Robert Osgood Headshot

Robert Osgood

Associate Professor
Biomedical Sciences Program
Institute of Health Sciences and Technology
Program Director

585-475-7902
Office Location

Robert Osgood

Associate Professor
Biomedical Sciences Program
Institute of Health Sciences and Technology
Program Director

Education

BS, Jackson State University; MS, Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi

Bio

Dr. Osgood enjoyed a 23 year career as a medical technologist before joining RIT. Following a 3.5 year postdoctoral fellowship in oral microbiology at UAB, he came to RIT. Noted for his student teaching, motivation and mentoring, his research has been published in several scientific journals.

585-475-7902

Areas of Expertise
Research Areas: Development of rapid and precise quantitative methodologies to accurately count cariogenic organisms of the oral cavity, probiotics & bacterial causes of middle ear infections in children

Currently Teaching

MEDS-313
3 Credits
This is an advanced course in the mechanisms by which bacteria and fungi cause disease in humans. The course topics include the clinical signs of each disease, diagnosis of each disease, pathogenic mechanisms used by the organisms to cause disease, treatment of the disease, and prevention of the disease. The laboratory component of this course will consist of a mixture of methodologies used in the identification of the infectious agents, evaluation of the host response to the infection, case studies, student presentations of articles related to infectious disease and other assignments aimed at deepening the understanding the infectious disease process.
MEDS-418
1 Credits
Clinical microbiology is a detailed study of the bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites relevant to human infectious diseases, including their historical significance and impact on society. This course provides a hands-on experience in identifying these types of agents. The course will also focus on giving the student an appreciation and clear understanding of emerging/re-emerging infectious disease agents particularly those infectious disease agents commonly encountered in a hospital setting.
MEDS-417
3 Credits
Clinical microbiology is a detailed study of the bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites relevant to human infectious diseases, including their historical significance and impact on society. This course will also focus on giving the student an appreciation and clear understanding of emerging/re-emerging infectious disease agents particularly those infectious disease agents commonly encountered in a hospital setting.
MEDG-106
3 Credits
An introductory course in microbiology including its history, significant contributions to medicine and history, as well as a survey of microbiological organisms as they relate to disease, industry and biotechnology. (any course in Biology)
MEDS-101
3 Credits
This course is designed for students who are interested in learning about the many career opportunities that exist in the field of biomedical sciences. This course will engage the students through a combination of self-reflection by the student and continual discussion of presented material that aims to provide clear insight into the many disciplines that are foundational to the biomedical sciences.
MEDS-510
1 - 4 Credits
This course provides an opportunity for in-depth experiential learning through collaborative work on an independent research project.
BIOL-495
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed student project or research involving laboratory or field work, computer modeling, or theoretical calculations that could be considered of an original nature. The level of study is appropriate for students in their final two years of study.
BIOL-498
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for student in their final two years of study.

Latest News

  • May 9, 2019

    Faculty member and student pose together.

    Mastering microbes: Student combines engineering, bioscience to decrease infections from medical devices

    Samuel Lum found several things in common with his faculty mentor, Robert Osgood, including excitement about research and a project that could save lives. Lum’s background in mechanical engineering technology and Osgood’s microbiology expertise in in studying biofilms would be the kind of multidisciplinary approach that could lead to identifying the genes most likely responsible for hospital-associated catheter infections.

Select Scholarship

Journal Paper
Osgood, Robert, et al. "Effect of pH and Oxygen on Biofilm Formation in Acute Otitis Media Associated NTHi Clinical Isolates." The Laryngoscope. (2014): 14-21. Web.