News
Matt Huenerfauth

  • January 31, 2022

    student wearing sensors on her head adjusts a robotic arm.

    AI research collaboration begins

    Cecilia Alm, an associate professor in RIT’s College of Liberal Arts, was awarded nearly $2 million by the National Science Foundation to lead a team of RIT faculty addressing a lack of diversity in the artificial intelligence research community and gaps in AI curricula.

  • June 30, 2020

    Matt Huenerfauth.

    Matt Huenerfauth named director of iSchool in GCCIS

    Matt Huenerfauth, a professor and expert in computing accessibility research, has been named director of RIT’s iSchool (School of Information). Huenerfauth takes the helm Aug. 1 from Stephen Zilora, who is stepping down after eight years of leadership.

  • May 6, 2020

    student Peter Yeung.

    RIT graduate Peter Yeung found perfect fit within university’s deaf community

    Eight years ago, as a high school junior, Peter Yeung participated in NTID's Explore Your Future, a program that introduces deaf and hard-of-hearing high schoolers to career opportunities. Today, Yeung is an RIT/NTID graduate who has completed three degrees and has started his career as a user experience architect with the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency in Springfield, Va.

  • May 15, 2019

    Student wearing eye-tracking headset stands with another student holding laptop.

    RIT research helps artificial intelligence be more accurate, fair and inclusive

    RIT has received a grant from the National Science Foundation to help make artificial intelligence smarter and more inclusive. The grant creates the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Site in Computational Sensing for Human-centered AI and will allow a total of 30 undergraduate students from across the country to spend 10 weeks at RIT.

  • March 13, 2019

    Head-and-shoulders view of man with glasses

    New research unlocking the secrets of how languages change

    New research is helping scientists around the world understand what drives language change, especially when languages are in their infancy. The results will shed light on how the limitations of the human brain change language and provide an understanding of the complex interaction between languages and the human beings who use them.

  • November 20, 2018

    Improving ASL communication

    Matt Huenerfauth and his research team are developing animations of American Sign Language—a language that requires precise control of hand and body movement as well as facial expressions.