Tina Sutton Headshot

Tina Sutton

Associate Professor
Department of Psychology
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-6773
Office Location
Office Mailing Address
Eastman Building Room 2305

Tina Sutton

Associate Professor
Department of Psychology
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BS, Union College; MA, Ph.D., State University of New York at Albany

Bio

Professor Sutton joined the Department of Psychology in the Fall of 2012. She teaches a variety of courses including Introduction to Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, and Research Methods. Her research focuses on the psychology of language, cognition and emotion, emotion word representation within and across languages, and hemispheric specialization.

585-475-6773

Currently Teaching

PSYC-223
3 Credits
This course examines how people perceive, learn, represent, remember and use information. Contemporary theory and research are surveyed in such areas as attention, pattern and object recognition, memory, knowledge representation, language acquisition and use, reasoning, decision making, problem solving, creativity, and intelligence. Applications in artificial intelligence and human/technology interaction may also be considered.
PSYC-431
3 Credits
This course is intended for students in the cognitive track. This course examines the structure of human language and its relationship to thought, and surveys contemporary theory and research on the comprehension and production of spoken and written language. In addition, we will discuss categorization, representation of knowledge, expertise, consciousness, intelligence, and artificial intelligence. Topics on language and thought in non-human animals may also be covered. Part of the cognitive track for the psychology degree program.
PSYC-753
3 Credits
The Thesis courses will vary widely but will fulfill the work plan agreed by the student and the thesis adviser. The guiding principle of the Thesis course is to complete the thesis research proposed in Thesis Proposal. The Thesis course consists of carrying out the thesis research, including collection and analysis of data, and completion and public defense of the thesis document for partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree.
PSYC-251
3 Credits
This course will serve as an advanced research methods course in psychology, and will build on the foundational knowledge presented in Research Methods I. Topics and tasks for this course include designing single and multi-factor experiments, interpreting correlational research, completing statistical analyses appropriate to design, completing and analyzing an IRB application, understanding observational and survey research, and presenting results in APA style. This is a required course for all psychology majors, and is restricted to students in the psychology program.
PSYC-752
3 Credits
The Thesis courses will vary widely but will fulfill the work plan agreed by the student and the adviser. The guiding principles of the Thesis Proposal course are to initiate thesis research including selecting a thesis advisor, choosing and defining a topic, surveying relevant research literature, and planning the research. To complete the course, the student will successfully submit and defend a thesis proposal, which is a detailed and complete plan of the thesis research. The thesis proposal should include exhaustive review of relevant literature, statement of the student's thesis, formulation of hypotheses, operational definitions of independent and dependent variables, and a detailed procedure for carrying out the research. The proposal may also include a section on anticipated results with a detailed plan for analysis of data.
PSYC-510
3 Credits
This course is intended for students in the psychology major to demonstrate experimental research expertise, while being guided by faculty advisors. The topic to be studied is up to the student, who must find a faculty advisor before signing up for the course. Students will be supervised by the advisor as they conduct their literature review, develop the research question or hypothesis, develop the study methodology and materials, construct all necessary IRB materials, run subjects, and analyze the results of their study. This course will culminate in an APA style paper and poster presentation reporting the results of the research. Because Senior Project is the culmination of a student’s scientific research learning experience in the psychology major, it is expected that the project will be somewhat novel, will extend the theoretical understanding of their previous work (or of the previous work of another researcher), and go well beyond any similar projects that they might have done in any of their previous courses.

Select Scholarship

Journal Paper
Sutton, Tina M. and Ciara Lutz. "Attentional Capture for Emotional Words and Images: The Importance of Valence and Arousal." Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology. (2018): 1-8. Print.
Bruce, Sheila, Tina Sutton, and Poorna Kushalnagar. "Levels of Emotion Valence and Arousal in American Sign Language." Journal of American Deafness and Rehabilitation Association. (2017): 21-33. Print.
Sutton, Tina M and Jeanette Altarriba. "Color associations to emotion and emotion-laden words: A collection of norms for stimulus construction and selection." Behavior Research Methods 48. (2016): 686-728. Print.
Sutton, Tina M. and Jeanette Altarriba. "Finding the positive in all of the negative: Facilitation for color-related emotion words in a negative priming paradigm." Acta Psychologica 170. (2016): 84-93. Print.
Peer Reviewed/Juried Poster Presentation
Condry, Kirsten, et al. "Improving Learning in Psychology Research Methods by Enriching Statistics Instruction and Promoting Positive Mindset." Proceedings of the Association for Psychological Science Convention. Ed. N/A. San Fransisco, CA: n.p..
Sutton, Tina, Andrew Herbert, and Dailyn Clark. "Valence, Arousal, and Dominance Ratings for Face Stimuli." Proceedings of the 58th Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society. Ed. Aaron Benjamin. Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada: n.p..