Qing Miao Headshot

Qing Miao

Assistant Professor
Department of Public Policy
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-7136
Office Location

Qing Miao

Assistant Professor
Department of Public Policy
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BA, Nanjing University (China); MS, University of Michigan; Ph.D., Syracuse University

Bio

Qing Miao is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at RIT. Her research areas include environmental economics and policy with a particular focus on climate risks and adaptation, science and technology policy, and public finance. Her current work seeks to understand the motivation and implication of technological change in the area of climate adaptation, how societies and public organizations manage the risks of extreme weather and climatic interruptions, and the fiscal impacts of natural hazards on sub-national governments. Her research informs policy on climate adaptation, disaster aid, and emergency management.

 

Qing holds a Ph.D. in Public Administration from the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs of Syracuse University. Prior to joining RIT, she was a post-doctoral fellow in the Center for Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy Studies at Arizona State University. Qing received a Master of Public Policy from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and a Bachelor’s degree in Journalism from Nanjing University in China.

 

Current Research:

Dr. Miao’s current research is focused on understanding how extreme weather, natural disasters, and climate change inform public policy. As part of this work, she is examining the effects of natural disasters on government finances, including public expenditures, tax revenues, and debt in both developed and developing contexts. Through this research, Dr. Miao is answering critical questions related to how we should evaluate the fiscal costs of natural disasters and how various levels of government should share the cost burden of these disasters. She is also identifying the impact of government disaster aid on individual behaviors and community resilience.

 

In another research project, Dr. Miao is exploring what factors influence how transit agencies develop their responses to extreme weather events and deal with these events when they occur. By doing so, she is providing new insight into the role that infrastructure and technology adaptation play in the ability of transit agencies to respond to extreme weather effectively.

 

Additionally, Dr. Miao is researching technological change as a response to climate change mitigation and adaptation. Her work involves identifying novel ways in which technological innovation and public policy interventions can serve to limit the adverse social impacts of climate change.

585-475-7136

Areas of Expertise
Environmental Policy
Science and Technology Policy
Public Finance

Currently Teaching

PUBL-701
3 Credits
This course provides graduate students with necessary tools to help them become effective policy analysts. The course places particular emphasis on understanding the policy process, the different approaches to policy analysis, and the application of quantitative and qualitative methods for evaluating public policies. Students will apply these tools to contemporary public policy decision making at the local, state, federal, and international levels.
PUBL-101
3 Credits
This interdisciplinary course introduces the student to the key concepts of public policy, the policymaking process, the role of stakeholders and interest groups, and the basic dimensions policy analysis. Those concepts are then applied through a range of issues, such as the environment, clean energy, climate change, healthcare, cybersecurity, employment, privacy, telecommunications, and innovation, at local, state, federal and international levels.
PUBL-301
3 Credits
This course provides students with necessary tools to help them become effective policy analysts. The course places particular emphasis on understanding the policy process, the different approaches to policy analysis, and the application of quantitative methods, such as cost-benefit analysis, sampling designs, and decision trees. Students will apply these tools to contemporary public policy decision making at the local, state, federal, and international levels.

Select Scholarship

Journal Paper
Miao, Qing, Yilin Hou, and Michael Abrigo. "Measuring the Financial Shocks of Natural Disasters: A Panel Study of U.S. States." National Tax Journal 71. 1 (2018): 11-44. Print. *
Zhang, Fengxiu, Eric Welch, and Qing Miao. "Public Organization Adaptation to Extreme Events: Mediating Role of Risk Perception." Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory 28. 3 (2018): 371-387. Print. *
Wang, Yiwei and Qing Miao. "Implication of Replacing the Federal and State Fuel Taxes with a National Vehicle Miles Traveled Tax." Transportation Research Records: Journal of the Transportation Research Board. (2018): 1-11. Print. *
Miao, Qing, et al. "Public Transit Extreme Weather Risk Perceptions Climate Adaptation Climate Change." Transportation Research Part D 63. (2018): 421-432. Web. *
Miao, Qing, et al. "What Drives Public Transit Organizations in the United States to Adapt to Extreme Weather Events?" Journal of Environmental Management 225. (2018): 252-260. Web. *
Miao, Qing. "Are We Adapting to Floods? Evidence from Global Flooding Fatalities." Risk Analysis. (2018): 1-16. Web. *
Miao, Qing. "Technological Innovation, Social Learning and Natural Hazard Mitigation: Evidence on Earthquake Fatalities." Environment and Development Economics 22. 3 (2017): 249-273. Print. «
Miao, Qing and David Popp. "Necessity of the Mother of Invention: Innovative Response to Natural Disasters." Journal of Environmental Economics and Management 68. (2014): 280-295. Print. *
Invited Article/Publication
Miao, Qing. "The Fiscal Implications of Managing Natural Disasters for National and Subnational Governments." Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Natural Hazard Science. (2018). Web. *