Joel Kastner Headshot

Joel Kastner

Professor

Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science
College of Science

585-475-7179
Office Location

Joel Kastner

Professor

Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science
College of Science

Education

BS, University of Maryland; MS, Ph.D., University of California

Bio

585-475-7179

Personal Links
Areas of Expertise

Currently Teaching

ASTP-608
3 Credits
This course will provide a basic introduction to modern astrophysics, including the topics of radiation fields and matter, star formation and evolution, and stellar structure. This course will provide the physical background needed to interpret both observations and theoretical models in stellar astrophysics and prepare students for more advanced topics and research in astrophysics.
ASTP-730
3 Credits
An overview of the physical principles and observational phenomenology describing stellar atmospheres and stellar evolution. Topics covered include: atmospheric temperature structure and line formation; atmosphere models and spectral type determination; observational (spectral) diagnostics of stellar masses, abundances, ages and evolutionary states; and a survey of contemporary topics in star formation and pre- and post-main sequence stellar evolution, with emphasis on the physical processes governing stellar accretion, mass loss, and the effects of binary companions on these processes.
ASTP-790
1 - 3 Credits
Masters-level research by the candidate on an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the research advisor.
ASTP-791
0 Credits
Continuation of Thesis
ASTP-890
1 - 6 Credits
Dissertation research by the candidate for an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the research advisor.
ASTP-891
0 Credits
Continuation of Thesis
IMGS-112
3 Credits
This course provides an understanding and appreciation of the fundamental science goals driving the development of contemporary astronomical imaging systems and the basic principles and concepts underlying those systems. Students will investigate the world's most powerful telescopes and cameras presently operating in the realm of human vision, as well as systems that image the “invisible”, by tapping the infrared, X-ray, and radio regimes of the electromagnetic spectrum. Laboratory exercises familiarize students with basic visualization, manipulation, and measurement of real astronomical images (drawn from major-facility archives) that span these regimes. Students will also get a glimpse of the future of astronomical imaging. This course satisfies a General Education elective requirement in the areas of natural science inquiry, scientific principles, or science/math literacy. Math proficiency at college algebra level is required.
IMGS-890
1 - 6 Credits
Doctoral-level research by the candidate on an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the research advisor.
IMGS-891
0 Credits
Continuation of Thesis

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