Electrical Engineering bachelor of science degree

6dd74e01-d204-4986-be42-b0179b904b24 | 86023

Overview

Synthesize science, mathematics, technology, and application-oriented designs into world-class consumer products, timely microprocessors, state-of-the-art computers, advanced electronic components, and much more.


Electrical engineers synthesize science, mathematics, technology, and application-oriented designs into world-class consumer products, timely microprocessors, state-of-the-art computers, advanced electronic components, and much more. From cutting-edge technology revolutions to real life applications, the innovations of electrical engineers continue to lead the future and elevate the standards in the marketplace. With a shortage of electrical engineering talent in the job market, the demand for graduates with an electrical engineering degree remains at an all time high.

Electrical engineering addresses the high-technology needs of business and industry by offering a rich academic program that includes analog and digital integrated circuits, digital signal processing, radiation and propagation, power electronics, control systems, communications, circuit theory, computer architecture, computer-aided design, embedded systems, solid-state devices, microelectromechanical systems (MEMs), and robotics.

The major prepares students for exciting careers within the varied electrical engineering and allied disciplines and for positions in business management. Graduates also have the foundation to pursue advanced study at the most prestigious graduate schools.

The curriculum, co-op program, and facilities are designed to accomplish the program’s educational objectives. Since the ability to design is an essential part of electrical engineering, students are presented with challenging design problems in a number of courses, beginning with Freshman Practicum (EEEE-105) in the first year.

To strengthen students’ applied knowledge, laboratories are an integral part of many courses. The department offers a number of classes in studio-style lecture labs, where the instructor presents the lecture in a fully instrumented room that allows immediate observation and implementation of important engineering ideas. Many of our alumni report that the college’s facilities are comparable to the best in the industry.

A highlight of the applied engineering experience is the senior project. Students work on a challenging project under the tutelage of an experienced faculty adviser. While experiencing the satisfaction of completing an interesting project and exploring the latest in technology, students develop engineering management and project organization skills, learn to communicate their ideas effectively within a multidisciplinary team, and present their project and ideas to a diverse audience of students, faculty, and industrial partners.

Educational objectives

The electrical engineering faculty, in conjunction with its constituents, have established the following educational objectives. Graduates will:

  • Have a strong foundation in mathematics and basic sciences, and core electrical engineering fundamental knowledge and abilities necessary for specialization in all areas of electrical engineering.
  • Develop problem solving and design skills for devising and evaluating solutions to electrical engineering problems, including design of components, systems, and experiments.
  • Be well-informed about present and emerging technologies significant to electrical engineering.
  • Be well-prepared for graduate education.
  • Embrace and foster an environment that encourages creativity and enthusiasm for life-long learning.
  • Develop professional attributes that include communication skills, teamwork, ethics, and an appreciation for other disciplines, both technical and non-technical, in order to deal with the impact of technology in a global, societal, and organizational context.

Accreditation

The BS in electrical engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org. Visit the college's accreditation page for information on enrollment and graduation data, program educational objectives, and student outcomes.

Plan of study

The first two years of the curriculum are devoted to establishing a foundation in mathematics and the physical science, which is essential to the study of electrical engineering. In other courses, students learn about electrical engineering principles such as circuits and digital systems. Practicum courses introduce students to electrical engineering practice and computer-aided design (CAD) tools that are used throughout the five-year program.

In the third and fourth years, students focus on the subjects that form the core of electrical engineering. Courses in circuits, electronics, linear systems, electromagnetic fields, semiconductor devices, communication systems, control systems, and microelectromechanical systems are taught.

During the fifth year, students specialize in an area of professional interest. They complete a senior design project as part of the graduation requirements.

Options

Students may develop a focus area in one of three options. Students complete all the required courses for the BS in electrical engineering and choose their free and professional electives from a specified set of courses in one of the following areas.

Clean and renewable energy

Because of the environmental impact, it has become critical that electrical energy be developed from sources that do not pollute the atmosphere, preferably from renewable sources like wind and solar energy. It is equally important that existing electrical generation and distribution systems become more efficient. In the future, research and development in clean and renewable energy will grow at a rate much faster than other areas. Both industry and the federal government are increasing their efforts and financial investment in this area.

Computer engineering

The computer engineering option is ideal for students interested in designing modern computing systems. Students gain knowledge in areas ranging from C programming, object-oriented programming, assembly language, microprocessor interfacing, and logic design to data structures and computer operating systems.

Robotics

The robotics option provides students with the theoretical and practical skills required to design robots and robotic devices. Students study advanced programming, robotic systems, principles of robotics, advanced robotics, kinematics and dynamics of robotics manipulators, mobile robots, locomotion types, and complete experiments using various arm and mobile robots. Advanced robotics courses include the dynamics of manipulators and the dynamics of mobile robots with advanced locomotion techniques and path planning.

Wireless communication option

The wireless communication option has been discontinued and is not accepting new students. Currently enrolled students will not be affected by this change.

The wireless communications option is ideal for those who want to incorporate the theoretical and practical skills required for understanding, designing, and evaluating wireless communication systems. Wireless communications is a critical enabling technology for many modern products and services. Examples include: mobile telephony, remote Internet access, consumer electronics, medical devices, and location-based services. Students in the wireless communications option take an introductory course addressing wireless communications from a systems perspective. The course covers modern products and services enabled via wireless communication. In the two years that follow, students take a course sequence covering analog communication, digital data communication, and communication over wireless channels. This sequence builds a core of knowledge in the transmission of signals to carry information wirelessly in various practical scenarios. The sequence is complemented with a course covering basic principles in communication networks and the Internet.

Industries


  • Electronic and Computer Hardware

  • Computer Networking

  • Defense

  • Aerospace

  • Automotive

Typical Job Titles

Electrical Engineer Design Engineer
Research Engineer Project Engineer
Applications Engineer Scientist
Controls Engineer Software Engineer
Systems Engineer Reliability Engineer

99%

outcome rate of graduates

$70k

median first-year salary of graduates

Latest News

Curriculum

Electrical engineering, BS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MATH-181
Project-Based Calculus I
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals.
4
MATH-182
Project-Based Calculus II
This is the second in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates.
4
CHMG-131
General Chemistry for Engineers
This rigorous course is primarily for, but not limited to, engineering students. Topics include an introduction to some basic concepts in chemistry, stoichiometry, First Law of Thermodynamics, thermochemistry, electronic theory of composition and structure, and chemical bonding. The lecture is supported by workshop-style problem sessions. Offered in traditional and online format.
3
EEEE-105
Freshman Practicum
Introduction to the practice of electrical engineering including understanding laboratory practice, identifying electronic components, operating generic electronic instruments, building an electronic circuit (Wein Bridge oscillator), measuring and capturing an electronic waveform, schematic entry, modeling, and simulation of an electronic circuit (SPICE or equivalent), analyzing a waveform using a commercial software package (MATLAB), and building and studying an amplitude modulation radio receiver. This studio style lab course emphasizes a learn-by-doing approach to introduce the student to electrical engineering design practices and tools used throughout the undergraduate program and professional career. Each student will prototype and build a functioning electronic circuit.
1
PHYS-211
University Physics I
This is a course in calculus-based physics for science and engineering majors. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton's Laws, gravitation, work and energy, momentum and impulse, conservation laws, systems of particles, rotational motion, static equilibrium, mechanical oscillations and waves, and data presentation/analysis. The course is taught in a workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses.
4
EEEE-120
Digital Systems I
This course introduces the student to the basic components and methodologies used in digital systems design. It is usually the student's first exposure to engineering design. The laboratory component consists of small design, implement, and debug projects. The complexity of these projects increases steadily throughout the quarter, starting with circuits of a few gates, until small systems containing several tens of gates and memory elements. Topics include: Boolean algebra, synthesis and analysis of combinational logic circuits, arithmetic circuits, memory elements, synthesis and analysis of sequential logic circuits, finite state machines, and data transfers.
3
 ACSC-010
Year One
The Year One class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, personal success, leadership development, social responsibility and life academic skills awareness and application. Year One is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build relationships and help them become an integral part of the campus community.
0
 
First Year Writing
3
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
 
First Year LAS Elective
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
MATH-221 
Multivariable and Vector Calculus
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes a study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, Stokes' Theorem, Green's Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-219.
4
PHYS-212
University Physics II
This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses.
4
CMPR-271
Computational Problem Solving for Engineers
This course introduces computational problem solving. Basic problem-solving techniques and algorithm development through the process of top-down stepwise refinement and functional decomposition are introduced throughout the course. Classical numerical problems encountered in science and engineering are used to demonstrate the development of algorithms and their implementations. May not be taken for credit by Computer Science, Software Engineering, or Computer Engineering majors. This course is designed for Electrical Engineering and Micro-Electronic Engineering majors and students interested in the Electrical Engineering minor.
3
EEEE-281
Circuits I
Covers basics of DC circuit analysis starting with the definition of voltage, current, resistance, power and energy. Linearity and superposition, together with Kirchhoff's laws, are applied to analysis of circuits having series, parallel and other combinations of circuit elements. Thevenin, Norton and maximum power transfer theorems are proved and applied. Circuits with ideal op-amps are introduced. Inductance and capacitance are introduced and the transient response of RL, RC and RLC circuits to step inputs is established. Practical aspects of the properties of passive devices and batteries are discussed, as are the characteristics of battery-powered circuitry. The laboratory component incorporates use of both computer and manually controlled instrumentation including power supplies, signal generators and oscilloscopes to reinforce concepts discussed in class as well as circuit design and simulation software.
3
EEEE-282
Circuits II
This course covers the fundamentals of AC circuit analysis starting with the study of sinusoidal steady-state solutions for circuits in the time domain. The complex plane is introduced along with the concepts of complex exponential functions, phasors, impedances and admittances. Nodal, loop and mesh methods of analysis as well as Thevenin and related theorems are applied to the complex plane. The concept of complex power is developed. The analysis of mutual induction as applied to coupled-coils. Linear, ideal and non-ideal transformers are introduced. Complex frequency analysis is introduced to enable discussion of transfer functions, frequency dependent behavior, Bode plots, resonance phenomenon and simple filter circuits. Two-port network theory is developed and applied to circuits and interconnections.
3
MATH-231
Differential Equations
This course is an introduction to the study of ordinary differential equations and their applications. Topics include solutions to first order equations and linear second order equations, method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, linear independence and the Wronskian, vibrating systems, and Laplace transforms.
3
EEEE-260
Introduction to Semiconductor Devices
An introductory course on the fundamentals of semiconductor physics and principles of operation of basic devices. Topics include semiconductor fundamentals (crystal structure, statistical physics of carrier concentration, motion in crystals, energy band models, drift and diffusion currents) as well as the operation of pn junction diodes, bipolar junction transistors (BJT), metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors and MOS field-effect transistors.
3
EEEE-220
Digital Systems II
In the first part, the course covers the design of digital systems using a hardware description language. In the second part, it covers the design of large digital systems using the computer design methodology, and culminates with the design of a reduced instruction set central processing unit, associated memory and input/output peripherals. The course focuses on the design, capture, simulation, and verification of major hardware components such as: the datapath, the control unit, the central processing unit, the system memory, and the I/O modules. The lab sessions enforce and complement the concepts and design principles exposed in the lecture through the use of CAD tools and emulation in a commercial FPGA. This course assumes a background in C programming.
3
EGEN-099
Engineering Co-op Preparation
This course will prepare students, who are entering their second year of study, for both the job search and employment in the field of engineering. Students will learn strategies for conducting a successful job search, including the preparation of resumes and cover letters; behavioral interviewing techniques and effective use of social media in the application process. Professional and ethical responsibilities during the job search and for co-op and subsequent professional experiences will be discussed.
0
 
Restricted Elective
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
Third Year
MATH-381
Complex Variables
This course covers the algebra of complex numbers, analytic functions, Cauchy-Riemann equations, complex integration, Cauchy's integral theorem and integral formulas, Taylor and Laurent series, residues, and the calculation of real-valued integrals by complex-variable methods.
3
EEEE-374
Electromagnetic Fields and Transmission Lines
The course provides the foundations of EM fields, static and time varying, and a study of propagation, reflection and transmissions of electromagnetic waves in unbounded regions and in transmission lines. Topics include the following: electric field intensity and potential, Guass' Law, polarization, electric flux density, dielectric constant and boundary conditions, Poisson's and Laplace's equations, methods of images, steady electric current and conduction current density, vector magnetic potential, Biot-Savart law, magnetization, magnetic field intensity, permeability, boundary conditions, Faraday's law, Maxwell's equations and the continuity equation. Time harmonic EM fields, wave equations, uniform plane waves, polarization, Poynting theorem and power, reflection and transmission from multiple dielectric interfaces, transmission line equations, transients on transmission lines, pulse and step excitations, reflection diagrams, sinusoidal steady state solutions, standing waves, the Smith Chart and impedance matching techniques, TE and TM waves in rectangular waveguides. experiments using state-of-art RF equipment illustrating fundamental wave propagation and reflection concepts, design projects with state-of-art EM modeling tools.
4
EEEE-353
Linear Systems
Linear Systems provides the foundations of continuous and discrete signal and system analysis and modeling. Topics include a description of continuous linear systems via differential equations, a description of discrete systems via difference equations, input-output relationship of continuous and discrete linear systems, the continuous time convolution integral, the discrete time convolution sum, application of convolution principles to system response calculations, exponential and trigonometric forms of Fourier series and their properties, Fourier transforms including energy spectrum and energy spectral density. Sampling of continuous time signals and the sampling theorem, the Laplace, Z and DTFT. The solution of differential equations and circuit analysis problems using Laplace transforms, transfer functions of physical systems, block diagram algebra and transfer function realization is also covered. A comprehensive study of the z transform and its inverse, which includes system transfer function concepts, system frequency response and its interpretation, and the relationship of the z transform to the Fourier and Laplace transform is also covered. Finally, an introduction to the design of digital filters, which includes filter block diagrams for Finite Impulse Response (FIR) and Infinite Impulse Response (IIR) filters is introduced.
4
EEEE-380
Digital Electronics 
This is an introductory course in digital MOS circuit analysis and design. The course covers the following topics: (1) MOSFET I-V behavior in aggressively scaled devices; (2) Static and dynamic characteristics of NMOS and CMOS inverters; (3) Combinational and sequential logic networks using CMOS technology; (4) Dynamic CMOS logic networks, including precharge-evaluate, domino and transmission gate circuits; (5) Special topics, including static and dynamic MOS memory, and interconnect RLC behavior.
3
 
LAS Immersion 1
3
 
Cooperative Education (fall and summer)
Co-op
Fourth Year
MATH-251
Probability and Statistics I
This course introduces sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability and independence, distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions (discrete and continuous), the central limit theorem, descriptive statistics, interval estimation, and applications of probability and statistics to real-world problems. A statistical package such as Minitab or R is used for data analysis and statistical applications.
3
EEEE-420
Embedded Systems Design
The purpose of this course is to expose students to both the hardware and the software components of a digital embedded system. It focuses on the boundary between hardware and software operations. Students will learn about a computer system from various abstraction levels from the digital logic gates to software applications. This course will also provide a solid foundation in computer systems architecture. The course focuses on the major hardware components such as: datapaths, the control unit, the central processing unit, the system memory, the I/O modules and on instruction set architectures. The lab sessions will cover the design, simulation and implementation of a 4-bit microprocessor core.
3
EEEE-414
Classical Control
This course introduces students to the study of linear continuous-time classical control systems, their behavior, design, and use in augmenting engineering system performance. The course is based on classical control methods using Laplace-transforms, block-diagrams, root-locus, and frequency-domain analysis. Topics include: Laplace-transform review; Bode plot review; system modeling for control; relationships of transfer-function poles and zeros to time-response behaviors; stability analysis; steady-state error, error constants, and error specification; feedback control properties; relationships between stability margins and transient behavior; lead, lag, and PID control; root-locus analysis and design; frequency-response design and Nyquist stability. A laboratory will provide students with hands-on analysis and design-build-test experience, and includes the use of computer-aided design software such as MATLAB.
3
EEEE-480
Analog Electronics 
This is an introductory course in analog electronic circuit analysis and design. The course covers the following topics: (1) Diode circuit DC and small-signal behavior, including rectifying as well as Zener-diode-based voltage regulation; (2) MOSFET current-voltage characteristics; (3) DC biasing of MOSFET circuits, including integrated-circuit current sources; (4) Small-signal analysis of single-transistor MOSFET amplifiers and differential amplifiers; (5) Multi-stage MOSFET amplifiers, such as cascade amplifiers, and operational amplifiers; (6) Frequency response of MOSFET-based single- and multi-stage amplifiers; (7) DC and small-signal analysis and design of bipolar junction transistor (BJT) devices and circuits; (8) Feedback and stability in MOSFET and BJT amplifiers.
4
 
Cooperative Education (Spring) Co-op
 
 
Free Elective
3
Fifth Year
EEEE-484
Communication Systems (WI)
Introduction to Communication Systems provides the basics of the formation, transmission and reception of information over communication channels. Spectral density and correlation descriptions for deterministic and stationary random signals. Amplitude and angle modulation methods (e.g. AM and FM) for continuous signals. Carrier detection and synchronization. Phase-locked loop and its application. Introduction to digital communication. Binary ASK, FSK and PSK. Noise effects. Optimum detection: matched filters, maximum-likelihood reception. Computer simulation.
3
EEEE-497
Senior Design I
MSD-I is the first half of a two-semester design course oriented to the solution of engineering problems. The mission is to enhance engineering education through a capstone design experience that integrates engineering theory, principles and processes within a collaborative environment. Working in multidisciplinary teams and following an engineering design process, students will assess customer needs and engineering specifications, evaluate concepts, resolve major technical hurdles, and employ rigorous engineering principles to design a prototype which is fully tested and documented.
3
EEEE-498
Senior Design II
MSD-II is the second half of a two-semester design course oriented to the solution of engineering problems. The mission is to enhance engineering education through a capstone design experience that integrates engineering theory, principles and processes within a collaborative environment. Working in multidisciplinary teams and following an engineering design process, students will assess customer needs and engineering specifications, evaluate concepts, resolve major technical hurdles, and employ rigorous engineering principles to design a prototype which is fully tested and documented.
3
EEEE-483
Mechatronics
Fundamental principles of electric machines are covered. Sensors and actuators are studied. The primary actuators discussed are high-performance electromechanical motion devices such as permanent-magnet DC, synchronous and stepper motors. Topics in power electronics and control of electromechanical systems are studied. High-performance MATLAB environment is used to simulate, analyze and control mechatronic systems. Application of digital signal processors and microcontrollers in mechatronics are introduced. Case studies are covered.
3
 
Professional Electives
9
 
LAS Immersion 2, 3
6
 
Free Elective
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
129

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Accelerated dual degree options

Accelerated dual degree options are for undergraduate students with outstanding academic records. Upon acceptance, well-qualified undergraduate students can begin graduate study before completing their BS degree, shortening the time it takes to earn both degrees. Students should consult an academic adviser for more information.

Electrical engineering, BS/MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
EEEE-105
Freshman Practicum
Introduction to the practice of electrical engineering including understanding laboratory practice, identifying electronic components, operating generic electronic instruments, building an electronic circuit (Wein Bridge oscillator), measuring and capturing an electronic waveform, schematic entry, modeling, and simulation of an electronic circuit (SPICE or equivalent), analyzing a waveform using a commercial software package (MATLAB), and building and studying an amplitude modulation radio receiver. This studio style lab course emphasizes a learn-by-doing approach to introduce the student to electrical engineering design practices and tools used throughout the undergraduate program and professional career. Each student will prototype and build a functioning electronic circuit.
1
MATH-181
Project-Based Calculus I
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals.
4
MATH-182
Project-Based Calculus II
This is the second in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates.
4
CHMG-131
General Chemistry for Engineers
This rigorous course is primarily for, but not limited to, engineering students. Topics include an introduction to some basic concepts in chemistry, stoichiometry, First Law of Thermodynamics, thermochemistry, electronic theory of composition and structure, and chemical bonding. The lecture is supported by workshop-style problem sessions. Offered in traditional and online format.
3
PHYS-211
University Physics I
This is a course in calculus-based physics for science and engineering majors. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton's Laws, gravitation, work and energy, momentum and impulse, conservation laws, systems of particles, rotational motion, static equilibrium, mechanical oscillations and waves, and data presentation/analysis. The course is taught in a workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses.
4
EEEE-120
Digital Systems I
This course introduces the student to the basic components and methodologies used in digital systems design. It is usually the student's first exposure to engineering design. The laboratory component consists of small design, implement, and debug projects. The complexity of these projects increases steadily throughout the quarter, starting with circuits of a few gates, until small systems containing several tens of gates and memory elements. Topics include: Boolean algebra, synthesis and analysis of combinational logic circuits, arithmetic circuits, memory elements, synthesis and analysis of sequential logic circuits, finite state machines, and data transfers.
3
ACSC-010
Year One
The Year One class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, personal success, leadership development, social responsibility and life academic skills awareness and application. Year One is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build relationships and help them become an integral part of the campus community.
0
 
First Year LAS Elective
3
 
First Year Writing 
3
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
 
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
MATH-221
Multivariable and Vector Calculus
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes a study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, Stokes' Theorem, Green's Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-219.
4
PHYS-212
University Physics II
This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses.
4
CMPR-271
Computational Problem Solving for Engineers
This course introduces computational problem solving. Basic problem-solving techniques and algorithm development through the process of top-down stepwise refinement and functional decomposition are introduced throughout the course. Classical numerical problems encountered in science and engineering are used to demonstrate the development of algorithms and their implementations. May not be taken for credit by Computer Science, Software Engineering, or Computer Engineering majors. This course is designed for Electrical Engineering and Micro-Electronic Engineering majors and students interested in the Electrical Engineering minor.
3
EEEE-281
Circuits I
Covers basics of DC circuit analysis starting with the definition of voltage, current, resistance, power and energy. Linearity and superposition, together with Kirchhoff's laws, are applied to analysis of circuits having series, parallel and other combinations of circuit elements. Thevenin, Norton and maximum power transfer theorems are proved and applied. Circuits with ideal op-amps are introduced. Inductance and capacitance are introduced and the transient response of RL, RC and RLC circuits to step inputs is established. Practical aspects of the properties of passive devices and batteries are discussed, as are the characteristics of battery-powered circuitry. The laboratory component incorporates use of both computer and manually controlled instrumentation including power supplies, signal generators and oscilloscopes to reinforce concepts discussed in class as well as circuit design and simulation software.
3
EEEE-282
Circuits II
This course covers the fundamentals of AC circuit analysis starting with the study of sinusoidal steady-state solutions for circuits in the time domain. The complex plane is introduced along with the concepts of complex exponential functions, phasors, impedances and admittances. Nodal, loop and mesh methods of analysis as well as Thevenin and related theorems are applied to the complex plane. The concept of complex power is developed. The analysis of mutual induction as applied to coupled-coils. Linear, ideal and non-ideal transformers are introduced. Complex frequency analysis is introduced to enable discussion of transfer functions, frequency dependent behavior, Bode plots, resonance phenomenon and simple filter circuits. Two-port network theory is developed and applied to circuits and interconnections.
3
MATH-231
Differential Equations
This course is an introduction to the study of ordinary differential equations and their applications. Topics include solutions to first order equations and linear second order equations, method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, linear independence and the Wronskian, vibrating systems, and Laplace transforms.
3
EEEE-260
Semiconductor Devices
An introductory course on the fundamentals of semiconductor physics and principles of operation of basic devices. Topics include semiconductor fundamentals (crystal structure, statistical physics of carrier concentration, motion in crystals, energy band models, drift and diffusion currents) as well as the operation of pn junction diodes, bipolar junction transistors (BJT), metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors and MOS field-effect transistors.
3
EEEE-220
Digital Systems II
In the first part, the course covers the design of digital systems using a hardware description language. In the second part, it covers the design of large digital systems using the computer design methodology, and culminates with the design of a reduced instruction set central processing unit, associated memory and input/output peripherals. The course focuses on the design, capture, simulation, and verification of major hardware components such as: the datapath, the control unit, the central processing unit, the system memory, and the I/O modules. The lab sessions enforce and complement the concepts and design principles exposed in the lecture through the use of CAD tools and emulation in a commercial FPGA. This course assumes a background in C programming.
3
EGEN-099
Engineering Co-op Preparation
This course will prepare students, who are entering their second year of study, for both the job search and employment in the field of engineering. Students will learn strategies for conducting a successful job search, including the preparation of resumes and cover letters; behavioral interviewing techniques and effective use of social media in the application process. Professional and ethical responsibilities during the job search and for co-op and subsequent professional experiences will be discussed.
0
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
Restricted Elective
3
Third Year
MATH-381
Complex Variables
This course covers the algebra of complex numbers, analytic functions, Cauchy-Riemann equations, complex integration, Cauchy's integral theorem and integral formulas, Taylor and Laurent series, residues, and the calculation of real-valued integrals by complex-variable methods.
3
EEEE-374
Electromagnetic Fields and Transmission Lines
The course provides the foundations of EM fields, static and time varying, and a study of propagation, reflection and transmissions of electromagnetic waves in unbounded regions and in transmission lines. Topics include the following: electric field intensity and potential, Guass' Law, polarization, electric flux density, dielectric constant and boundary conditions, Poisson's and Laplace's equations, methods of images, steady electric current and conduction current density, vector magnetic potential, Biot-Savart law, magnetization, magnetic field intensity, permeability, boundary conditions, Faraday's law, Maxwell's equations and the continuity equation. Time harmonic EM fields, wave equations, uniform plane waves, polarization, Poynting theorem and power, reflection and transmission from multiple dielectric interfaces, transmission line equations, transients on transmission lines, pulse and step excitations, reflection diagrams, sinusoidal steady state solutions, standing waves, the Smith Chart and impedance matching techniques, TE and TM waves in rectangular waveguides. experiments using state-of-art RF equipment illustrating fundamental wave propagation and reflection concepts, design projects with state-of-art EM modeling tools.
4
EEEE-353
Linear Systems
Linear Systems provides the foundations of continuous and discrete signal and system analysis and modeling. Topics include a description of continuous linear systems via differential equations, a description of discrete systems via difference equations, input-output relationship of continuous and discrete linear systems, the continuous time convolution integral, the discrete time convolution sum, application of convolution principles to system response calculations, exponential and trigonometric forms of Fourier series and their properties, Fourier transforms including energy spectrum and energy spectral density. Sampling of continuous time signals and the sampling theorem, the Laplace, Z and DTFT. The solution of differential equations and circuit analysis problems using Laplace transforms, transfer functions of physical systems, block diagram algebra and transfer function realization is also covered. A comprehensive study of the z transform and its inverse, which includes system transfer function concepts, system frequency response and its interpretation, and the relationship of the z transform to the Fourier and Laplace transform is also covered. Finally, an introduction to the design of digital filters, which includes filter block diagrams for Finite Impulse Response (FIR) and Infinite Impulse Response (IIR) filters is introduced.
4
EEEE-380
Digital Electronics
This is an introductory course in digital MOS circuit analysis and design. The course covers the following topics: (1) MOSFET I-V behavior in aggressively scaled devices; (2) Static and dynamic characteristics of NMOS and CMOS inverters; (3) Combinational and sequential logic networks using CMOS technology; (4) Dynamic CMOS logic networks, including precharge-evaluate, domino and transmission gate circuits; (5) Special topics, including static and dynamic MOS memory, and interconnect RLC behavior.
3
 
LAS Immersion I
3
 
Cooperative Education (fall and summer)
Co-op
Fourth Year
MATH-251
Probability and Statistics I
This course introduces sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability and independence, distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions (discrete and continuous), the central limit theorem, descriptive statistics, interval estimation, and applications of probability and statistics to real-world problems. A statistical package such as Minitab or R is used for data analysis and statistical applications.
3
EEEE-420
Embedded Systems Design
The purpose of this course is to expose students to both the hardware and the software components of a digital embedded system. It focuses on the boundary between hardware and software operations. Students will learn about a computer system from various abstraction levels from the digital logic gates to software applications. This course will also provide a solid foundation in computer systems architecture. The course focuses on the major hardware components such as: datapaths, the control unit, the central processing unit, the system memory, the I/O modules and on instruction set architectures. The lab sessions will cover the design, simulation and implementation of a 4-bit microprocessor core.
3
EEEE-414
Classical Control
This course introduces students to the study of linear continuous-time classical control systems, their behavior, design, and use in augmenting engineering system performance. The course is based on classical control methods using Laplace-transforms, block-diagrams, root-locus, and frequency-domain analysis. Topics include: Laplace-transform review; Bode plot review; system modeling for control; relationships of transfer-function poles and zeros to time-response behaviors; stability analysis; steady-state error, error constants, and error specification; feedback control properties; relationships between stability margins and transient behavior; lead, lag, and PID control; root-locus analysis and design; frequency-response design and Nyquist stability. A laboratory will provide students with hands-on analysis and design-build-test experience, and includes the use of computer-aided design software such as MATLAB.
3
EEEE-480
Analog Electronics
This is an introductory course in analog electronic circuit analysis and design. The course covers the following topics: (1) Diode circuit DC and small-signal behavior, including rectifying as well as Zener-diode-based voltage regulation; (2) MOSFET current-voltage characteristics; (3) DC biasing of MOSFET circuits, including integrated-circuit current sources; (4) Small-signal analysis of single-transistor MOSFET amplifiers and differential amplifiers; (5) Multi-stage MOSFET amplifiers, such as cascade amplifiers, and operational amplifiers; (6) Frequency response of MOSFET-based single- and multi-stage amplifiers; (7) DC and small-signal analysis and design of bipolar junction transistor (BJT) devices and circuits; (8) Feedback and stability in MOSFET and BJT amplifiers.
4
EEEE-484
Communication Systems (WI)
Introduction to Communication Systems provides the basics of the formation, transmission and reception of information over communication channels. Spectral density and correlation descriptions for deterministic and stationary random signals. Amplitude and angle modulation methods (e.g. AM and FM) for continuous signals. Carrier detection and synchronization. Phase-locked loop and its application. Introduction to digital communication. Binary ASK, FSK and PSK. Noise effects. Optimum detection: matched filters, maximum-likelihood reception. Computer simulation.
3
EEEE-602
Random Signals and Noise
In this course the student is introduced to random variables and stochastic processes. Topics covered are probability theory, conditional probability and Bayes theorem, discrete and continuous random variables, distribution and density functions, moments and characteristic functions, functions of one and several random variables, Gaussian random variables and the central limit theorem, estimation theory , random processes, stationarity and ergodicity, auto correlation, cross-correlation and power spectrum density, response of linear prediction, Wiener filtering, elements of detection, matched filters.
3
EEEE-707
Engineering Analysis
This course trains students to utilize mathematical techniques from an engineering perspective, and provides essential background for success in graduate level studies. An intensive review of linear and nonlinear ordinary differential equations and Laplace transforms is provided. Laplace transform methods are extended to boundary-value problems and applications to control theory are discussed. Problem solving efficiency is stressed, and to this end, the utility of various available techniques are contrasted. The frequency response of ordinary differential equations is discussed extensively. Applications of linear algebra are examined, including the use of eigenvalue analysis in the solution of linear systems and in multivariate optimization. An introduction to Fourier analysis is also provided.
3
EEEE-497
Senior Design I
MSD-I is the first half of a two-semester design course oriented to the solution of engineering problems. The mission is to enhance engineering education through a capstone design experience that integrates engineering theory, principles and processes within a collaborative environment. Working in multidisciplinary teams and following an engineering design process, students will assess customer needs and engineering specifications, evaluate concepts, resolve major technical hurdles, and employ rigorous engineering principles to design a prototype which is fully tested and documented.
3
 
Graduate Seminar
0
 
LAS Immersion 2
3
 
Free Elective
3
Fifth Year
EEEE-498
Senior Design II
MSD-II is the second half of a two-semester design course oriented to the solution of engineering problems. The mission is to enhance engineering education through a capstone design experience that integrates engineering theory, principles and processes within a collaborative environment. Working in multidisciplinary teams and following an engineering design process, students will assess customer needs and engineering specifications, evaluate concepts, resolve major technical hurdles, and employ rigorous engineering principles to design a prototype which is fully tested and documented.
3
EEEE-709
Advanced Engineering Math
Advanced Engineering Mathematics provides the foundations for complex functions, vector calculus and advanced linear algebra and its applications in analyzing and solving a variety of electrical engineering problems especially in the areas of control, circuit analysis, communication, and signal/image processing. Topics include: complex functions, complex integration, special matrices, vector spaces and subspaces, the nullspace, projection and subspaces, matrix factorization, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, matrix diagonalization, singular value decomposition (SVD), functions of matrices, matrix polynomials and Cayley-Hamilton theorem, state-space modeling, optimization techniques, least squares technique, total least squares, and numerical techniques. Electrical engineering applications will be discussed throughout the course.
3
EEEE-790
MS Thesis
An independent engineering project or research problem to demonstrate professional maturity. A formal written thesis and an oral defense are required. The student must obtain the approval of an appropriate faculty member to guide the thesis before registering for the thesis. A thesis may be used to earn a maximum of 6 credits.
6
 
Free Elective
3
 
Professional Electives
9
 
Graduate Electives
9
 
LAS Immersion 3
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
150

Please see General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Electrical engineering, BS degree/Science, technology and public policy, MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MATH-181
Project-based Calculus I
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals.
4
MATH-182
Project-based Calculus II
This is the second in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates.
4
CHMG-131
General Chemistry of Engineers
This rigorous course is primarily for, but not limited to, engineering students. Topics include an introduction to some basic concepts in chemistry, stoichiometry, First Law of Thermodynamics, thermochemistry, electronic theory of composition and structure, and chemical bonding. The lecture is supported by workshop-style problem sessions. Offered in traditional and online format.
3
PHYS-211
University Physics I
This is a course in calculus-based physics for science and engineering majors. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton's Laws, gravitation, work and energy, momentum and impulse, conservation laws, systems of particles, rotational motion, static equilibrium, mechanical oscillations and waves, and data presentation/analysis. The course is taught in a workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses.
4
EEEE-120
Digital Systems I
This course introduces the student to the basic components and methodologies used in digital systems design. It is usually the student's first exposure to engineering design. The laboratory component consists of small design, implement, and debug projects. The complexity of these projects increases steadily throughout the quarter, starting with circuits of a few gates, until small systems containing several tens of gates and memory elements. Topics include: Boolean algebra, synthesis and analysis of combinational logic circuits, arithmetic circuits, memory elements, synthesis and analysis of sequential logic circuits, finite state machines, and data transfers.
3
ENGL-150
First Year Writing 
This First Year Writing Intensive course is designed to develop first-year students’ proficiency in analytical writing, rhetorical reading, and critical thinking by focusing on particular uses of narrative. Students will read, understand, and interpret a variety of texts representing different cultural perspectives and/or academic disciplines. Increasingly, scholars, artists, public figures and other professionals recognize the value of using stories across genres to inform analytical practice. Students will gain informed practice in using narrative in different disciplines, and become aware of storytelling as one among a number of rhetorical strategies for inquiry. Students will be expected to give presentations as well as write papers both in response to the reading material and in services of their own independent arguments.
3
EEEE-105
Freshman Practicum
Introduction to the practice of electrical engineering including understanding laboratory practice, identifying electronic components, operating generic electronic instruments, building an electronic circuit (Wein Bridge oscillator), measuring and capturing an electronic waveform, schematic entry, modeling, and simulation of an electronic circuit (SPICE or equivalent), analyzing a waveform using a commercial software package (MATLAB), and building and studying an amplitude modulation radio receiver. This studio style lab course emphasizes a learn-by-doing approach to introduce the student to electrical engineering design practices and tools used throughout the undergraduate program and professional career. Each student will prototype and build a functioning electronic circuit.
1
ACSC-010
Year One
The Year One class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, personal success, leadership development, social responsibility and life academic skills awareness and application. Year One is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build relationships and help them become an integral part of the campus community.
0
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
 
First Year LAS Elective
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
MATH-221
Multivariable and Vector Calculus
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes a study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, Stokes' Theorem, Green's Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-219.
4
PHYS-212
University Physics II
This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses.
4
CMPR-271
Computational Problem Solving for Engineers
This course introduces computational problem solving. Basic problem-solving techniques and algorithm development through the process of top-down stepwise refinement and functional decomposition are introduced throughout the course. Classical numerical problems encountered in science and engineering are used to demonstrate the development of algorithms and their implementations. May not be taken for credit by Computer Science, Software Engineering, or Computer Engineering majors. This course is designed for Electrical Engineering and Micro-Electronic Engineering majors and students interested in the Electrical Engineering minor.
3
EEEE-281
Circuits I
Covers basics of DC circuit analysis starting with the definition of voltage, current, resistance, power and energy. Linearity and superposition, together with Kirchhoff's laws, are applied to analysis of circuits having series, parallel and other combinations of circuit elements. Thevenin, Norton and maximum power transfer theorems are proved and applied. Circuits with ideal op-amps are introduced. Inductance and capacitance are introduced and the transient response of RL, RC and RLC circuits to step inputs is established. Practical aspects of the properties of passive devices and batteries are discussed, as are the characteristics of battery-powered circuitry. The laboratory component incorporates use of both computer and manually controlled instrumentation including power supplies, signal generators and oscilloscopes to reinforce concepts discussed in class as well as circuit design and simulation software.
3
EEEE-282
Circuits II
This course covers the fundamentals of AC circuit analysis starting with the study of sinusoidal steady-state solutions for circuits in the time domain. The complex plane is introduced along with the concepts of complex exponential functions, phasors, impedances and admittances. Nodal, loop and mesh methods of analysis as well as Thevenin and related theorems are applied to the complex plane. The concept of complex power is developed. The analysis of mutual induction as applied to coupled-coils. Linear, ideal and non-ideal transformers are introduced. Complex frequency analysis is introduced to enable discussion of transfer functions, frequency dependent behavior, Bode plots, resonance phenomenon and simple filter circuits. Two-port network theory is developed and applied to circuits and interconnections.
3
MATH-231
Differential Equations
This course is an introduction to the study of ordinary differential equations and their applications. Topics include solutions to first order equations and linear second order equations, method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, linear independence and the Wronskian, vibrating systems, and Laplace transforms.
3
EEEE-260
Semiconductor Devices
An introductory course on the fundamentals of semiconductor physics and principles of operation of basic devices. Topics include semiconductor fundamentals (crystal structure, statistical physics of carrier concentration, motion in crystals, energy band models, drift and diffusion currents) as well as the operation of pn junction diodes, bipolar junction transistors (BJT), metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors and MOS field-effect transistors.
3
EEEE-220
Digital Systems II
In the first part, the course covers the design of digital systems using a hardware description language. In the second part, it covers the design of large digital systems using the computer design methodology, and culminates with the design of a reduced instruction set central processing unit, associated memory and input/output peripherals. The course focuses on the design, capture, simulation, and verification of major hardware components such as: the datapath, the control unit, the central processing unit, the system memory, and the I/O modules. The lab sessions enforce and complement the concepts and design principles exposed in the lecture through the use of CAD tools and emulation in a commercial FPGA. This course assumes a background in C programming.
3
 
Restricted Elective
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
 
Third Year
MATH-381
Complex Variables
This course covers the algebra of complex numbers, analytic functions, Cauchy-Riemann equations, complex integration, Cauchy's integral theorem and integral formulas, Taylor and Laurent series, residues, and the calculation of real-valued integrals by complex-variable methods.
3
EEEE-374
EM Fields and Transmission Lines
The course provides the foundations of EM fields, static and time varying, and a study of propagation, reflection and transmissions of electromagnetic waves in unbounded regions and in transmission lines. Topics include the following: electric field intensity and potential, Guass' Law, polarization, electric flux density, dielectric constant and boundary conditions, Poisson's and Laplace's equations, methods of images, steady electric current and conduction current density, vector magnetic potential, Biot-Savart law, magnetization, magnetic field intensity, permeability, boundary conditions, Faraday's law, Maxwell's equations and the continuity equation. Time harmonic EM fields, wave equations, uniform plane waves, polarization, Poynting theorem and power, reflection and transmission from multiple dielectric interfaces, transmission line equations, transients on transmission lines, pulse and step excitations, reflection diagrams, sinusoidal steady state solutions, standing waves, the Smith Chart and impedance matching techniques, TE and TM waves in rectangular waveguides. experiments using state-of-art RF equipment illustrating fundamental wave propagation and reflection concepts, design projects with state-of-art EM modeling tools.
4
EEEE-353
Linear Systems
Linear Systems provides the foundations of continuous and discrete signal and system analysis and modeling. Topics include a description of continuous linear systems via differential equations, a description of discrete systems via difference equations, input-output relationship of continuous and discrete linear systems, the continuous time convolution integral, the discrete time convolution sum, application of convolution principles to system response calculations, exponential and trigonometric forms of Fourier series and their properties, Fourier transforms including energy spectrum and energy spectral density. Sampling of continuous time signals and the sampling theorem, the Laplace, Z and DTFT. The solution of differential equations and circuit analysis problems using Laplace transforms, transfer functions of physical systems, block diagram algebra and transfer function realization is also covered. A comprehensive study of the z transform and its inverse, which includes system transfer function concepts, system frequency response and its interpretation, and the relationship of the z transform to the Fourier and Laplace transform is also covered. Finally, an introduction to the design of digital filters, which includes filter block diagrams for Finite Impulse Response (FIR) and Infinite Impulse Response (IIR) filters is introduced.
4
EEEE-380
Digital Electronics
This is an introductory course in digital MOS circuit analysis and design. The course covers the following topics: (1) MOSFET I-V behavior in aggressively scaled devices; (2) Static and dynamic characteristics of NMOS and CMOS inverters; (3) Combinational and sequential logic networks using CMOS technology; (4) Dynamic CMOS logic networks, including precharge-evaluate, domino and transmission gate circuits; (5) Special topics, including static and dynamic MOS memory, and interconnect RLC behavior.
3
 
Free Elective (fall)
3
 
Cooperative Education (summer/spring)
co-op
Fourth Year
EEEE-420
Embedded Systems Design
The purpose of this course is to expose students to both the hardware and the software components of a digital embedded system. It focuses on the boundary between hardware and software operations. Students will learn about a computer system from various abstraction levels from the digital logic gates to software applications. This course will also provide a solid foundation in computer systems architecture. The course focuses on the major hardware components such as: datapaths, the control unit, the central processing unit, the system memory, the I/O modules and on instruction set architectures. The lab sessions will cover the design, simulation and implementation of a 4-bit microprocessor core.
3
EEEE-414
Classical Control
This course introduces students to the study of linear continuous-time classical control systems, their behavior, design, and use in augmenting engineering system performance. The course is based on classical control methods using Laplace-transforms, block-diagrams, root-locus, and frequency-domain analysis. Topics include: Laplace-transform review; Bode plot review; system modeling for control; relationships of transfer-function poles and zeros to time-response behaviors; stability analysis; steady-state error, error constants, and error specification; feedback control properties; relationships between stability margins and transient behavior; lead, lag, and PID control; root-locus analysis and design; frequency-response design and Nyquist stability. A laboratory will provide students with hands-on analysis and design-build-test experience, and includes the use of computer-aided design software such as MATLAB.
3
EEEE-480
Analog Electronics
This is an introductory course in analog electronic circuit analysis and design. The course covers the following topics: (1) Diode circuit DC and small-signal behavior, including rectifying as well as Zener-diode-based voltage regulation; (2) MOSFET current-voltage characteristics; (3) DC biasing of MOSFET circuits, including integrated-circuit current sources; (4) Small-signal analysis of single-transistor MOSFET amplifiers and differential amplifiers; (5) Multi-stage MOSFET amplifiers, such as cascade amplifiers, and operational amplifiers; (6) Frequency response of MOSFET-based single- and multi-stage amplifiers; (7) DC and small-signal analysis and design of bipolar junction transistor (BJT) devices and circuits; (8) Feedback and stability in MOSFET and BJT amplifiers.
4
MATH-251
Probability and Statistics I
This course introduces sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability and independence, distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions (discrete and continuous), the central limit theorem, descriptive statistics, interval estimation, and applications of probability and statistics to real-world problems. A statistical package such as Minitab or R is used for data analysis and statistical applications.
3
PUBL-701
Graduate Policy Analysis
This course provides graduate students with necessary tools to help them become effective policy analysts. The course places particular emphasis on understanding the policy process, the different approaches to policy analysis, and the application of quantitative and qualitative methods for evaluating public policies. Students will apply these tools to contemporary public policy decision making at the local, state, federal, and international levels.
3
PUBL-702
Graduate Decision Analysis
This course provides students with an introduction to decision science and analysis. The course focuses on several important tools for making good decisions, including decision trees, including forecasting, risk analysis, and multi-attribute decision making. Students will apply these tools to contemporary public policy decision making at the local, state, federal, and international levels.
3
 
Professional Elective
6
 
LAS Immersion 1, 2
6
 
Free Elective
3
 
Cooperative Education (summer)
Co-op
Fifth Year
EEEE-484
Communication Systems (WI)
Introduction to Communication Systems provides the basics of the formation, transmission and reception of information over communication channels. Spectral density and correlation descriptions for deterministic and stationary random signals. Amplitude and angle modulation methods (e.g. AM and FM) for continuous signals. Carrier detection and synchronization. Phase-locked loop and its application. Introduction to digital communication. Binary ASK, FSK and PSK. Noise effects. Optimum detection: matched filters, maximum-likelihood reception. Computer simulation.
3
EEEE-497
Senior Design I
MSD-I is the first half of a two-semester design course oriented to the solution of engineering problems. The mission is to enhance engineering education through a capstone design experience that integrates engineering theory, principles and processes within a collaborative environment. Working in multidisciplinary teams and following an engineering design process, students will assess customer needs and engineering specifications, evaluate concepts, resolve major technical hurdles, and employ rigorous engineering principles to design a prototype which is fully tested and documented.
3
EEEE-498
Senior Design II
MSD-II is the second half of a two-semester design course oriented to the solution of engineering problems. The mission is to enhance engineering education through a capstone design experience that integrates engineering theory, principles and processes within a collaborative environment. Working in multidisciplinary teams and following an engineering design process, students will assess customer needs and engineering specifications, evaluate concepts, resolve major technical hurdles, and employ rigorous engineering principles to design a prototype which is fully tested and documented.
3
EEEE-483
Mechatronics
Fundamental principles of electric machines are covered. Sensors and actuators are studied. The primary actuators discussed are high-performance electromechanical motion devices such as permanent-magnet DC, synchronous and stepper motors. Topics in power electronics and control of electromechanical systems are studied. High-performance MATLAB environment is used to simulate, analyze and control mechatronic systems. Application of digital signal processors and microcontrollers in mechatronics are introduced. Case studies are covered.
3
PUBL-700
Readings in Public Policy
An in-depth inquiry into key contemporary public policy issues. Students will be exposed to a wide range of important public policy texts, and will learn how to write a literature review in a policy area of their choosing.
3
STSO-710
Science and Technology Policy Seminar
Examines how federal and international policies are developed to influence research and development, innovation, and the transfer of technology in the United States and other selected nations. Students in the course will apply basic policy skills, concepts, and methods to contemporary science and technology policy topics.
3
PUBL-703
Evaluation and Research Design
The focus of this course is on evaluation of program outcomes and research design. Students will explore the questions and methodologies associated with meeting programmatic outcomes, secondary or unanticipated effects, and an analysis of alternative means for achieving program outcomes. Critique of evaluation research methodologies will also be considered.
3
 
LAS Immersion 3
3
 
Public Policy Elective
3
 
Graduate Professional Elective/Public Policy Elective
3
Choose one of the following:
6
 
   Thesis Research
 
 
   Comprehensive Exam, Graduate Electives
 
Total Semester Credit Hours
150

Please see General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Admission Requirements

Freshman Admission

For all bachelor’s degree programs, a strong performance in a college preparatory program is expected. Generally, this includes 4 years of English, 3-4 years of mathematics, 2-3 years of science, and 3 years of social studies and/or history.

Specific math and science requirements and other recommendations

  • 4 years of math required; including pre-calculus or above  
  • Chemistry and physics required

Transfer Admission

Transfer course recommendations without associate degree

Pre-engineering courses such as calculus, calculus-based physics, chemistry, and liberal arts.

Appropriate associate degree programs for transfer

AS degree in engineering science

Learn about admissions and financial aid