News
Department of Computing and Information Sciences Ph.D.

  • December 6, 2021

    the Vela pulsar, a rapidly rotating neutron star.

    RIT scientists develop machine learning techniques to shed new light on pulsars

    New machine learning techniques developed by scientists at Rochester Institute of Technology are revealing important information about how pulsars—rapidly rotating neutron stars—behave. In a new study published by Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, the researchers outlined their new techniques and how they applied to study Vela, the brightest radio pulsar in the sky.

  • December 1, 2021

    exterior of Golisano Computing building at dusk.

    From floppy disks to the cloud

    In 2001, the dot-com bubble was bursting and investors had lost confidence in internet companies. Twenty years later, data has become a new currency, and people can access just about anything from their smartphones. Throughout all these changes, Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences has evolved into the largest college at RIT, with more than 4,600 students this year. Since its creation 20 years ago, GCCIS has awarded more than 14,000 degrees—in a growing number of computing disciplines.

  • May 11, 2021

    environmental portrait of student Joanna C. S. Santos.

    Ph.D. students take different career paths

    More than 50 students are expected to earn their Ph.D. degrees by the end of June. The hooding ceremony, which will also include Ph.D. recipients in the class of 2020, is May 15.

  • April 2, 2021

    Three people sitting in front of laptops having a discussion.

    RIT researchers are making software secure by design

    With more than $4 million in support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and other organizations, Associate Professor Mehdi Mirakhorli and his student team are developing tools and techniques to help coders take an architectural approach to software design.

  • October 21, 2020

    illustration of six cubes all touching at least two sides to another cube.

    Ph.D. student uses computing to help solve 90-year-old math problem

    David Narváez, a computing and information sciences Ph.D. student, used his expertise in symmetry-breaking to help a cluster of computers solve a 90-year-old math problem called Keller’s conjecture in just 30 minutes. He also brought in techniques that make the proof verifiable, meaning that mathematical computer programs can confirm the answer is correct.

  • October 14, 2020

    reseacher posing in lab.

    RIT, URMC receive grant to study benefits of AI-enabled toilet seat technology

    Toilet seats with high-tech sensors might be the non-invasive technology of the future that could help reduce hospital return rates of individuals with heart disease. A joint project by researchers at RIT and the University of Rochester Medical Center will determine if in-home monitoring can successfully record vital signs and reduce risk and costly re-hospitalization rates for people with heart failure. The five-year, $2.9 million venture is funded by the National Institutes of Health.