School of Physics and Astronomy – News

  • December 12, 2019

    large and small satellite dishes.

    RIT and IAR observe pulsars for the first time from South America

    A team from RIT and the Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomía (IAR) upgraded two radio telescopes in Argentina that lay dormant for 15 years in order to study pulsars, rapidly rotating neutron stars with intense magnetic fields that emit notably in radio wavelengths. The project is outlined in a new paper published in Astronomy and Astrophysics.

  • November 18, 2019

    Two researchers wearing cleansuits work on detector equipment.

    Researchers prepare rocket for launch

    A team of RIT researchers is helping launch an experiment above the atmosphere to better understand extragalactic background light, which traces the history of galaxies back to the formation of the first stars in the universe.

  • November 8, 2019

    Simulation of an accretion disk surrounding a supermassive black hole.

    New study suggests ‘Pac-Man-like’ mergers could explain massive, spinning black holes

    Scientists have reported detecting gravitational waves from 10 black hole mergers to date, but they are still trying to explain the origins of those mergers. The largest merger detected so far seems to have defied previous models because it has a higher spin and mass than the range thought possible. A group of researchers, including RIT Assistant Professor Richard O’Shaughnessy, has created simulations that could explain how the merger happened.

  • October 25, 2019

    An artists rendering of a blackhole, with red and orange waves.

    Shedding light on black holes  

    The Christian Science Monitor talks to Manuela Campanelli, professor and director of the Center for Computational Relativity and Gravitation.

  • October 21, 2019

    Moumita Das in lobby of College of Science.

    RIT researcher receives NSF grant to help build a synthetic neuron and neural network

    Researchers from RIT and six other universities are teaming up to build synthetic neurons and a programmable network of such neurons in an effort to better understand the rules of life. The project is part of the National Science Foundation’s “Big Ideas” initiative— 10 bold, long-term research and process ideas that identify areas for future investment at the frontiers of science and engineering.

  • October 18, 2019

    figure demonstrating pulse arrival times

    Detection of the most massive neutron star known

    Assistant Professor Michael Lam from RIT and the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) detected the most massive neutron star known after 5-years of observations.

  • September 13, 2019

    Gloved hands work on semiconductor wafer.

    RIT Sponsored Research garners $74 million in funding

    RIT had its second best year ever in sponsored research funding and a record year for research expenditures in fiscal year 2019. RIT received 366 new awards totaling $74 million in funding, and expenditures grew to $61 million.