Joseph Fornieri Headshot

Joseph Fornieri

Professor
Department of Political Science
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-5889
Office Location

Joseph Fornieri

Professor
Department of Political Science
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BA, State University College at Geneseo; MA, Boston College; Ph.D., Catholic University of America

585-475-5889

Areas of Expertise
Abraham Lincoln

Currently Teaching

POLS-460
3 Credits
This course will examine the classical quest for personal and political order. It will concentrate on the foundations of classical political science and its search for the best regime. The course will also examine the classical understanding of constitutionalism, or the regime as the form for encouraging virtue through the rule of law, in contrast to the modern view that attempts to combine liberty and property. Along the way, the enduring questions of cosmology, human nature, justice and the good will be examined.
POLS-110
3 Credits
This course examines the basic principles, themes and institutions of American politics. The course will approach the study of American politics from four interrelated topics: 1) American political values and constitutional foundations; 2) mass politics and political socialization; 3) political institutions; and 4) public policy. Current events will be discussed throughout the course in an effort to promote responsible citizenship. In addition to providing a basic overview of American politics, this course seeks to develop critical thinking, group dynamic and communication skills that are transferrable outside the classroom.
POLS-300
3 Credits
Often political deliberation requires reasoning about indeterminate subjects of public import, which do not permit us to arrive at incontestable conclusions. Even where there is compelling evidence the conclusions of political deliberation usually require rhetorical assistance. Rhetoric reflects an appreciation that the simple truth and scientific facts do not suffice in all circumstances, that citizens sometimes have to be persuaded and led through persuasive speeches to reach reasonable decisions in public life. This course examines the role of rhetoric in political deliberation through a consideration of some of the most politically important speeches in American and international politics. The course will also consider the political use of rhetorical devices as well as the differences between deliberative, epideictic and forensic rhetoric. As a writing intensive course, students will practice the writing conventions associated with the discipline and their skills in editing, revising, and reviewing their writing and the writing of their peers.
POLS-430
3 Credits
This course provides an introduction to the Supreme Court's legal and political reasoning on the civil rights and liberties contained in the Bill of Rights. Particular emphasis will be placed on the First Amendment as the cornerstone of a free society guaranteeing religious liberty and the right to free speech. The course will also examine how the Court has balanced constitutional rights and liberties in the First, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Amendments against the need for enhanced national security.

Select Scholarship

Full Length Book
Fornieri, Joseph R. Abraham Lincoln, Philosopher Statesman. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press, 2014. Print.
Book Chapter
Fornieri, Joseph. "Lincoln on Black Citizenship." Constitutionalism and the Approach and Aftermath of the Civil War. Ed. Paul D. Moreno and Jonathan O'Neill. New York, NY: Fordham University Press, 2013. 55-80. Print.