Lucia Carichino Headshot

Lucia Carichino

Assistant Professor
School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science

585-475-2537
Office Hours
Monday 2:00-2:50 pm, Wednesday 1:00-2:50 pm, Friday 10:00-10:50am, or by appointment via e-mail
Office Location
Office Mailing Address
School of Mathematical Sciences, 85 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623

Lucia Carichino

Assistant Professor
School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science

Education

PhD, Mathematics, Purdue University; BS, MS, Mathematical Engineering, (Italy)

Bio

The focus of my research is on mathematical and computational models of multiscale biological systems including fluid-structure interaction. I am excited by the potential of using mathematical models that describe the physical phenomena governing biological systems in synergy with experimental data to elucidate the mechanisms behind a biological process, ultimately aiding the future development of medicine. I enjoy teaching, I strive to establish a classroom environment where the students are challenged to ask questions and share ideas without the concern of making mistakes.

585-475-2537

Areas of Expertise

Currently Teaching

MATH-182
4 Credits
This is the second in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates.
MATH-241
3 Credits
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of linear algebra, and techniques of matrix manipulation. Topics include linear transformations, Gaussian elimination, matrix arithmetic, determinants, vector spaces, linear independence, basis, null space, row space, and column space of a matrix, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, change of basis, similarity and diagonalization. Various applications are studied throughout the course.
MATH-495
1 - 3 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed project that could be considered original in nature. The level of work is appropriate for students in their final two years of undergraduate study.