 Credits
This course will serve as an introduction to the study of psychopathology and mental illness. The course examines the major categories of mental disorder not only from the descriptive point of view, but also in terms of the major theoretical explanations of the causes of disorder. The major treatment modalities also are covered.
PSYC-510
3 Credits
This course is intended for students in the psychology major to demonstrate experimental research expertise, while being guided by faculty advisors. The topic to be studied is up to the student, who must find a faculty advisor before signing up for the course. Students will be supervised by the advisor as they conduct their literature review, develop the research question or hypothesis, develop the study methodology and materials, construct all necessary IRB materials, run subjects, and analyze the results of their study. This course will culminate in an APA style paper and poster presentation reporting the results of the research. Because Senior Project is the culmination of a student’s scientific research learning experience in the psychology major, it is expected that the project will be somewhat novel, will extend the theoretical understanding of their previous work (or of the previous work of another researcher), and go well beyond any similar projects that they might have done in any of their previous courses.
PSYC-752
3 Credits
The Thesis courses will vary widely but will fulfill the work plan agreed by the student and the adviser. The guiding principles of the Thesis Proposal course are to initiate thesis research including selecting a thesis advisor, choosing and defining a topic, surveying relevant research literature, and planning the research. To complete the course, the student will successfully submit and defend a thesis proposal, which is a detailed and complete plan of the thesis research. The thesis proposal should include exhaustive review of relevant literature, statement of the student's thesis, formulation of hypotheses, operational definitions of independent and dependent variables, and a detailed procedure for carrying out the research. The proposal may also include a section on anticipated results with a detailed plan for analysis of data.
PSYC-753
3 Credits
The Thesis courses will vary widely but will fulfill the work plan agreed by the student and the thesis adviser. The guiding principle of the Thesis course is to complete the thesis research proposed in Thesis Proposal. The Thesis course consists of carrying out the thesis research, including collection and analysis of data, and completion and public defense of the thesis document for partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree.
PSYC-241
3 Credits
A majority of serious diseases today are caused by or exacerbated by behavior and many are preventable. This course provides an introduction to the role of behavior in health. Students will learn about the role of psychology in studying and promoting good health behaviors. Topics include the impact of stress and coping on health, psychological variables related to chronic disease, drug addiction, promoting healthy behavior (e.g. exercise, diet, sleep, sexual health), positive psychology, pain management, critical thinking about health product and alternative medicine claims, and research approaches in health psychology. Students who might elect to take this course include students majoring in related fields who wish to learn more about health behavior (e.g. healthcare technology), students majoring, minoring, or immersing in Psychology, and students looking for a Liberal Arts Elective.
PSYC-101H
3 Credits
A state-of-the-art survey of major subfields in psychology and the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Topics include: a critical evaluation of psychological science; neuroscience and behavior; sensation and perception; learning; memory; thinking, language, and intelligence; motivation and emotion; personality; psychological disorders and therapy; and social psychology. The course focuses not only upon understanding the behavior of the individual, but also upon understanding how the individual acts within groups and reacts to group membership. Besides textbook reading, students will read and discuss current publications on the topics we explore, including examination of the scientific method (including validity and reliability) employed in published studies.
PSYC-798
3 Credits
Practicum open to MSc Experimental Psychology students. This course gives the student first-hand experience in the field of Psychology. The experience may involve a specific research project or other relevant professional development projects independent of the student’s thesis research. Students are closely supervised by a faculty member and will develop skills and gain experience in relevant advanced research and professional development in Experimental Psychology.

Select Scholarship

Peer Reviewed/Juried Poster Presentation
Popov, Victoria A. and Schenkel, Lindsay S. "Independent Contributions of Child Maltreatment and Schizotypy on Social Cognition and Interpersonal Functioning." Proceedings of the Society for Research in Psychopathology. Buffalo, NY. September, 2019. Ed. SRP. Buffalo, New York: n.p..
LaRock, Kristina M., et al. "Alexithymia and Maternal Attachment as Mediators in the Relationship between Child Maltreatment and Bipolar Symptomatology in Young Adults." Proceedings of the Society for Research in Psychopathology. Buffalo, NY. September, 2019. Ed. SRP. Buffalo, New York: n.p..
Popov, Victoria A. and Schenkel, Lindsay S. "Sign Language and Deaf Cultural Identity as Protective Factors against Psychological Maladjustment among Deaf College Students." Proceedings of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies Annual Convention, New York, NY. November, 2019. Ed. ABCT. Atlanta, Georgia: n.p..
Gray-Nixon, Tamara, Suzanne M Bamonto, and Lindsay S Schenkel. "Emotion Recognition and Psychosocial Functioning in Youth with Bipolar Disorder." Proceedings of the National Association for School Psychologists. Ed. NASP. Chicago, IL: n.p..
Popov, Victoria and Lindsay S Schenkel. "Interrelationships Between Child Maltreatment, Schizotypy, and Theory of Mind Impairments." Proceedings of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. Ed. ABCT. Washington DC, DC: n.p..
Nowalis, Sarah and Schenkel, Lindsay. "Child Maltreatment and Mood Dysregulation: Exploring the roles of Alexithymia and Maternal Attachment." Proceedings of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies; New York, NY; October 30, 2016. Ed. N/A. New York City, NY: n.p..
Published Conference Proceedings
Schenkel, Lindsay S and Suzanne Bamonto. "School-based Preventative Interventions for Children at-risk for Substance Abuse." Proceedings of the Finger Lakes Task Force on Substance Abuse. Rochester, NY: n.p., 2018. Web.
Invited Keynote/Presentation
Schenkel, Lindsay. "Substance Use Among Youth: Where are we Going?" Men in Transition Meeting. Jewish Community Center. Rochester, NY. 5 Jun. 2018. Keynote Speech.
Schenkel, L.S. "Social-Cognitive Impairments in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder." UR/Mt. Hope Family Center Research Series. University of Rochester. Rochester, NY. 1 Nov. 2014. Guest Lecture.
Priddy, B. M., et al. "Lifetime Trauma Exposure and Victimization Among Deaf and Hard or Hearing Adults." Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies Annual Convention. Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. Nashville, TN. 21-24 Nov. 2013. Conference Presentation.
Journal Paper
Schenkel, L.S., et al. "Child Maltreatment and Trauma Exposure Among Deaf and Hard of Hearing Young Adults." Child Abuse and Neglect 38. (2014): 1581-1589. Print.
Schenkel, L. S., T. Chamberlain, and T. L. Towne. "Impaired Theory of Mind and Psychosocial Functioning in Type I versus Type II Pediatric Patients with Bipolar Disorder." Psychiatry Research 215. (2014): 740-746. Print.
Schenkel, L.S., et al. "Cognitive Dysfunction is Worse Among Pediatric Patients with Bipolar Disorder Type I than Type II." Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 53. (2012): 775-781. Print.
Schenkel, L.S., et al. "Negative Emotion Impairs Working Memory in Pediatric Patients with Bipolar Disorder Type I." Psychological Medicine 8. (2012): 1-11. Print.