Michael Ruhling Headshot

Michael Ruhling

Professor
Department of Performing Arts and Visual Culture
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-2014
Office Location

Michael Ruhling

Professor
Department of Performing Arts and Visual Culture
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BA, Goshen College; MA, University of Notre Dame; MM, University of Missouri; Ph.D., Catholic University of America

Bio

Michael E. Ruhling is Professor of Performing Arts in the College of Liberal Arts at the Rochester (NY) Institute of Technology, and conductor of the RIT Orchestra and Chamber Orchestra. He also teaches courses at the Eastman School of Music, and is the current conductor of the Rochester Medical Orchestra. He holds a Ph.D. in historical musicology from The Catholic University of America, and master's degrees in orchestral conducting (U. of Missouri) and music history (Notre Dame). From 2004 to 2009 Michael served on the conducting and lecture faculty of the Classical Music Festival in Eisenstadt, Austria, and was bass section leader in the Festival Chorus. He has appeared as guest conductor of the Brighton Symphony Orchestra, Prince George’s Philharmonic, Finger Lakes Symphony, UNLV Symphony and Opera, Rochester’s Air de Cour, and several other orchestras and choirs throughout the United States. He is the author of Johann Peter Salomon’s Scores of Four Haydn Symphonies: Edition with Commentary, published by the Edwin Mellen Press, and his essay on the symphonies of Michael Haydn is included in The Symphonic Repertoire, Vol. 1: The Eighteenth Century Symphony published by the Indiana University Press. Dr. Ruhling was named the 2008-2009 Christopher Hogwood Historically Informed Performance Fellow by the Boston Handel and Haydn Society, the oldest performing ensemble in the U.S. He is the first president of the Haydn Society of North America and editor of their online journal HAYDN, a member of the Haydn Society of Great Britain’s Committee of Honour, and recently served as secretary-treasurer of the Society for Eighteenth Century Music.

585-475-2014

Currently Teaching

FNRT-110
3 Credits
An introduction to music as a fine art. Students develop skills in listening, evaluation and analysis through an examination of music's forms, constituent elements, and its cultural, stylistic and historical development.
FNRT-211
3 Credits
Many of the characteristics of art music up to the present day have their beginnings in the late 18th century. This course explores the creation and performance of music within the context of European cultural, political and artistic ideals from 1740 to 1825, with particular attention given to the works of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven.
FNRT-210
3 Credits
European society experienced many changes during the late 16th through the early 18th centuries, and music's role and development within the context of these changes was varied, and profound. This course explores the creation and performance of music within the context of European cultural, religious, political and artistic ideals from 1580 to 1750, culminating in in-depth discussion of the life and works of J. S. Bach and G. F. Handel.
FNRT-209
3 Credits
The beginning of the Western tradition of art music can be traced to Medieval Europe ca. 600 CE, as systems of music notation began to develop in and disseminate through important liturgical text sources. This desire to preserve and disseminate certain musical-textual traditions grew and developed steadily throughout Christendom over the next millennium, in both sacred and secular contexts. This course examines this development of music and text during the Medieval and Renaissance periods (ca. 600-1600 CE), with attention drawn to specific aspects of cultural context and performance practices that offer modern musicians and music connoisseurs a solid basis for experiencing the music in live performance, both in active listening (concert/liturgy attendence) and in participating (in-class singing).
FNRT-204
3 Credits
A historical and cultural survey of collaboration between the arts of music and theatre, focusing on a selection of significant creative products that combine music and drama. Possible works studied include those by Shakespeare, Monteverdi, Mozart-Daponte, John Gay, Beethoven-Goethe, Wagner, Puccini, Brecht-Weill, and Bernstein, spanning the genres of Renaissance tragedy and comedy, opera seria, opera buffa, ballad opera, incidental music, romantic drama, Italian opera, music-drama, epic theatre, cabaret, vaudeville, and musical comedy.

Select Scholarship

Published Review
Ruhling, Michael E. "Book Review: Raymond Knapp, Making Light: Haydn, Musical Camp, and the Long Shadow of German Idealism." Rev. of Making Light: Haydn, Musical Camp, and the Long Shadow of German Idealism., by Raymond Knapp. HAYDN: Online Journal of the Haydn Society of North America 1 May 2018: Reviews. Web.
Journal Editor
Ruhling, Michael E., ed. HAYDN: Online Journal of the Haydn Society of North America. Rochester, NY: RIT Press, 2016. Web.
Ruhling, Michael E., ed. HAYDN: Online Journal of the Haydn Society of North America. Rochester, NY: RIT Press, 2018. Web. *
Invited Article/Publication
Ruhling, Michael E. "Generating STEAM: Haydn and the Arts in General Education at a “Career-Oriented” Institute of Technology." HAYDN: Online Journal of the Haydn Society of North America, Issue 6.1 (Spring 2016). (2016). Web. *
Ruhling, Michael E. "Generating STEAM: Haydn and the Arts in General Education at a “Career-Oriented” Institute of Technology." HAYDN: Online Journal of the Haydn Society of North America, Issue 6.1 (Spring 2016). (2016). Web. *
Book Chapter
Ruhling, Michael E. "Johann Michael Haydn." The Symphonic Repertoire, Vol. 1: The Early 18th Century Symphony. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 2012. 498-515. Print. ∆ ≠