Gary Skuse Headshot

Gary Skuse

Professor
Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences
College of Science

585-475-6725
Office Location

Gary Skuse

Professor
Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences
College of Science

Education

BA, University of Rochester; Ph.D., Syracuse University

Bio

Dr. Skuse teaches courses at the undergraduate and graduate level in Bioinformatics and for students in all programs within the Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences. He is also the founding member and chair of the RIT Institutional Biosafety Committee.

 

Dr. Skuse spent more than a decade on the faculty of the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. While at the University of Rochester Dr. Skuse studied the genetics of a common disease which predisposes affected individuals to tumors of the central and peripheral nervous system. He has co-authored several US and European patents, written and edited professional books, published numerous scientific articles and has served as the Chief Information Officer and founding partner of a scientific information and services provider. He also provides consulting services to a number of local, national and international clients in the areas of human genetics, biotechnology, forensic DNA analysis, information management and communications.

585-475-6725

Currently Teaching

BIOL-495
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed student project or research involving laboratory or field work, computer modeling, or theoretical calculations that could be considered of an original nature. The level of study is appropriate for students in their final two years of study.
BIOL-798
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed, graduate level tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum.
BIOL-498
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for student in their final two years of study.
BIOL-301
1 - 4 Credits
This course allows students to assist in a class or laboratory for which they have previously earned credit. The student will assist the instructor in the operation of the course. Assistance by the student may include fielding questions, helping in workshops, and assisting in review sessions. In the case of labs, students may also be asked to help with supervising safety practices, waste manifestation, and instrumentation.
BIOL-298
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for student in their first three years of study.
BIOL-791
0 Credits
Continuation of Thesis
BIOL-296
3 Credits
This course explores major ethical issues in medicine and biology via lecture, readings, films, and presentation and discussion of cases. Students report on current events in ethics as researched on the internet or other news media. The first portion of the course is in a lecture format. Students learn about various theories of ethical analysis that are in current use. Subsequent classes are devoted to particular ethical areas. Relevant cases are given to the students for presentation in both written and oral formats. Any additional background material that may be required to discuss the cases is presented by the instructor and the remainder of the period is discussion based on the philosophical foundation provided at the beginning of the course.
BIOL-389
1 - 3 Credits
This is an advanced course on a topic that is not part of the formal curriculum. This course is structured as an ordinary course and has specific prerequisites, contact hours, and examination procedures. The level of study is appropriate for students in their final two years of study.
BIOL-304
3 Credits
This is an Honors course. This course will look at the use of biological evidence in the criminal justice system from the perspectives of a scientist and an experienced criminal defense attorney. Together they will describe the judicial process and their experiences with the system while addressing the strengths and weaknesses intrinsic to both the science and the law. Wherever possible they will employ case-based examples and delve into the ethical considerations intrinsic to the judicial process and to the application of scientific methods and technologies in court. Students will have opportunities to further explore course topics by exploring real cases and sharing their findings in class. A mock trial will be carried out in which students prepare defense and prosecution strategies and serve as attorneys and expert witnesses. Attorneys from the community will serve as judge and jurors.
BIOL-425
3 Credits
This course focuses on individual and organizational responsibilities in bioinformatics research, product development, product commercialization and clinical and consumer genetic testing.
BIOL-295
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed student project or research involving laboratory work, computer modeling, or theoretical calculations that could be considered of an original nature. The level of study is appropriate for students in their first three years of study.
BIOL-265
4 Credits
This course investigates the historical framework of evolutionary biology and the meaning/nature of evidence pertinent to biological evolution. Topics will include: earth history, the evolution of proteins and the genetic code, molecular evolution, neutral theory vs. selection, genetic variation, natural selection, migration, mutation, genetic drift, fitness, population dynamics and genetics, speciation, systematics and classification systems, molecular phylogenetics, the evolution of eukaryotic organisms, behavioral evolution, historical biogeography, and human evolution and variation.
BIOL-625
3 Credits
This course will be focused on individual and organizational responsibilities in bioinformatics research, product development, product commercialization and clinical and consumer genetic testing.
PROF-798
3 Credits
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of faculty.

Select Scholarship

Book Chapter
Skuse, Gary R., et al. "Computer Science and the Liberal Arts: Hidden Synergies and Boundless Opportunities." New Directions for Computing Education: Embedding Computing Across Disciplines. Ed. Samuel B. Fee, Amanda M. Holland-Minkley, and Thomas E. Lombardy. Cham, Switzerland: Springer Nature, 2017. 45-62. Print.
Skuse, Gary R. and Kathleen Lamkin-Kennard. "Reverse Engineering Life: Physical and Chemical Mimetics for Controlled Stem Cell Differentiation into Cardiomyocytes." Methods in Molecular Biology. Ed. John W. Ludlow and Joydeep Basu. New York, New York: Humana Press, 2013. 99-114. Print.
Journal Editor
Skuse, Gary R., ed. Journal of Emerging Diseases and Virology. Milpitas: Sci Forschen Inc., 2017. Web.
Invited Paper
Ferran, Maureen C. and Gary R. Skuse. "Evasion of Host Innate Immunity by Emerging Viruses: Antagonizind Host RIG-I Pathways." Journal of Emerging Diseases and Virology. (2017). Web.
Full Length Book
(eds), Skuse, G.R. and Ferran, M.C. Methods in Molecular Biology: Cardiomyocyte Science. volume 1299 ed. New York, NY: Humana Press, 2015. Print.
Journal Paper
Skuse, Gary R. and Anne M. Burger. "Justice as Fairness: Forensic Implications of DNA and Privacy." The Champion. (2015): 24-35. Print.
Lopatto, D., et al. "A Central Support System Can Facilitate Implementation and Sustainability of a Classroom-Based Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE) in Genomics." CBE Life Science Education 13. 4 (2014): 711-723. Print.