Sarah Burns Headshot

Sarah Burns

Associate Professor

Department of Political Science
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-2064
Office Location

Sarah Burns

Associate Professor

Department of Political Science
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BA, University of Toronto (Canada); MA, Ph.D., Claremont Graduate University

585-475-2064

Personal Links

Select Scholarship

Journal Paper
Burns, Sarah. "Legalizing a Political Fight: Congressional Abdication of War Powers in the Bush and Obama Administrations." Presidential Studies Quarterly 51. 3 (2021): 462-491. Print.
Burns, Sarah and Andrew Stravers. "Obama, Congress, and Audience Costs: Shifting the Blame on the Red Line." Political Science Quarterly 135. 1 (2020): 67-101. Print.
Burns, Sarah. "Capitalist Peace Theory: A New Way Forward for American Foreign Policy." Society. (2017): 501-508. Print.
Burns, Sarah. "Debating War Powers: Battles in the Clinton and Obama Administrations." Political Science Quarterly 132. 2 (2017): 203-223. Print.
Burns, Sarah, Lindsay Eberhardt, and Jennifer Merolla. "What's the Difference between a Hockey Mom and a Pit Bull? Presentations of Palin and Gender Stereotypes in the 2008 Presidential Election." Political Research Quarterly 66. 3 (2013): 687-701. Print.
Full Length Book
Burns, Sarah. The Politics of War Powers: The Theory and History of Presidential Unilateralism. Lawrence, Kansas: University of Kansas Press, 2019. Print.
Invited Keynote/Presentation
Burns, Sarah. "America's Ambivalent Relationship with Liberal Imperialism." Toronto Liberty Seminar. Institute for Liberal Studies. Toronto, Canada. 8 Mar. 2014. Lecture.

Currently Teaching

POLS-305
3 Credits
Political parties are a crucial part of the democratic process, as are elections. Parties and elections serve as a critical link between citizens and their government, as parties and candidates promote policies favored by voters. This course studies parties, their history, their future and their role in the democratic process. Overall emphasis is on the degree to which parties perform or fail to perform as a link between citizens and government.
POLS-315
3 Credits
A study of the role of the presidency in the American political system. Among the topics considered are the nomination and election processes, the evolution, expansion and limitation of presidential power, factors in decision-making and the various leadership functions performed by the president.
POLS-330
3 Credits
This course explores the theoretical meaning, both domestically and internationally, and the institutional and political aspects of human rights. Issues covered include the definition of human rights; the relationship between civil and political rights and economic, social and cultural rights; the meaning and impact of humanitarian and international human rights law; the impact of cultural relativism in the definition and assessment of the promotion and protection of human rights; the significance of different religious perspectives; the question of the legitimacy of humanitarian interventions and the effects of globalization on human rights perceptions and practices.
POLS-440
3 Credits
Explores the enduring reality of war through an analysis of regional and global conflicts since the establishment of the modern international system. Key concepts include deterrence, appeasement, offensive-defensive military strategies, and international balances of power. These will be applied to several historical cases to explain why wars occur and how they might be avoided.
POLS-490
3 Credits
This course explores the enduring issues facing the American and global political order through the lens of film. Particular attention will be paid to the principles of sound political deliberation, the limitations of political leadership and the theory and practice of American political principles both at home and abroad.

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