Sean Sutton Headshot

Sean Sutton

Professor

Department of Political Science
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-4620
Office Location

Sean Sutton

Professor

Department of Political Science
College of Liberal Arts

Education

B.Econ., University of Queensland (Australia); MA, Ph.D., University of Dallas

585-475-4620

Select Scholarship

Book Chapter
Sutton, Sean D. "Publius the Lawgiver: The Statesmanship of The Federalist." American Statesmanship: Principles and Pracitce of Leadership. Ed. Joseph R. Fornieri, Kenneth L. Deutsch, and Sean D. Sutton. South Bend, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 2021. 59-84. Print.
Sutton, Sean D. "Marx's Economic Science and Liberal Democracy." Democracy and the History of Political Thought. Ed. Patrick N. Cain, Stephen Patrick Sims, and Stephen A. Block. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2021. 363-378. Print.
Full Length Book
Fornier, Joseph R., Kenneth L. Deutsch, and Sean D. Sutton, eds. American Statesmanship: Principles and Practice of Leadership. Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 2021. Print.
Sutton, Sean D.(ed). Biotechnology, Our Future As Human Beings and Citizens. New York, NY: SUNY Press, 2009. Print.
Sutton, Sean D. and John A. Murley. Supreme Court Against the Criminal Jury: Social Science and the Palladium of Liberty. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2014. Print.

Currently Teaching

POLS-290
3 Credits
This course examines the intersection between politics and the life sciences. The course will examine the biological approach to human behavior, paying special attention to the implications of biological explanations of behavior for political systems. Topics to be covered may include the biological approach to morality, law, and international conflict, as well as the political and policy implications of new research in the biological sciences including biotechnology.
POLS-310
3 Credits
This course examines the role of the Congress in American government. Topics studied include elections, party organization, committees, interest-group activities and executive-legislative relations.
POLS-420
3 Credits
This course examines the biological approach to the study of political order. Students will learn about the basic political structures of the great apes, how they differ, and how an understanding of these primate social structures can help us understand human political behavior. Specific topics might include the biological explanations of patriarchy and matriarchy, the biology of dominance structures, and the biology of leadership choice.
POLS-530
3 Credits
This seminar provides an opportunity to study in-depth any theme, problem or work within the discipline of political science, for example the foundations of self-government, foreign policy, international law and organizations, and the fundamental problems of international relations. Course content will be determined in consultation with the instructor. Teams of students will write a substantial paper on a topic related to the general themes of the seminar.