Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Degree

In the mechanical and industrial engineering doctorate you'll graduate with a depth of knowledge in mechanical or industrial engineering while engaging in cutting-edge, cross-disciplinary research.


Overview

The mechanical and industrial engineering doctorate program produces graduates with a depth of knowledge in mechanical or industrial engineering while allowing students to engage in cutting-edge, cross-disciplinary research. The flexible curriculum encourages students to gain domain-specific knowledge from courses offered throughout the college’s portfolio of engineering programs. The curriculum, coupled with the depth of knowledge in mechanical or industrial engineering disciplines, creates graduates who are ready to tackle the world’s most pressing societal and industrial challenges. The program develops world-class researchers who can capitalize on the most promising discoveries and innovations to develop interdisciplinary solutions for real-world challenges.

The mechanical and industrial Ph.D. requires students to address fundamental technical problems of national and global importance for the 21st century. The program finds its roots in tackling global problems in energy, transportation, health care, communications, and manufacturing. The mechanical and industrial engineering departments offer a broad range of technological research strengths including additive and advanced manufacturing, nanotechnology, robotics and mechatronics, heat transfer and thermo-fluids, simulation, modeling and optimization, ergonomics, biomimetic systems, wearable sensors, health care data analytics, prognostics and fault detection, and energy systems. Students collaborate with faculty advisors to build on these technological strengths to solve problems of global significance in order to prepare them, and for careers in both industry and academia.

Research Assistantships

Research assistantships are available to doctoral students. Learn more about the college's research assistantship opportunities and how you can apply.

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Curriculum for Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Ph.D.

Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ph.D. degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
ENGR-701
Inter-disciplinary Research Methods
This course emphasizes collaboration in modern research environment and consists of five modules. Students will introduced to the concepts of inter-disciplinary and trans-disciplinary research conducted from both a scientific and an engineering perspective. Students will learn how to write a dissertation proposal, statement of work, timeline for their program of study and the elements of an effective literature review. Students will develop skills related to reviewing and annotating technical papers, conducting a literature search and proper citation. Students will demonstrate an understanding of (a) ethics as it relates to the responsible conduct of research, (b) ethical responsibility in the context of the engineering professions, (c) ethics as it relates to authorship and plagiarism, (d) basic criteria for ethical decision making and (e) identify professional standards and code of ethics relevant to their discipline. Students demonstrate an ability to identify and explain the potential benefits of their research discoveries to a range of stakeholders, including policy makers and the general public. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ENGR-702
Translating Discovery into Practice
This course provides graduate students with the professional skills needed by PhD graduates within their major research focus area to move the results of their research from the lab into practice. Students will demonstrate a strong contextual understanding for their research efforts. Students will learn professional skills related to Teamwork; Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Commercialization; Research Management; Policy and Societal Context; and Technical Writing. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ENGR-795
Doctoral Seminar
This seminar course presents topics of contemporary interest to graduate students enrolled in the program. Presentations include off campus speakers, and assistance with progressing on your research. Selected students and faculty may make presentations on current research under way in the department. All doctoral engineering students enrolled full time are required to attend each semester they are on campus. (Graduate standing in a technical discipline) (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Seminar 1 (Fall, Spring).
2
ENGR-892
Graduate Research
Doctoral-level research by the candidate on an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the research advisor. Students may count a maximum of 9 credits of ENGR-892 towards degree requirements. If the student enrolls cumulatively in more than 9 credits of ENGR-892, the additional credits above 9 will not be counted towards the degree. Research 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
 
Engineering Foundation 1, 2*
6
 
Discipline Concentration 1, 2†
6
Second Year
ENGR-795
Doctoral Seminar
This seminar course presents topics of contemporary interest to graduate students enrolled in the program. Presentations include off campus speakers, and assistance with progressing on your research. Selected students and faculty may make presentations on current research under way in the department. All doctoral engineering students enrolled full time are required to attend each semester they are on campus. (Graduate standing in a technical discipline) (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Seminar 1 (Fall, Spring).
1
ENGR-892
Graduate Research
Doctoral-level research by the candidate on an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the research advisor. Students may count a maximum of 9 credits of ENGR-892 towards degree requirements. If the student enrolls cumulatively in more than 9 credits of ENGR-892, the additional credits above 9 will not be counted towards the degree. Research 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
6
 
Discipline Concentration 3†
3
 
Focus Area Elective 1, 2, 3, 4‡
12
Third Year
ENGR-890
Dissertation and Research
Doctoral-level research by the candidate on an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the research advisor. Students must successfully pass the PhD Candidacy examination prior to enrolling in this course Research 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
21
Total Semester Credit Hours
66

† Discipline Concentration: Any graduate level course offered by the departments of mechanical or industrial and systems engineering, exclusive of capstones.

‡ Focus Area Elective: Any graduate level course offered by the Kate Gleason College of Engineering, exclusive of capstones.

Electives

Engineering Foundation Electives
Course
MECE-707/ENGR-707
Engineering Analysis
This course trains students to utilize mathematical techniques from an engineering perspective, and provides essential background for success in graduate level studies. An intensive review of linear and nonlinear ordinary differential equations and Laplace transforms is provided. Laplace transform methods are extended to boundary-value problems and applications to control theory are discussed. Problem solving efficiency is stressed, and to this end, the utility of various available techniques are contrasted. The frequency response of ordinary differential equations is discussed extensively. Applications of linear algebra are examined, including the use of eigenvalue analysis in the solution of linear systems and in multivariate optimization. An introduction to Fourier analysis is also provided. (Prerequisites: (MATH-241 and MATH-326) or graduate student standing in the MECE-MS or MECE-ME programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
MECE-709/ENGR-709
Advanced Engineering Mathematics
Advanced Engineering Mathematics provides the foundations for complex functions, vector calculus and advanced linear algebra and its applications in analyzing and solving a variety of mechanical engineering problems especially in the areas of mechanics, continuum mechanics, fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and vibrations. Topics include: vector algebra, vector calculus, functions of complex variables, ordinary differential equations and local stability, advanced matrix algebra, and partial differential equations. Mechanical engineering applications will be discussed throughout the course. (Prerequisites: MECE-707 or equivalent course or graduate student standing in MECE-MS or MECE-ME.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
ISEE-601
Systems Modeling and Optimization
An introductory course in operations research focusing on modeling and optimization techniques used in solving problems encountered in industrial and service systems. Topics include deterministic and stochastic modeling methodologies (e.g., linear and integer programming, Markov chains, and queuing models) in addition to decision analysis and optimization tools. These techniques will be applied to application areas such as production systems, supply chains, logistics, scheduling, healthcare, and service systems. (This course is restricted to students in the ISEE-MS, ISEE-ME. SUSTAIN-MS, SUSTAIN-ME or ENGMGT-ME program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
ISEE-760
Design of Experiments
This course presents an in-depth study of the primary concepts of experimental design. Its applied approach uses theoretical tools acquired in other mathematics and statistics courses. Emphasis is placed on the role of replication and randomization in experimentation. Numerous designs and design strategies are reviewed and implications on data analysis are discussed. Topics include: consideration of type 1 and type 2 errors in experimentation, sample size determination, completely randomized designs, randomized complete block designs, blocking and confounding in experiments, Latin square and Graeco Latin square designs, general factorial designs, the 2k factorial design system, the 3k factorial design system, fractional factorial designs, Taguchi experimentation. (Prerequisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-252 or MATH-252 or equivalent course or students in ISEE-MS, ISEE-ME, SUSTAIN-MS, SUSTAIN-ME or ENGMGT-ME programs.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
ISEE-771
Engineering of Systems I
The engineering of a system is focused on the identification of value and the value chain, requirements management and engineering, understanding the limitations of current systems, the development of the overall concept, and continually improving the robustness of the defined solution. EOS I & II is a 2-semester course sequence focused on the creation of systems that generate value for both the customer and the enterprise. Through systematic analysis and synthesis methods, novel solutions to problems are proposed and selected. This first course in the sequence focuses on the definition of the system requirements by systematic analysis of the existing problems, issues and solutions, to create an improved vision for a new system. Based on this new vision, new high-level solutions will be identified and selected for (hypothetical) further development. The focus is to learn systems engineering through a focus on an actual artifact (This course is restricted to students in the ISEE BS/MS, ISEE BS/ME, ISEE-MS, ISEE-ME, SUSTAIN-MS, SUSTAIN-ME, PRODEV-MS, MFLEAD-MS or ENGMGT-ME programs or those with 5th year standing in ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).

Admission Requirements

To be considered for admission to the doctorate program in mechanical and industrial engineering, candidates must complete a graduate application and fulfill the following requirements:

  • Complete a graduate application.
  • Hold a baccalaureate degree (or equivalent) from an accredited university or college in the physical sciences or engineering.
  • Submit official transcripts (in English) from all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
  • Have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (or equivalent).
  • Not all programs require the submission of scores from entrance exams (GMAT or GRE). Please refer to the Graduate Admission Deadlines and Requirements page for more information.
  • Submit a current resume or curriculum vitae.
  • Submit a personal statement of educational objectives which specifically addresses research interests.
  • Submit two letters of academic and/or professional recommendation.
  • International applicants whose native language is not English must submit official test scores from the TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE. A minimum TOEFL score of 94 (internet-based) is required. A minimum IELTS score of 7.0 is required. Students below the minimum requirement may be considered for conditional admission. Refer to Graduate Admission Deadlines and Requirements for additional information on English requirements. International applicants may be considered for an English test requirement waiver. Refer to Additional Requirements for International Applicants to review waiver eligibility.

Learn more about graduate admissions