Materials Science and Engineering Master of science degree

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Overview

Provide solutions to a number of different fields including energy, medicine, clothing, and equipment production through the study of materials science.


The material science masters explore a fascinating area of study that contributes solutions to challenges facing fields as diverse as energy, medicine, clothing, and sporting equipment. The program is designed to satisfy individual and industry needs in the rapidly growing field of materials. The materials science degree offers a serious interdisciplinary learning experience in materials studies, crossing over the traditional boundaries of such classical disciplines like chemistry, physics, and engineering.

The MS degree in materials science and engineering offered jointly by the College of Science and the Kate Gleason College of Engineering, is designed with a variety of options to satisfy individual and industry needs in the rapidly growing field of materials.

The objectives of the program are threefold:

  • With the advent of new classes of materials and instruments, the traditional practice of empiricism in the search for and selection of materials is rapidly becoming obsolete. Therefore, the program offers a serious interdisciplinary learning experience in materials studies, crossing over the traditional boundaries of such classical disciplines like chemistry, physics, and electrical, mechanical, and microelectronic engineering.
  • The program provides extensive experimental courses in diverse areas of materials-related studies.
  • The program explores avenues for introducing greater harmony between industrial expansion and academic training.

Plan of study

A minimum of 30 credit hours is required to complete the program. This includes three required core courses, graduate electives, and either a thesis or project. The core courses are specially designed to establish a common base of materials-oriented knowledge for students with baccalaureate degrees in chemistry, chemical engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, physics, and related disciplines, providing a new intellectual identity to those involved in the study of materials.

The program has an emphasis on experimental techniques, with one required experimental course as part of the core. Additional experimental courses are available for students who wish to pursue course work in this area. These courses are organized into appropriate units covering many aspects of the analysis of materials. This aspect of the program enhances a student’s confidence when dealing with materials-related problems.

Electives

Elective courses may be selected from advanced courses offered by the School of Chemistry and Materials Science or, upon approval, from courses offered by other RIT graduate programs. Elective courses are scheduled on a periodic basis. Transfer credit may be awarded based on academic background beyond the bachelor’s degree or by examination, based on experience.

Thesis/Project

Students may choose to complete a thesis or a project as the conclusion to their program. Students who pursue the thesis option take four graduate electives, complete nine credit hours of research, and produce a thesis paper. The project option includes six graduate electives and a 3 credit hour project.

Industries


  • Scientific and Technical Consulting

  • Manufacturing

Curriculum

Materials Science and Engineering (thesis option), MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MTSE-601
Materials Science
This course provides an understanding of the relationship between structure and properties necessary for the development of new materials. Topics include atomic and crystal structure, crystalline defects, diffusion, theories, strengthening mechanisms, ferrous alloys, cast irons, structure of ceramics and polymeric materials and corrosion principles. Term paper on materials topic.
3
MTSE-704
Theoretical Methods in Materials Science and Engineering
This course includes the treatment of vector analysis, special functions, waves, and fields; Maxwell Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac distributions, and their applications. Selected topics of interest in electrodynamics, fluid mechanics, and statistical mechanics will also be discussed.
3
MTSE-705
Experimental Techniques
The course will introduce the students to laboratory equipment for hardness testing, impact testing, tensile testing, X-ray diffraction, SEM, and thermal treatment of metallic materials. Experiments illustrating the characterization of high molecular weight organic polymers will be performed.
3
MTSE-790
Research & Thesis
Dissertation research by the candidate for an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the research advisor.
6
 
Graduate Electives
12
Second Year
MTSE-790
Research & Thesis
Dissertation research by the candidate for an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the research advisor.
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
30

Materials Science and Engineering (project option), MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MTSE-601 
Materials Science
This course provides an understanding of the relationship between structure and properties necessary for the development of new materials. Topics include atomic and crystal structure, crystalline defects, diffusion, theories, strengthening mechanisms, ferrous alloys, cast irons, structure of ceramics and polymeric materials and corrosion principles. Term paper on materials topic.
3
MTSE-704
Theoretical Methods in Materials Science and Engineering
This course includes the treatment of vector analysis, special functions, waves, and fields; Maxwell Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac distributions, and their applications. Selected topics of interest in electrodynamics, fluid mechanics, and statistical mechanics will also be discussed.
3
MTSE-705
Experimental Techniques
The course will introduce the students to laboratory equipment for hardness testing, impact testing, tensile testing, X-ray diffraction, SEM, and thermal treatment of metallic materials. Experiments illustrating the characterization of high molecular weight organic polymers will be performed.
3
MTSE-777
Graduate Project
This course is a capstone project using research facilities available inside or outside of RIT.
2
 
Graduate Electives
12
Second Year
MTSE-777
Graduate Project
This course is a capstone project using research facilities available inside or outside of RIT.
1
 
Graduate Electives
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
30

 

Admission Requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS program in materials science and engineering, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

  • Complete a graduate application.
  • Hold a baccalaureate degree (or equivalent) from an accredited university or college in chemistry, physics, chemical engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, or a related field.
  • Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
  • Submit two letters of recommendation from academic or professional sources.
  • International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE. A minimum TOEFL score of 90 (internet-based) is required. A minimum IELTS score of 6.5 is required. The English language test score requirement is waived for native speakers of English or for those submitting transcripts from degrees earned at American institutions.

Candidates not meeting the general requirements may petition for admission to the program. In such cases, it may be suggested that the necessary background courses be taken at the undergraduate level. However, undergraduate credits that make up deficiencies may not be counted toward the master’s degree.

Any student who wishes to study at the graduate level must first be admitted to the program. However, an applicant may be permitted to take graduate courses as a nonmatriculated student if they meet the general requirements mentioned above.

 

Learn about admissions and financial aid 

Additional Info

Part-time study

The program offers courses in the late afternoon and evenings to encourage practicing scientists and engineers to pursue the degree program without interrupting their employment. (This may not apply to courses offered off campus at selected industrial sites.) Students employed full time are normally limited to a maximum of two courses, or 6 credit hours, each semester. A student who wishes to register for more than 6 credit hours must obtain the permission of his or her adviser.

Maximum limit on time

University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.