Industrial Engineering Bachelor of Science Degree

An industrial engineering degree that provides you with the skills to optimize, design, and manage the operational and manufacturing processes by which goods are made and distributed, and services are provided efficiently.


94%

Outcome Rate of RIT Graduates from this degree

$75.7K

Average First-Year Salary of RIT Graduates from this degree


Overview for Industrial Engineering BS

  • Four required blocks of co-op mean nearly a year of hands-on, full-time paid work experience in industry.
  • Companies hiring our students for co-ops include Addison Precision Manufacturing, Bendix, GE Aviation, General Motors, GlobalFoundries, Intel, L3Harris, Penske Truck Leasing, Precision Castparts Corp., Tesla, U.S. Postal Service, Volvo, The Walt Disney Company, and Wegmans, to name a few.

The industrial engineering degree is for students interested in optimizing, designing, and managing the processes by which goods are made and distributed, and services are efficiently provided. Industrial engineering also ensures that high-quality products and services are delivered in a cost-effective manner. Industrial engineers aid companies globally, balancing sustainable design with skillful construction of systems. Graduates of the industrial engineering degree are able to address big-picture design and engineering questions, such as how engineers can simultaneously increase efficiency and quality.

What is Industrial Engineering?

Industrial engineers design, optimize, and manage the process by which products are made and distributed across the world (i.e., global supply chain), or the way services are delivered in industries such as banking, health care, energy, or entertainment. Industrial engineers ensure that high-quality products and services are delivered in a cost-effective manner.

Industrial engineering is ideal for those who enjoy both technology and working with people. Industrial engineers frequently spend as much time interacting with other engineers and product users as they do at their desks and computers. Typical work involves developing applied models and simulations of processes to evaluate overall system efficiency.

A degree in industrial engineering offers students a significant opportunity for a flexible long-term career. Employers have consistently praised the quality of RIT’s industrial engineering graduates, noting that the range of their abilities includes both strong technical knowledge and communication skills. Graduates have used their technical base as a springboard to careers in management, consulting, manufacturing, sales, health care, law, and education.

As described by the Institute of Industrial and Systems Engineers on the organization's website:

"Industrial engineering is about choices. Other engineering disciplines apply skills to very specific areas. IE gives practitioners the opportunity to work in a variety of businesses.

Many practitioners say that industrial engineering education offers the best of both worlds: an education in both engineering and business.

The most distinctive aspect of industrial engineering is the flexibility it offers. Whether it’s shortening a roller coaster line, streamlining an operating room, distributing products worldwide, or manufacturing superior automobiles, these challenges share the common goal of saving companies money and increasing efficiencies.

As companies adopt management philosophies of continuous productivity and quality improvement to survive in the increasingly competitive world market, the need for industrial engineers is growing. Why? Industrial engineers are the only engineering professionals trained specifically to be productivity and quality improvement specialists.

Industrial engineers figure out how to do things better. They engineer processes and systems that improve quality and productivity. They work to eliminate waste of time, money, materials, energy and other commodities. This is why many industrial engineers end up being promoted into management positions.

Many people are misled by the term industrial engineer. It’s not just about manufacturing. It also encompasses service industries, with many IEs employed in entertainment industries, shipping and logistics businesses, and health care organizations."

Industrial engineers are "big-picture" thinkers, much like systems integrators. IEs spend most of their time out in the work environment, using scientific approaches to solve today's problems while they develop solutions for the future.

Industrial Engineering Curriculum

Because of the flexible nature of the industrial engineering degree, students gain a breadth of knowledge in many different areas of industrial engineering, including advanced manufacturing, distribution/logistics, ergonomics/human factors, modeling/simulation, and sustainable design and development. Students may choose free and professional electives for this purpose.

The curriculum for the BS in industrial engineering covers the principal concepts of engineering economics and project management, facilities planning, human performance, mathematical and simulation modeling, production control, applied statistics and quality, and contemporary manufacturing production processes that are applied to solve the challenges presented by the global environment and economy of today. Courses in industrial engineering stress the application of contemporary tools and techniques in solving engineering problems. Learn more about Student Learning Outcomes and Program Educational Objectives for the industrial engineering BS degree.

Industrial Engineering Careers

In order to optimize processes and systems, industrial engineers apply their knowledge in a wide range of areas, including systems simulation modeling, quality, logistics and supply chain management, ergonomics and human factors, facilities layout, production planning and control, manufacturing, management information systems, and project management. Upon graduation, our students work for a wide array of fields (ranging from manufacturing and distribution/logistics to health care, energy and other services) and companies (including Boeing, IBM, Toyota, Xerox, Intel, General Electric, Hershey, Walt Disney World, Tesla, Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical, Lockheed Martin, and Wegmans Food Markets, to name a few.)

Balance, as well as specialization, has allowed our graduates to pursue varied paths. Examples of the diversity, along with the roles in which an industrial engineer might function, are reflected in the following list of sample industrial engineering co-op assignments.

In manufacturing industries:

  • Perform product life studies
  • Lay out and improve work areas
  • Design production processes to improve productivity
  • Investigate and analyze the cost of purchasing new vs. repairing existing equipment
  • Investigate delivery service, including scheduling, route modification, and material handling
  • Create computer programs to track pricing policies and truck scheduling
  • Perform downtime studies of various operations using time study and work sampling
  • Develop and computerize a forecasting model
  • Perform ergonomic studies and evaluations of workstations and product designs
  • Participate in the design process of products and processes to ensure ease of manufacture, maintenance, and remanufacture or recycling

In service industries:

  • Design information systems
  • Monitor safety and health programs
  • Manage hazardous and toxic materials storage and disposal programs
  • Manage a facility's projects to ensure they are completed on time and on budget
  • Conduct cost analysis of procedures to support decision making
  • Schedule operations and manage information flow
  • Design supply-ordering systems
  • Improve processes in a hospital
  • Evaluate waiting time and space utilization in an amusement park

Engineering vs. Engineering Technology

Two dynamic areas of study, both with outstanding outcomes rates. Which do you choose?

What’s the difference between engineering and engineering technology? It’s a question we’re asked all the time. While there are subtle differences in the course work between the two, choosing a major in engineering vs. engineering technology is more about identifying what you like to do and how you like to do it.

Combined Accelerated Bachelor’s/Master’s Degrees

Today’s careers require advanced degrees grounded in real-world experience. RIT’s Combined Accelerated Bachelor’s/Master’s Degrees enable you to earn both a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in as little as five years of study, all while gaining the valuable hands-on experience that comes from co-ops, internships, research, study abroad, and more.

+1 MBA: Students who enroll in a qualifying undergraduate degree have the opportunity to add an MBA to their bachelor’s degree after their first year of study, depending on their program. Learn how the +1 MBA can accelerate your learning and position you for success.

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Careers and Cooperative Education

Typical Job Titles

Industrial Engineer Sustainability Engineer
Human Factors Engineer Logistics Planner
Operations Manager Manufacturing Engineer
Quality Engineer Project Manager
Systems Manager

Industries

  • Aerospace
  • Automotive
  • Electronic and Computer Hardware
  • Manufacturing
  • Medical Devices
  • Transportation and Logistics
  • Utilities and Renewable Energy

Salary and Career Information for Industrial Engineering BS

Cooperative Education

What’s different about an RIT education? It’s the career experience you gain by completing cooperative education and internships with top companies in every single industry. You’ll earn more than a degree. You’ll gain real-world career experience that sets you apart. It’s exposure–early and often–to a variety of professional work environments, career paths, and industries.

Co-ops and internships take your knowledge and turn it into know-how. Your engineering co-ops will provide hands-on experience that enables you to apply your engineering knowledge in professional settings while you make valuable connections between classwork and real-world applications.

Students in the industrial engineering degree are required to complete four blocks (48 weeks) of cooperative education experience.

Curriculum for 2023-2024 for Industrial Engineering BS

Current Students: See Curriculum Requirements

Industrial Engineering, BS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CHMG-131
General Chemistry for Engineers (General Education)
This rigorous course is primarily for, but not limited to, engineering students. Topics include an introduction to some basic concepts in chemistry, stoichiometry, First Law of Thermodynamics, thermochemistry, electronic theory of composition and structure, and chemical bonding. The lecture is supported by workshop-style problem sessions. Offered in traditional and online format. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-120
Fundamentals of Industrial Engineering
This course introduces students to industrial engineering and provides students with foundational tools used in the profession. The course is intended to prepare students for their first co-op experience in industrial engineering by exposing them to tools and concepts that are often encountered during early co-op assignments. The course covers specific tools and their applications, including systems design and the integration. The course uses a combination of lecture and laboratory activities. Projects and group exercises will be used to cover hands-on applications and problem-solving related to topics covered in lectures. (This class is restricted to ISEE-BS, ENGRX-UND, or ISEEDU Major students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-140
Materials Processing
A study of the application of machine tools and fabrication processes to engineering materials in the manufacture of products. Processes covered include cutting, molding, casting, forming, powder metallurgy, solid modeling, engineering drawing, and welding. Students make a project in the lab portion of the course. (This class is restricted to ISEE-BS, ENGRX-UND, or ISEEDU Major students.) Lab 1, Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MATH-181
Calculus I (General Education – Mathematical Perspective A)
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals. (Prerequisites: MATH-111 or (NMTH-220 and NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275) or equivalent courses with a minimum grade of B-, or a score of at least 60% on the RIT Mathematics Placement Exam. Co-requisites: MATH-181R or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
MATH-182
Calculus II (General Education – Mathematical Perspective B)
This is the second in a two-course sequence. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or MATH-181A or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
PHYS-211
University Physics I (General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective)
This is a course in calculus-based physics for science and engineering majors. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton's Laws, gravitation, work and energy, momentum and impulse, conservation laws, systems of particles, rotational motion, static equilibrium, mechanical oscillations and waves, and data presentation/analysis. The course is taught in a workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: MATH-182 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
YOPS-010
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. (This class is restricted to incoming 1st year or global campus students.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
First-Year Writing (WI) (General Education)
3
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education – Elective
3
Second Year
EGEN-99
Engineering Co-op Preparation
This course will prepare students, who are entering their second year of study, for both the job search and employment in the field of engineering. Students will learn strategies for conducting a successful job search, including the preparation of resumes and cover letters; behavioral interviewing techniques and effective use of social media in the application process. Professional and ethical responsibilities during the job search and for co-op and subsequent professional experiences will be discussed. (This course is restricted to students in Kate Gleason College of Engineering with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
ISEE-200
Computing for Engineers (General Education)
This course aims to help undergraduate students in understanding the latest software engineering techniques and their applications in the context of industrial and systems engineering. The topics of this course include the fundamental concepts and applications of computer programming, software engineering, computational problem solving, and statistical techniques for data mining and analytics. (This class is restricted to ISEE-BS, ENGRX-UND, or ISEEDU Major students.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ISEE-325
Engineering Statistics and Design of Experiments
This course covers statistics for use in engineering as well as the primary concepts of experimental design. The first portion of the course will cover: Point estimation; hypothesis testing and confidence intervals; one- and two-sample inference. The remainder of the class will be spent on concepts of design and analysis of experiments. Lectures and assignments will incorporate real-world science and engineering examples, including studies found in the literature. (Prerequisites: STAT-251 or MATH-251 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-345
Engineering Economy
Time value of money, methods of comparing alternatives, depreciation and depletion, income tax consideration and capital budgeting. Cannot be used as a professional elective for ISE majors. Course provides a foundation for engineers to effectively analyze engineering projects with respect to financial considerations. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
MATH-221
Multivariable and Vector Calculus (General Education)
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes a study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, Stokes' Theorem, Green's Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-219. (Prerequisite: C- or better MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
4
MATH-233
Linear Systems and Differential Equations (General Education)
This is an introductory course in linear algebra and ordinary differential equations in which a scientific computing package is used to clarify mathematical concepts, visualize problems, and work with large systems. The course covers matrix algebra, the basic notions and techniques of ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients, and the physical situation in which they arise. (Prerequisites: MATH-172 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A and students in CHEM-BS or CHEM-BS/MS or ISEE-BS programs.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
4
MATH-251
Probability and Statistics (General Education)
This course introduces sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability and independence, distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions (discrete and continuous), the central limit theorem, descriptive statistics, interval estimation, and applications of probability and statistics to real-world problems. A statistical package such as Minitab or R is used for data analysis and statistical applications. (Prerequisites: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH 182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
MECE-200
Fundamentals of Mechanics
Statics: equilibrium, the principle of transmissibility of forces, couples, centroids, trusses and friction. Introduction to strength of materials: axial stresses and strains, statically indeterminate problems, torsion and bending. Dynamics: dynamics of particles and rigid bodies with an introduction to kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies, work, energy, impulse momentum and mechanical vibrations. Emphasis is on problem solving. For students majoring in industrial and systems engineering. (Prerequisites: PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or 1017-312 or 1017-312T or 1017-389 or PHYS-206 and PHYS-207 or equivalent course.and restricted to students in ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS programs.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
4
PHYS-212
University Physics II (General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective)
This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: (PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or PHYS-216) or (MECE-102, MECE-103 and MECE-205) and (MATH-182 or MATH-172 or MATH-182A) or equivalent courses. Grades of C- or better are required in all prerequisite courses.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
Third Year
ISEE-301
Operations Research
An introduction to optimization through mathematical programming and stochastic modeling techniques. Course topics include linear programming, transportation and assignment algorithms, Markov Chain queuing and their application on problems in manufacturing, health care, financial systems, supply chain, and other engineering disciplines. Special attention is placed on sensitivity analysis and the need of optimization in decision-making. The course is delivered through lectures and a weekly laboratory where students learn to use state-of-the-art software packages for modeling large discrete optimization problems. (Prerequisites: MATH-233 or (MATH-231 and MATH-241) or equivalent course.) Lab 2, Lecture 3 (Spring).
4
ISEE-304
Fundamentals of Materials Science
This course provides the student with an overview of structure, properties, and processing of metals, polymers, ceramics and composites. There is a particular emphasis on understanding of materials and the relative impact on manufacturing optimization throughput and quality as it relates to Industrial Engineering. This course is delivered through lectures and a weekly laboratory. (This course is restricted to ISEE-BS Major students.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Spring).
3
ISEE-323
Systems and Facilities Planning
A basic course in quantitative models on layout, material handling, and warehousing. Topics include product/process analysis, flow of materials, material handling systems, warehousing and layout design. A computer-aided layout design package is used. (Corequisites: ISEE-301 or equivalent course.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Spring).
3
ISEE-330
Ergonomics and Human Factors (WI-PR)
This course covers the physical and cognitive aspects of human performance to enable students to design work places, procedures, products and processes that are consistent with human capabilities and limitations. Principles of physical work and human anthropometry are studied to enable the student to systematically design work places, processes, and systems that are consistent with human capabilities and limitations. In addition, the human information processing capabilities are studied, which includes the human sensory, memory, attention and cognitive processes; display and control design principles; as well as human computer interface design. (Co-requisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
4
ISEE-350
Engineering Management
Development of the fundamental engineering management principles of industrial enterprise, including an introduction to project management. Emphasis is on project management and the development of the project management plan. At least one term of previous co-op experience is required. (Prerequisite: BIME-499 or MECE-499 or ISEE-499 or CHME-499 or EEEE-499 or CMPE-499 or MCEE-499 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ISEE-499
Co-op (fall and summer)
One semester of paid work experience in industrial engineering. (Prerequisites: ISEE-120 and EGEN-99 and students in the ISEE-BS program.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
Fourth Year
ISEE-420
Production Planning/Scheduling
A first course in mathematical modeling of production-inventory systems. Topics included: Inventory: Deterministic Models, Inventory: Stochastic Models, Push v. Pull Production Control Systems, Factory Physics, and Operations Scheduling. Modern aspects such as lean manufacturing are included in the context of the course. (Prerequisites: ISEE-301 and (STAT-251 or MATH-251) or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ISEE-499
Co-op (spring and summer)
One semester of paid work experience in industrial engineering. (Prerequisites: ISEE-120 and EGEN-99 and students in the ISEE-BS program.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
ISEE-510
Systems Simulation
Computer-based simulation of dynamic and stochastic systems. Simulation modeling and analysis methods are the focus of this course. A high-level simulation language such as Simio, ARENA, etc., will be used to model systems and examine system performance. Model validation, design of simulation experiments, and random number generation will be introduced. (Prerequisites: ISEE-200 and ISEE-301 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-560
Applied Statistical Quality Control
An applied approach to statistical quality control utilizing theoretical tools acquired in other math and statistics courses. Heavy emphasis on understanding and applying statistical analysis methods in real-world quality control situations in engineering. Topics include process capability analysis, acceptance sampling, hypothesis testing and control charts. Contemporary topics such as six-sigma are included within the context of the course. (Prerequisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course and students in ISEE-BS or ISEE-MN or ENGMGT-MN programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
 
Professional Elective
3
 
General Education – Immersion
3
Fifth Year
ISEE-497
Multidisciplinary Senior Design I
This is the first in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. This first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. The second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: ISEE-323 and ISEE-330 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: ISEE-350 and ISEE-420 and ISEE-510 and ISEE-560 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
ISEE-498
Multidisciplinary Senior Design II (WI-PR)
This is the second in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. The first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. This second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: ISEE-497 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-561
Linear Regression Analysis
In any system where parameters of interest change, it may be of interest to examine the effects that some variables exert (or appear to exert) on others. "Regression analysis" actually describes a variety of data analysis techniques that can be used to describe the interrelationships among such variables. In this course we will examine in detail the use of one popular analytic technique: least squares linear regression. Cases illustrating the use of regression techniques in engineering applications will be developed and analyzed throughout the course. (Prerequisites: (MATH-233 or (MATH-231 and MATH-241)) and (ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252) or equivalent courses and students in ISEE-BS programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
 
Professional Electives
6
 
Open Electives
9
 
General Education – Immersion 2, 3
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
129

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI-PR) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Professional Options

Students who elect to pursue a Professional Option may use any combination of Open and Professional Electives to complete one of the options listed below:

Ergonomics/Human Factors

Electives
ISEE-730
 Biomechanics of Human Movement 
Topics include musculoskeletal anatomy and mechanics, theory and application of electromyography, motion and force measuring equipment and techniques, human locomotion, balance and falls, inverse dynamics modeling of the human body, and current topics in musculoskeletal biomechanics research. Students collect data in the lab and conduct the data analysis using MATLAB software or Python software. (Prerequisites: ISEE-330 or MECE-320 or BIME-200 or equivalent course or students in ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, ENGMGT-ME, MECE-MS, MECE-ME, or MIE-PHD programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
ISEE-731
 Advanced Topics in Human Factors and Ergonomics
Advanced topics are selected based on current ergonomic and human factors issues and interests of students. Course is taught using a seminar format. Students are required to select, read, and discuss scientific literature relevant to the fields of human factors and ergonomics. (Prerequisites: ISEE-330 or equivalent course or students in ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, ENGMGT-ME, or MIE-PHD programs.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
ISEE-732
 Systems Safety Engineering 
Acquaints students with practical aspects of safety engineering. Students acquire a working knowledge of legal and technical aspects of safety. Focuses on a systems approach to safety engineering. Topics include Workers Compensation, OSHA, Consumer Product Safety Commission, NIOSH Guidelines and various hazard analysis and utilization techniques. Students also are exposed to various theories of accident causation, research methodology and ways of evaluating safety programs and related research. (This course is restricted to students in the ISEE-BS/MS, ISEE-BS/ME, ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, ENGMGT-ME, or MIE-PHD programs or those with 4th year standing in ISEE-BS.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
ISEE-734
 Graduate Engineering Psychology
In this course the students will learn to recognize the integrated (systems) nature of Engineering Psychology, the centrality of human beings in systems design, and to use the topics covered and the available knowledge base to adapt the environment to people. This course will cover several fundamental models of human information processing in the context of human-system interactions. The models may include but are not limited to Signal Detection Theory, Information Theory, theories of attention, both normative and naturalistic decision making-models, Control Theory, and the Lens Model of Brunswick, as well as models of the human as a physical engine, that is, anthropometry, biomechanics, and work physiology. Most topics include readings in addition to the course text as well as a lab exercise with a detailed lab report. (This course is restricted to students in the ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS or ENGMGT-ME programs or those with 5th year standing in ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS.) Lecture 3 .
ISEE-760
 Design of Experiments
This course presents an in-depth study of the primary concepts of experimental design. Its applied approach uses theoretical tools acquired in other mathematics and statistics courses. Emphasis is placed on the role of replication and randomization in experimentation. Numerous designs and design strategies are reviewed and implications on data analysis are discussed. Topics include: consideration of type 1 and type 2 errors in experimentation, sample size determination, completely randomized designs, randomized complete block designs, blocking and confounding in experiments, Latin square and Graeco Latin square designs, general factorial designs, the 2k factorial design system, the 3k factorial design system, fractional factorial designs, Taguchi experimentation. (Prerequisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course or students in ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, ENGMGT-ME, or MIE-PHD programs.) Lecture 3 (Spring).

Lean Six Sigma

Electives
ISEE-582
Lean Six Sigma Fundamentals
This course presents the philosophy and methods that enable participants to develop quality strategies and drive process improvements. The fundamental elements of Lean Six Sigma are covered along with many problem solving and statistical tools that are valuable in driving process improvements in a broad range of business environments and industries. Successful completion of this course is accompanied by “yellow belt” certification and provides a solid foundation for those who also wish to pursue a “green belt.” (Green belt certification requires completion of an approved project which is beyond the scope of this course). (Prerequisites: STAT-145 or STAT-251 or MATH-251 or CHME-391 or equivalent course and and at least 4th year standing.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
ISEE-626
Contemporary Production Systems
The focus of this course is Lean. Lean is about doing more with less - less human effort, less equipment, less time, less space. In other words, lean is about the application of industrial engineering principles and tools to the entire supply chain or value stream. The focus of this course will be learning and applying the principles and tools of lean such as value, value stream mapping, takt, flow, pull, kaizen, standard work, line design, and others, all in the context of continuous process improvement. By the end of this course, the student will possess the essential tools and skills to apply lean in their production system from either a line (supervisor or manager) or staff role. (This course is restricted to students in the ISEE-BS/MS, ISEE-BS/ME, ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, ENGMGT-ME, or MIE-PHD programs or those with 5th year standing in ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
ISEE-728
Production Systems Management
The focus of this course is Lean. Students who take this course should be interested in building on their basic knowledge of (lean) contemporary production systems and developing the breadth and depth of their understanding, with a focus on the managerial, quantitative, and systems aspects. It will also address value streams beyond manufacturing - specifically logistics. This course should enable the student to practice the application of lean concepts in the context of systems design at the enterprise level. (Prerequisites: ISEE-420 or ISEE-626 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
ISEE-760
Design of Experiments
This course presents an in-depth study of the primary concepts of experimental design. Its applied approach uses theoretical tools acquired in other mathematics and statistics courses. Emphasis is placed on the role of replication and randomization in experimentation. Numerous designs and design strategies are reviewed and implications on data analysis are discussed. Topics include: consideration of type 1 and type 2 errors in experimentation, sample size determination, completely randomized designs, randomized complete block designs, blocking and confounding in experiments, Latin square and Graeco Latin square designs, general factorial designs, the 2k factorial design system, the 3k factorial design system, fractional factorial designs, Taguchi experimentation. (Prerequisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course or students in ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, ENGMGT-ME, or MIE-PHD programs.) Lecture 3 (Spring).

Manufacturing

Electives
ISEE-626
Contemporary Production Systems
The focus of this course is Lean. Lean is about doing more with less - less human effort, less equipment, less time, less space. In other words, lean is about the application of industrial engineering principles and tools to the entire supply chain or value stream. The focus of this course will be learning and applying the principles and tools of lean such as value, value stream mapping, takt, flow, pull, kaizen, standard work, line design, and others, all in the context of continuous process improvement. By the end of this course, the student will possess the essential tools and skills to apply lean in their production system from either a line (supervisor or manager) or staff role. (This course is restricted to students in the ISEE-BS/MS, ISEE-BS/ME, ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, ENGMGT-ME, or MIE-PHD programs or those with 5th year standing in ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
ISEE-640
Computer-Aided Design & Mfg
This course provides an introduction to computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) using Solidworks and MasterCAM. Students will learn how to model individual parts and assemblies. These skills will then be applied in a manufacturing context to produce CAD models of molds, jigs, and fixtures. Lastly, students will learn to generate CNC toolpaths from their CAD models. Students may not take this course for credit if they have already taken another Solidworks modeling course. (Prerequisites: ISEE-140 or MECE-104 or equivalent course or students in ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, ENGMGT-ME, MECE-MS, MECE-ME, or MIE-PHD programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
ISEE-740
Design for Manufacture and Assembly
Course reviews operating principles of prevalent processes such as casting, molding, and machining. Students will use this knowledge to select appropriate production processes for a given component. For each process covered, guidelines governing proper design for manufacturability practices will be discussed and applied. (Prerequisites: ISEE-140 or MECE-104 or equivalent course or students in ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, ENGMGT-ME, MECE-MS, MECE-ME, or MIE-PHD programs.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
ISEE-741
3D Printing
This course begins with an introduction to commercial rapid prototyping processes, the materials involved, and the physics behind how they work. The course then transitions to research topics involving novel processes, applications, and materials. Class activities include a mix of lecture, lab, and project work. (Prerequisites: ISEE-140 or ISEE-304 or MECE-104 or MECE-304 or MECE-305 or equivalent course or students in ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, ENGMGT-ME, MECE-MS, MECE-ME or MIE-PHD programs.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
ISEE-787
Design for Enviroment
This course will provide the student with systematic approaches for designing and developing environmentally responsible products. In particular, design trade-offs will be explored. (Prerequisites: ISEE-140 or ISEE-304 or MECE-304 or MECE-305 or students in SUSPRD-MN, ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, ENGMGT-ME, MECE-MS, MECE-ME, MIE-PHD programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall).

Supply Chain Management

Electives
ISEE-703
Supply Chain Management  
Supply chain management is unique in that it is one of the oldest business activities and yet has been recently discovered as a potentially powerful source of competitive advantage. Supply chain system activities, such as planning production levels, forecasting demand, managing inventory, warehousing, transportation, and locating facilities have been performed since the start of commercial activity. It is difficult to visualize any product that could reach a customer without a consciously designed supply chain. Yet it is only recently that many firms have started focusing on supply chain management. There is a realization that no company can do any better than its supply chain and logistics systems. This becomes even more important given that product life cycles are shrinking and competition is intense. Logistics and supply chain management today represents a great challenge as well as a tremendous opportunity for most firms. (This course is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or ISE department dual degree students.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
ISEE-704
Logistics Management
This course discusses several strategic, tactical, and operational concepts used in improving the distribution of goods and services by companies worldwide. The course emphasis is on understanding when and how these concepts are applied, as well as on using mathematical programming and optimization methods for their adequate implementation. (Prerequisites: ISEE-420 or ISEE-720 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
Choose one of the following
    ISEE-708
Simulation Analysis
Simulation Analysis focuses on simulation design, analysis, and applied research methods for industrial and service systems. In particular, the course covers discrete-event, agent-based, and continuous simulation modeling approaches; data driven simulation models; design and analysis of simulation experiments and optimization; artificial intelligence (AI) simulation methods; and Industry 4.0/Digital Twin simulation. (Prerequisites: ISEE-510 or equivalent course or students in ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, ENGMGT-ME, MIE-PHD, MMSI-MS programs or MMSI-MS dual degree students) Lecture 3 (Spring).
    ISEE-711
Advanced Simulation
An advanced course in developing simulation models using good model building, verification and validation procedures. Emphasis will be on review and use of probability distributions, simulation output data analysis for making good decisions, comparison of alternative system configurations, use of designed experiments and the use of advanced simulation techniques. Real world case studies will be examined to convey understanding and teaching of the material. Students will be asked to build models, so simulation experience and working knowledge of a simulation language will be required. (Prerequisites: ISEE-510 or ISEE-610 or ISEE-708 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
ISEE-720
Production Control
This course covers the process and the analysis methods used to produce goods and services to support of the production and operations management functions. Topics include: forecasting, inventory policies and models, job shop scheduling, aggregate production planning, and ERP systems. Students will understand the importance of production control and its relationship to other functions within the organization, and the role of mathematical optimization to support production planning. The course emphasizes how a production process can be characterized by a process that requires answering a sequence of decision-making problems. The course will show how the production functions integrate with each other and how their coordination can be automated through mathematical programming. Identifying opportunities for improvement through optimization is also highlighted. (Prerequisites: ISEE-601 or (ISEE-301 and (STAT-251 or MATH-251)) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Spring).

Combined Accelerated Bachelor’s/Master’s Degrees

The curriculum below outlines the typical course sequence(s) for combined accelerated degrees available with this bachelor's degree.

Industrial Engineering, BS degree/Industrial and Systems Engineering, MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CHMG-131
General Chemistry for Engineers (General Education – Elective)
This rigorous course is primarily for, but not limited to, engineering students. Topics include an introduction to some basic concepts in chemistry, stoichiometry, First Law of Thermodynamics, thermochemistry, electronic theory of composition and structure, and chemical bonding. The lecture is supported by workshop-style problem sessions. Offered in traditional and online format. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-120
Fundamentals of Industrial Engineering
This course introduces students to industrial engineering and provides students with foundational tools used in the profession. The course is intended to prepare students for their first co-op experience in industrial engineering by exposing them to tools and concepts that are often encountered during early co-op assignments. The course covers specific tools and their applications, including systems design and the integration. The course uses a combination of lecture and laboratory activities. Projects and group exercises will be used to cover hands-on applications and problem-solving related to topics covered in lectures. (This class is restricted to ISEE-BS, ENGRX-UND, or ISEEDU Major students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-140
Materials Processing
A study of the application of machine tools and fabrication processes to engineering materials in the manufacture of products. Processes covered include cutting, molding, casting, forming, powder metallurgy, solid modeling, engineering drawing, and welding. Students make a project in the lab portion of the course. (This class is restricted to ISEE-BS, ENGRX-UND, or ISEEDU Major students.) Lab 1, Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MATH-181
Project-Based Calculus I (General Education – Mathematical Perspective A)
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals. (Prerequisites: MATH-111 or (NMTH-220 and NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275) or equivalent courses with a minimum grade of B-, or a score of at least 60% on the RIT Mathematics Placement Exam. Co-requisites: MATH-181R or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
MATH-182
Project-Based Calculus II (General Education – Mathematical Perspective B)
This is the second in a two-course sequence. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or MATH-181A or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
PHYS-211
University Physics I (General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective)
This is a course in calculus-based physics for science and engineering majors. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton's Laws, gravitation, work and energy, momentum and impulse, conservation laws, systems of particles, rotational motion, static equilibrium, mechanical oscillations and waves, and data presentation/analysis. The course is taught in a workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: MATH-182 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
YOPS-010
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. (This class is restricted to incoming 1st year or global campus students.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
First-Year Writing (WI) (General Education)
3
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
 
General Education – Elective
3
Second Year
EGEN-99
Engineering Co-op Preparation
This course will prepare students, who are entering their second year of study, for both the job search and employment in the field of engineering. Students will learn strategies for conducting a successful job search, including the preparation of resumes and cover letters; behavioral interviewing techniques and effective use of social media in the application process. Professional and ethical responsibilities during the job search and for co-op and subsequent professional experiences will be discussed. (This course is restricted to students in Kate Gleason College of Engineering with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
ISEE-200
General Education – Elective: Computing for Engineers
This course aims to help undergraduate students in understanding the latest software engineering techniques and their applications in the context of industrial and systems engineering. The topics of this course include the fundamental concepts and applications of computer programming, software engineering, computational problem solving, and statistical techniques for data mining and analytics. (This class is restricted to ISEE-BS, ENGRX-UND, or ISEEDU Major students.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ISEE-325
Engineering Statistics and Design of Experiments
This course covers statistics for use in engineering as well as the primary concepts of experimental design. The first portion of the course will cover: Point estimation; hypothesis testing and confidence intervals; one- and two-sample inference. The remainder of the class will be spent on concepts of design and analysis of experiments. Lectures and assignments will incorporate real-world science and engineering examples, including studies found in the literature. (Prerequisites: STAT-251 or MATH-251 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-345
Engineering Economy
Time value of money, methods of comparing alternatives, depreciation and depletion, income tax consideration and capital budgeting. Cannot be used as a professional elective for ISE majors. Course provides a foundation for engineers to effectively analyze engineering projects with respect to financial considerations. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-499
Co-op (summer)
One semester of paid work experience in industrial engineering. (Prerequisites: ISEE-120 and EGEN-99 and students in the ISEE-BS program.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
MATH-221
Multivariable and Vector Calculus (General Education – Elective)
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes a study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, Stokes' Theorem, Green's Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-219. (Prerequisite: C- or better MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
4
MATH-233
Linear Systems and Differential Equations (General Education – Elective)
This is an introductory course in linear algebra and ordinary differential equations in which a scientific computing package is used to clarify mathematical concepts, visualize problems, and work with large systems. The course covers matrix algebra, the basic notions and techniques of ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients, and the physical situation in which they arise. (Prerequisites: MATH-172 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A and students in CHEM-BS or CHEM-BS/MS or ISEE-BS programs.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
4
MATH-251
Probability and Statistics (General Education – Elective)
This course introduces sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability and independence, distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions (discrete and continuous), the central limit theorem, descriptive statistics, interval estimation, and applications of probability and statistics to real-world problems. A statistical package such as Minitab or R is used for data analysis and statistical applications. (Prerequisites: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH 182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
MECE-200
Fundamentals of Mechanics
Statics: equilibrium, the principle of transmissibility of forces, couples, centroids, trusses and friction. Introduction to strength of materials: axial stresses and strains, statically indeterminate problems, torsion and bending. Dynamics: dynamics of particles and rigid bodies with an introduction to kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies, work, energy, impulse momentum and mechanical vibrations. Emphasis is on problem solving. For students majoring in industrial and systems engineering. (Prerequisites: PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or 1017-312 or 1017-312T or 1017-389 or PHYS-206 and PHYS-207 or equivalent course.and restricted to students in ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS programs.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
4
PHYS-212
University Physics II (General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective)
This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: (PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or PHYS-216) or (MECE-102, MECE-103 and MECE-205) and (MATH-182 or MATH-172 or MATH-182A) or equivalent courses. Grades of C- or better are required in all prerequisite courses.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
Third Year
ISEE-301
Operations Research
An introduction to optimization through mathematical programming and stochastic modeling techniques. Course topics include linear programming, transportation and assignment algorithms, Markov Chain queuing and their application on problems in manufacturing, health care, financial systems, supply chain, and other engineering disciplines. Special attention is placed on sensitivity analysis and the need of optimization in decision-making. The course is delivered through lectures and a weekly laboratory where students learn to use state-of-the-art software packages for modeling large discrete optimization problems. (Prerequisites: MATH-233 or (MATH-231 and MATH-241) or equivalent course.) Lab 2, Lecture 3 (Spring).
4
ISEE-304
Fundamentals of Materials Science
This course provides the student with an overview of structure, properties, and processing of metals, polymers, ceramics and composites. There is a particular emphasis on understanding of materials and the relative impact on manufacturing optimization throughput and quality as it relates to Industrial Engineering. This course is delivered through lectures and a weekly laboratory. (This course is restricted to ISEE-BS Major students.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Spring).
3
ISEE-323
Systems and Facilities Planning
A basic course in quantitative models on layout, material handling, and warehousing. Topics include product/process analysis, flow of materials, material handling systems, warehousing and layout design. A computer-aided layout design package is used. (Corequisites: ISEE-301 or equivalent course.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Spring).
3
ISEE-330
Ergonomics and Human Factors (WI-PR)
This course covers the physical and cognitive aspects of human performance to enable students to design work places, procedures, products and processes that are consistent with human capabilities and limitations. Principles of physical work and human anthropometry are studied to enable the student to systematically design work places, processes, and systems that are consistent with human capabilities and limitations. In addition, the human information processing capabilities are studied, which includes the human sensory, memory, attention and cognitive processes; display and control design principles; as well as human computer interface design. (Co-requisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
4
ISEE-350
Engineering Management
Development of the fundamental engineering management principles of industrial enterprise, including an introduction to project management. Emphasis is on project management and the development of the project management plan. At least one term of previous co-op experience is required. (Prerequisite: BIME-499 or MECE-499 or ISEE-499 or CHME-499 or EEEE-499 or CMPE-499 or MCEE-499 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ISEE-499
Co-op (fall, summer)
One semester of paid work experience in industrial engineering. (Prerequisites: ISEE-120 and EGEN-99 and students in the ISEE-BS program.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
Fourth Year
ISEE-420
Production Planning/Scheduling
A first course in mathematical modeling of production-inventory systems. Topics included: Inventory: Deterministic Models, Inventory: Stochastic Models, Push v. Pull Production Control Systems, Factory Physics, and Operations Scheduling. Modern aspects such as lean manufacturing are included in the context of the course. (Prerequisites: ISEE-301 and (STAT-251 or MATH-251) or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ISEE-499
Co-op (summer)
One semester of paid work experience in industrial engineering. (Prerequisites: ISEE-120 and EGEN-99 and students in the ISEE-BS program.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
ISEE-510
Systems Simulation
Computer-based simulation of dynamic and stochastic systems. Simulation modeling and analysis methods are the focus of this course. A high-level simulation language such as Simio, ARENA, etc., will be used to model systems and examine system performance. Model validation, design of simulation experiments, and random number generation will be introduced. (Prerequisites: ISEE-200 and ISEE-301 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-560
Applied Statistical Quality Control
An applied approach to statistical quality control utilizing theoretical tools acquired in other math and statistics courses. Heavy emphasis on understanding and applying statistical analysis methods in real-world quality control situations in engineering. Topics include process capability analysis, acceptance sampling, hypothesis testing and control charts. Contemporary topics such as six-sigma are included within the context of the course. (Prerequisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course and students in ISEE-BS or ISEE-MN or ENGMGT-MN programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ISEE-760
Design of Experiments
This course presents an in-depth study of the primary concepts of experimental design. Its applied approach uses theoretical tools acquired in other mathematics and statistics courses. Emphasis is placed on the role of replication and randomization in experimentation. Numerous designs and design strategies are reviewed and implications on data analysis are discussed. Topics include: consideration of type 1 and type 2 errors in experimentation, sample size determination, completely randomized designs, randomized complete block designs, blocking and confounding in experiments, Latin square and Graeco Latin square designs, general factorial designs, the 2k factorial design system, the 3k factorial design system, fractional factorial designs, Taguchi experimentation. (Prerequisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course or students in ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, ENGMGT-ME, or MIE-PHD programs.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ISEE-795
Graduate Seminar (fall and spring)
This class introduces students to state of the art research and research methods in industrial, systems, and sustainable engineering. Presentations include off campus speakers and students/faculty presentations on current research under way in the department. (This course is restricted to students in ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS or ISEE BS/MS.) Seminar 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
Professional Electives
9
 
Open Electives
9
 
General Education – Immersion 1, 2
6
Fifth Year
ISEE-497
Multidisciplinary Senior Design I
This is the first in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. This first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. The second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: ISEE-323 and ISEE-330 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: ISEE-350 and ISEE-420 and ISEE-510 and ISEE-560 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
ISEE-498
Multidisciplinary Senior Design II
This is the second in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. The first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. This second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: ISEE-497 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-561
Linear Regression Analysis
In any system where parameters of interest change, it may be of interest to examine the effects that some variables exert (or appear to exert) on others. "Regression analysis" actually describes a variety of data analysis techniques that can be used to describe the interrelationships among such variables. In this course we will examine in detail the use of one popular analytic technique: least squares linear regression. Cases illustrating the use of regression techniques in engineering applications will be developed and analyzed throughout the course. (Prerequisites: (MATH-233 or (MATH-231 and MATH-241)) and (ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252) or equivalent courses and students in ISEE-BS programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ISEE-771
Engineering of Systems I
The engineering of a system is focused on the identification of value and the value chain, requirements management and engineering, understanding the limitations of current systems, the development of the overall concept, and continually improving the robustness of the defined solution. EOS I & II is a 2-semester course sequence focused on the creation of systems that generate value for both the customer and the enterprise. Through systematic analysis and synthesis methods, novel solutions to problems are proposed and selected. This first course in the sequence focuses on the definition of the system requirements by systematic analysis of the existing problems, issues and solutions, to create an improved vision for a new system. Based on this new vision, new high-level solutions will be identified and selected for (hypothetical) further development. The focus is to learn systems engineering through a focus on an actual artifact (This course is restricted to students in the ISEE BS/MS, ISEE BS/ME, ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, PRODDEV-MS, MFLEAD-MS, ENGMGT-ME, or MIE-PHD programs or those with 5th year standing in ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
Choose one of the following:
6
   ISEE-788
   Project with Paper plus 1 additional Graduate Elective
This course is used by students as a capstone experience. The student must demonstrate an acquired competence in a topic that is chosen in conference with a faculty advisor. The work may involve a research and/or design project with demonstration of acquired knowledge. A written paper and an oral presentation of the work are required. Project 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
   ISEE-790
   Thesis
In conference with a faculty adviser, an independent engineering project or research problem is selected. The work may be of a theoretical and/or computational nature. A state-of-the-art literature search in the area is normally expected. A formal written thesis and an oral defense with a faculty thesis committee are required. Submission of bound copies of the thesis to the library and to the department and preparation of a written paper in a short format suitable for submission for publication in a refereed journal are also required. Approval of department head and faculty adviser needed to enroll. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Thesis (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
   ISEE-792
   Engineering Capstone plus 1 additional Graduate Elective
Students must investigate a discipline-related topic in a field related to industrial and systems engineering, engineering management, sustainable engineering, product development, or manufacturing leadership. The general intent of the engineering capstone is to demonstrate the students' knowledge of the integrative aspects of a particular area. The capstone should draw upon skills and knowledge acquired in the program. (This course is restricted to students in ISEE-MS, ENGMGT-ME, SUSTAIN-MS, PRODDEV-MS, MFLEAD-MS or the ISEE BS/MS programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
 
 
Graduate Electives
9
 
General Education – Immersion 3
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
150

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI-PR) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Industrial Engineering, BS degree/Engineering Management, ME degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CHMG-131
General Chemistry for Engineers (General Education – Elective)
This rigorous course is primarily for, but not limited to, engineering students. Topics include an introduction to some basic concepts in chemistry, stoichiometry, First Law of Thermodynamics, thermochemistry, electronic theory of composition and structure, and chemical bonding. The lecture is supported by workshop-style problem sessions. Offered in traditional and online format. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-120
Fundamentals of Industrial Engineering
This course introduces students to industrial engineering and provides students with foundational tools used in the profession. The course is intended to prepare students for their first co-op experience in industrial engineering by exposing them to tools and concepts that are often encountered during early co-op assignments. The course covers specific tools and their applications, including systems design and the integration. The course uses a combination of lecture and laboratory activities. Projects and group exercises will be used to cover hands-on applications and problem-solving related to topics covered in lectures. (This class is restricted to ISEE-BS, ENGRX-UND, or ISEEDU Major students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-140
Materials Processing
A study of the application of machine tools and fabrication processes to engineering materials in the manufacture of products. Processes covered include cutting, molding, casting, forming, powder metallurgy, solid modeling, engineering drawing, and welding. Students make a project in the lab portion of the course. (This class is restricted to ISEE-BS, ENGRX-UND, or ISEEDU Major students.) Lab 1, Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MATH-181
Project-Based Calculus I (General Education – Mathematical Perspective A)
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals. (Prerequisites: MATH-111 or (NMTH-220 and NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275) or equivalent courses with a minimum grade of B-, or a score of at least 60% on the RIT Mathematics Placement Exam. Co-requisites: MATH-181R or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
MATH-182
Project-Based Calculus II (General Education – Mathematical Perspective B)
This is the second in a two-course sequence. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or MATH-181A or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
PHYS-211
University Physics I (General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective)
This is a course in calculus-based physics for science and engineering majors. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton's Laws, gravitation, work and energy, momentum and impulse, conservation laws, systems of particles, rotational motion, static equilibrium, mechanical oscillations and waves, and data presentation/analysis. The course is taught in a workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: MATH-182 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
YOPS-010
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. (This class is restricted to incoming 1st year or global campus students.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
First Year Writing (WI) (General Education)
3
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
 
General Education – Elective
3
Second Year
EGEN-99
Engineering Co-op Preparation
This course will prepare students, who are entering their second year of study, for both the job search and employment in the field of engineering. Students will learn strategies for conducting a successful job search, including the preparation of resumes and cover letters; behavioral interviewing techniques and effective use of social media in the application process. Professional and ethical responsibilities during the job search and for co-op and subsequent professional experiences will be discussed. (This course is restricted to students in Kate Gleason College of Engineering with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
ISEE-200
Computing for Engineers (General Education – Elective)
This course aims to help undergraduate students in understanding the latest software engineering techniques and their applications in the context of industrial and systems engineering. The topics of this course include the fundamental concepts and applications of computer programming, software engineering, computational problem solving, and statistical techniques for data mining and analytics. (This class is restricted to ISEE-BS, ENGRX-UND, or ISEEDU Major students.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ISEE-325
Engineering Statistics and Design of Experiments
This course covers statistics for use in engineering as well as the primary concepts of experimental design. The first portion of the course will cover: Point estimation; hypothesis testing and confidence intervals; one- and two-sample inference. The remainder of the class will be spent on concepts of design and analysis of experiments. Lectures and assignments will incorporate real-world science and engineering examples, including studies found in the literature. (Prerequisites: STAT-251 or MATH-251 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-345
Engineering Economy
Time value of money, methods of comparing alternatives, depreciation and depletion, income tax consideration and capital budgeting. Cannot be used as a professional elective for ISE majors. Course provides a foundation for engineers to effectively analyze engineering projects with respect to financial considerations. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-499
Co-op (summer)
One semester of paid work experience in industrial engineering. (Prerequisites: ISEE-120 and EGEN-99 and students in the ISEE-BS program.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
MATH-221
Multivariable and Vector Calculus (General Education – Elective)
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes a study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, Stokes' Theorem, Green's Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-219. (Prerequisite: C- or better MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
4
MATH-233
Linear Systems and Differential Equations (General Education – Elective)
This is an introductory course in linear algebra and ordinary differential equations in which a scientific computing package is used to clarify mathematical concepts, visualize problems, and work with large systems. The course covers matrix algebra, the basic notions and techniques of ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients, and the physical situation in which they arise. (Prerequisites: MATH-172 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A and students in CHEM-BS or CHEM-BS/MS or ISEE-BS programs.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
4
MATH-251
Probability and Statistics (General Education – Elective)
This course introduces sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability and independence, distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions (discrete and continuous), the central limit theorem, descriptive statistics, interval estimation, and applications of probability and statistics to real-world problems. A statistical package such as Minitab or R is used for data analysis and statistical applications. (Prerequisites: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH 182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
MECE-200
Fundamentals of Mechanics
Statics: equilibrium, the principle of transmissibility of forces, couples, centroids, trusses and friction. Introduction to strength of materials: axial stresses and strains, statically indeterminate problems, torsion and bending. Dynamics: dynamics of particles and rigid bodies with an introduction to kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies, work, energy, impulse momentum and mechanical vibrations. Emphasis is on problem solving. For students majoring in industrial and systems engineering. (Prerequisites: PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or 1017-312 or 1017-312T or 1017-389 or PHYS-206 and PHYS-207 or equivalent course.and restricted to students in ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS programs.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
4
PHYS-212
University Physics II (General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective)
This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: (PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or PHYS-216) or (MECE-102, MECE-103 and MECE-205) and (MATH-182 or MATH-172 or MATH-182A) or equivalent courses. Grades of C- or better are required in all prerequisite courses.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
Third Year
ISEE-301
Operations Research
An introduction to optimization through mathematical programming and stochastic modeling techniques. Course topics include linear programming, transportation and assignment algorithms, Markov Chain queuing and their application on problems in manufacturing, health care, financial systems, supply chain, and other engineering disciplines. Special attention is placed on sensitivity analysis and the need of optimization in decision-making. The course is delivered through lectures and a weekly laboratory where students learn to use state-of-the-art software packages for modeling large discrete optimization problems. (Prerequisites: MATH-233 or (MATH-231 and MATH-241) or equivalent course.) Lab 2, Lecture 3 (Spring).
4
ISEE-304
Fundamentals of Materials Science
This course provides the student with an overview of structure, properties, and processing of metals, polymers, ceramics and composites. There is a particular emphasis on understanding of materials and the relative impact on manufacturing optimization throughput and quality as it relates to Industrial Engineering. This course is delivered through lectures and a weekly laboratory. (This course is restricted to ISEE-BS Major students.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Spring).
3
ISEE-323
Systems and Facilities Planning
A basic course in quantitative models on layout, material handling, and warehousing. Topics include product/process analysis, flow of materials, material handling systems, warehousing and layout design. A computer-aided layout design package is used. (Corequisites: ISEE-301 or equivalent course.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Spring).
3
ISEE-330
Ergonomics and Human Factors (WI-PR)
This course covers the physical and cognitive aspects of human performance to enable students to design work places, procedures, products and processes that are consistent with human capabilities and limitations. Principles of physical work and human anthropometry are studied to enable the student to systematically design work places, processes, and systems that are consistent with human capabilities and limitations. In addition, the human information processing capabilities are studied, which includes the human sensory, memory, attention and cognitive processes; display and control design principles; as well as human computer interface design. (Co-requisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
4
ISEE-350
Engineering Management
Development of the fundamental engineering management principles of industrial enterprise, including an introduction to project management. Emphasis is on project management and the development of the project management plan. At least one term of previous co-op experience is required. (Prerequisite: BIME-499 or MECE-499 or ISEE-499 or CHME-499 or EEEE-499 or CMPE-499 or MCEE-499 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ISEE-499
Co-op (fall, summer)
One semester of paid work experience in industrial engineering. (Prerequisites: ISEE-120 and EGEN-99 and students in the ISEE-BS program.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
Fourth Year
ISEE-420
Production Planning/Scheduling
A first course in mathematical modeling of production-inventory systems. Topics included: Inventory: Deterministic Models, Inventory: Stochastic Models, Push v. Pull Production Control Systems, Factory Physics, and Operations Scheduling. Modern aspects such as lean manufacturing are included in the context of the course. (Prerequisites: ISEE-301 and (STAT-251 or MATH-251) or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ISEE-499
Co-op (summer)
One semester of paid work experience in industrial engineering. (Prerequisites: ISEE-120 and EGEN-99 and students in the ISEE-BS program.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
ISEE-510
Systems Simulation
Computer-based simulation of dynamic and stochastic systems. Simulation modeling and analysis methods are the focus of this course. A high-level simulation language such as Simio, ARENA, etc., will be used to model systems and examine system performance. Model validation, design of simulation experiments, and random number generation will be introduced. (Prerequisites: ISEE-200 and ISEE-301 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-560
Applied Statistical Quality Control
An applied approach to statistical quality control utilizing theoretical tools acquired in other math and statistics courses. Heavy emphasis on understanding and applying statistical analysis methods in real-world quality control situations in engineering. Topics include process capability analysis, acceptance sampling, hypothesis testing and control charts. Contemporary topics such as six-sigma are included within the context of the course. (Prerequisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course and students in ISEE-BS or ISEE-MN or ENGMGT-MN programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ISEE-760
Design of Experiments
This course presents an in-depth study of the primary concepts of experimental design. Its applied approach uses theoretical tools acquired in other mathematics and statistics courses. Emphasis is placed on the role of replication and randomization in experimentation. Numerous designs and design strategies are reviewed and implications on data analysis are discussed. Topics include: consideration of type 1 and type 2 errors in experimentation, sample size determination, completely randomized designs, randomized complete block designs, blocking and confounding in experiments, Latin square and Graeco Latin square designs, general factorial designs, the 2k factorial design system, the 3k factorial design system, fractional factorial designs, Taguchi experimentation. (Prerequisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course or students in ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, ENGMGT-ME, or MIE-PHD programs.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
 
Professional Electives
6
 
Open Electives
9
 
Professional Elective/Engineering Management Elective
3
 
General Education – Immersion 1, 2
6
Fifth Year
ACCT-794
Cost Management in Technical Organizations
A first course in accounting for students in technical disciplines. Topics include the distinction between external and internal accounting, cost behavior, product costing, profitability analysis, performance evaluation, capital budgeting, and transfer pricing. Emphasis is on issues encountered in technology intensive manufacturing organizations. *Note: This course is not intended for Saunders College of Business students. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ISEE-497
Multidisciplinary Senior Design I
This is the first in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. This first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. The second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: ISEE-323 and ISEE-330 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: ISEE-350 and ISEE-420 and ISEE-510 and ISEE-560 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
ISEE-498
Multidisciplinary Senior Design II (WI)
This is the second in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. The first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. This second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: ISEE-497 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-561
Linear Regression Analysis
In any system where parameters of interest change, it may be of interest to examine the effects that some variables exert (or appear to exert) on others. "Regression analysis" actually describes a variety of data analysis techniques that can be used to describe the interrelationships among such variables. In this course we will examine in detail the use of one popular analytic technique: least squares linear regression. Cases illustrating the use of regression techniques in engineering applications will be developed and analyzed throughout the course. (Prerequisites: (MATH-233 or (MATH-231 and MATH-241)) and (ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252) or equivalent courses and students in ISEE-BS programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ISEE-750
Systems and Project Management
This course ensures progress toward objectives, proper deployment and conservation of human and financial resources, and achievement of cost and schedule targets. The focus of the course is on the utilization of a diverse set of project management methods and tools. Topics include strategic project management, project and organization learning, chartering, adaptive project management methodologies, structuring of performance measures and metrics, technical teams and project management, risk management, and process control. Course delivery consists of lectures, speakers, case studies, and experience sharing, and reinforces collaborative project-based learning and continuous improvement. (Prerequisites: ISEE-350 or equivalent course or students in ISEE BS/MS, ISEE BS/ME, ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, ENGMGT-ME, PRODDEV-MS, MFLEAD-MS, or MIE-PHD programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ISEE-771
Engineering of Systems I
The engineering of a system is focused on the identification of value and the value chain, requirements management and engineering, understanding the limitations of current systems, the development of the overall concept, and continually improving the robustness of the defined solution. EOS I & II is a 2-semester course sequence focused on the creation of systems that generate value for both the customer and the enterprise. Through systematic analysis and synthesis methods, novel solutions to problems are proposed and selected. This first course in the sequence focuses on the definition of the system requirements by systematic analysis of the existing problems, issues and solutions, to create an improved vision for a new system. Based on this new vision, new high-level solutions will be identified and selected for (hypothetical) further development. The focus is to learn systems engineering through a focus on an actual artifact (This course is restricted to students in the ISEE BS/MS, ISEE BS/ME, ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, PRODDEV-MS, MFLEAD-MS, ENGMGT-ME, or MIE-PHD programs or those with 5th year standing in ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
Choose one of the following:
3
   ISEE-792
   Engineering Capstone
Students must investigate a discipline-related topic in a field related to industrial and systems engineering, engineering management, sustainable engineering, product development, or manufacturing leadership. The general intent of the engineering capstone is to demonstrate the students' knowledge of the integrative aspects of a particular area. The capstone should draw upon skills and knowledge acquired in the program. (This course is restricted to students in ISEE-MS, ENGMGT-ME, SUSTAIN-MS, PRODDEV-MS, MFLEAD-MS or the ISEE BS/MS programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
 
   ISEE-794
   Leadership Capstone plus 1 additional Engineering Elective
For students enrolled in the BS/ME dual degree program. Student must either: 1) serve as a team leader for the multidisciplinary senior design project, where they must apply leadership, project management, and system engineering skills to the solution of unstructured, open-ended, multi-disciplinary real-world engineering problems, or 2) demonstrate leadership through the investigation of a discipline-related topic. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Seminar (Fall, Spring).
 
 
Engineering Management Electives
6
 
General Education – Immersion 3
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
150

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI-PR) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Industrial Engineering, BS degree/Engineering Management, MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CHMG-131
General Chemistry for Engineers (General Education – Elective)
This rigorous course is primarily for, but not limited to, engineering students. Topics include an introduction to some basic concepts in chemistry, stoichiometry, First Law of Thermodynamics, thermochemistry, electronic theory of composition and structure, and chemical bonding. The lecture is supported by workshop-style problem sessions. Offered in traditional and online format. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-120
Fundamentals of Industrial Engineering
This course introduces students to industrial engineering and provides students with foundational tools used in the profession. The course is intended to prepare students for their first co-op experience in industrial engineering by exposing them to tools and concepts that are often encountered during early co-op assignments. The course covers specific tools and their applications, including systems design and the integration. The course uses a combination of lecture and laboratory activities. Projects and group exercises will be used to cover hands-on applications and problem-solving related to topics covered in lectures. (This class is restricted to ISEE-BS, ENGRX-UND, or ISEEDU Major students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-140
Materials Processing
A study of the application of machine tools and fabrication processes to engineering materials in the manufacture of products. Processes covered include cutting, molding, casting, forming, powder metallurgy, solid modeling, engineering drawing, and welding. Students make a project in the lab portion of the course. (This class is restricted to ISEE-BS, ENGRX-UND, or ISEEDU Major students.) Lab 1, Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MATH-181
Calculus I (General Education – Mathematical Perspective A)
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals. (Prerequisites: MATH-111 or (NMTH-220 and NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275) or equivalent courses with a minimum grade of B-, or a score of at least 60% on the RIT Mathematics Placement Exam. Co-requisites: MATH-181R or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
MATH-182
Calculus II (General Education – Mathematical Perspective B)
This is the second in a two-course sequence. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or MATH-181A or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
PHYS-211
University Physics I (General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective)
This is a course in calculus-based physics for science and engineering majors. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton's Laws, gravitation, work and energy, momentum and impulse, conservation laws, systems of particles, rotational motion, static equilibrium, mechanical oscillations and waves, and data presentation/analysis. The course is taught in a workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: MATH-182 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
YOPS-010
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. (This class is restricted to incoming 1st year or global campus students.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
 
General Education – First-Year Writing (WI)
3
 
General Education – Elective
3
Second Year
EGEN-99
Engineering Co-Op Preparation
This course will prepare students, who are entering their second year of study, for both the job search and employment in the field of engineering. Students will learn strategies for conducting a successful job search, including the preparation of resumes and cover letters; behavioral interviewing techniques and effective use of social media in the application process. Professional and ethical responsibilities during the job search and for co-op and subsequent professional experiences will be discussed. (This course is restricted to students in Kate Gleason College of Engineering with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
ISEE-200
Computing for Engineers (General Education – Elective)
This course aims to help undergraduate students in understanding the latest software engineering techniques and their applications in the context of industrial and systems engineering. The topics of this course include the fundamental concepts and applications of computer programming, software engineering, computational problem solving, and statistical techniques for data mining and analytics. (This class is restricted to ISEE-BS, ENGRX-UND, or ISEEDU Major students.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ISEE-325
Engineering Statistics and Design of Experiments
This course covers statistics for use in engineering as well as the primary concepts of experimental design. The first portion of the course will cover: Point estimation; hypothesis testing and confidence intervals; one- and two-sample inference. The remainder of the class will be spent on concepts of design and analysis of experiments. Lectures and assignments will incorporate real-world science and engineering examples, including studies found in the literature. (Prerequisites: STAT-251 or MATH-251 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-345
Engineering Economy
Time value of money, methods of comparing alternatives, depreciation and depletion, income tax consideration and capital budgeting. Cannot be used as a professional elective for ISE majors. Course provides a foundation for engineers to effectively analyze engineering projects with respect to financial considerations. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-499
Co-op (summer)
One semester of paid work experience in industrial engineering. (Prerequisites: ISEE-120 and EGEN-99 and students in the ISEE-BS program.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
MATH-221
Multivariable and Vector Calculus (General Education – Elective)
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes a study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, Stokes' Theorem, Green's Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-219. (Prerequisite: C- or better MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
4
MATH-233
Linear Systems and Differential Equations (General Education – Elective)
This is an introductory course in linear algebra and ordinary differential equations in which a scientific computing package is used to clarify mathematical concepts, visualize problems, and work with large systems. The course covers matrix algebra, the basic notions and techniques of ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients, and the physical situation in which they arise. (Prerequisites: MATH-172 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A and students in CHEM-BS or CHEM-BS/MS or ISEE-BS programs.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
4
MATH-251
Probability and Statistics (General Education – Elective)
This course introduces sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability and independence, distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions (discrete and continuous), the central limit theorem, descriptive statistics, interval estimation, and applications of probability and statistics to real-world problems. A statistical package such as Minitab or R is used for data analysis and statistical applications. (Prerequisites: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH 182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
MECE-200
Fundamentals of Mechanics
Statics: equilibrium, the principle of transmissibility of forces, couples, centroids, trusses and friction. Introduction to strength of materials: axial stresses and strains, statically indeterminate problems, torsion and bending. Dynamics: dynamics of particles and rigid bodies with an introduction to kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies, work, energy, impulse momentum and mechanical vibrations. Emphasis is on problem solving. For students majoring in industrial and systems engineering. (Prerequisites: PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or 1017-312 or 1017-312T or 1017-389 or PHYS-206 and PHYS-207 or equivalent course.and restricted to students in ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS programs.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
4
PHYS-212
University Physics II (General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective)
This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: (PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or PHYS-216) or (MECE-102, MECE-103 and MECE-205) and (MATH-182 or MATH-172 or MATH-182A) or equivalent courses. Grades of C- or better are required in all prerequisite courses.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
Third Year
ISEE-301
Operations Research
An introduction to optimization through mathematical programming and stochastic modeling techniques. Course topics include linear programming, transportation and assignment algorithms, Markov Chain queuing and their application on problems in manufacturing, health care, financial systems, supply chain, and other engineering disciplines. Special attention is placed on sensitivity analysis and the need of optimization in decision-making. The course is delivered through lectures and a weekly laboratory where students learn to use state-of-the-art software packages for modeling large discrete optimization problems. (Prerequisites: MATH-233 or (MATH-231 and MATH-241) or equivalent course.) Lab 2, Lecture 3 (Spring).
4
ISEE-323
Systems and Facilities Planning
A basic course in quantitative models on layout, material handling, and warehousing. Topics include product/process analysis, flow of materials, material handling systems, warehousing and layout design. A computer-aided layout design package is used. (Corequisites: ISEE-301 or equivalent course.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Spring).
3
ISEE-330
Ergonomics and Human Factors (WI-PR)
This course covers the physical and cognitive aspects of human performance to enable students to design work places, procedures, products and processes that are consistent with human capabilities and limitations. Principles of physical work and human anthropometry are studied to enable the student to systematically design work places, processes, and systems that are consistent with human capabilities and limitations. In addition, the human information processing capabilities are studied, which includes the human sensory, memory, attention and cognitive processes; display and control design principles; as well as human computer interface design. (Co-requisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
4
ISEE-350
Engineering Management
Development of the fundamental engineering management principles of industrial enterprise, including an introduction to project management. Emphasis is on project management and the development of the project management plan. At least one term of previous co-op experience is required. (Prerequisite: BIME-499 or MECE-499 or ISEE-499 or CHME-499 or EEEE-499 or CMPE-499 or MCEE-499 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ISEE-499
Co-op (fall, summer)
One semester of paid work experience in industrial engineering. (Prerequisites: ISEE-120 and EGEN-99 and students in the ISEE-BS program.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
ISEE-304
Fundamentals of Materials Science
This course provides the student with an overview of structure, properties, and processing of metals, polymers, ceramics and composites. There is a particular emphasis on understanding of materials and the relative impact on manufacturing optimization throughput and quality as it relates to Industrial Engineering. This course is delivered through lectures and a weekly laboratory. (This course is restricted to ISEE-BS Major students.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Spring).
3
Fourth Year
ISEE-420
Production Planning/Scheduling
A first course in mathematical modeling of production-inventory systems. Topics included: Inventory: Deterministic Models, Inventory: Stochastic Models, Push v. Pull Production Control Systems, Factory Physics, and Operations Scheduling. Modern aspects such as lean manufacturing are included in the context of the course. (Prerequisites: ISEE-301 and (STAT-251 or MATH-251) or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ISEE-499
Co-op (summer)
One semester of paid work experience in industrial engineering. (Prerequisites: ISEE-120 and EGEN-99 and students in the ISEE-BS program.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
ISEE-510
Systems Simulation
Computer-based simulation of dynamic and stochastic systems. Simulation modeling and analysis methods are the focus of this course. A high-level simulation language such as Simio, ARENA, etc., will be used to model systems and examine system performance. Model validation, design of simulation experiments, and random number generation will be introduced. (Prerequisites: ISEE-200 and ISEE-301 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-560
Applied Statistical Quality Control
An applied approach to statistical quality control utilizing theoretical tools acquired in other math and statistics courses. Heavy emphasis on understanding and applying statistical analysis methods in real-world quality control situations in engineering. Topics include process capability analysis, acceptance sampling, hypothesis testing and control charts. Contemporary topics such as six-sigma are included within the context of the course. (Prerequisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course and students in ISEE-BS or ISEE-MN or ENGMGT-MN programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ISEE-752
Decision Analysis
This course presents the primary concepts of decision analysis. Topics important to the practical assessment of probability and preference information needed to implement decision analysis are considered. Decision models represented by a sequence of interrelated decisions, stochastic processes, and multiple criteria are also addressed. We cover EMV and Non-EMV decision-making concepts. Finally, the organizational use of decision analysis and its application in real-world case studies is presented. (Prerequisites: ISEE-325 or MATH-251 or STAT-205 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or MCEE-205 or equivalent course or students in ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, ENGMGT-ME, or MIE-PHD programs) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ISEE-795
Graduate Seminar*
This class introduces students to state of the art research and research methods in industrial, systems, and sustainable engineering. Presentations include off campus speakers and students/faculty presentations on current research under way in the department. (This course is restricted to students in ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS or ISEE BS/MS.) Seminar 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
Professional Electives
9
 
Open Electives
9
 
General Education – Immersion 1, 2
6
Fifth Year
ISEE-497
Multidisciplinary Senior Design I
This is the first in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. This first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. The second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: ISEE-323 and ISEE-330 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: ISEE-350 and ISEE-420 and ISEE-510 and ISEE-560 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
ISEE-498
Multidisciplinary Senior Design II
This is the second in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. The first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. This second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: ISEE-497 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-750
Systems and Project Management
This course ensures progress toward objectives, proper deployment and conservation of human and financial resources, and achievement of cost and schedule targets. The focus of the course is on the utilization of a diverse set of project management methods and tools. Topics include strategic project management, project and organization learning, chartering, adaptive project management methodologies, structuring of performance measures and metrics, technical teams and project management, risk management, and process control. Course delivery consists of lectures, speakers, case studies, and experience sharing, and reinforces collaborative project-based learning and continuous improvement. (Prerequisites: ISEE-350 or equivalent course or students in ISEE BS/MS, ISEE BS/ME, ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, ENGMGT-ME, PRODDEV-MS, MFLEAD-MS, or MIE-PHD programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ISEE-773
Engineering Value Creation
This course focuses on the role of engineering in value creation. In particular, the effective integration of engineering activities for the transformation of novel ideas and technologies into marketable products and services. Topics include value engineering and value analysis, the engineering value chain, the innovation process, engineering sustainable value, and the technology development and management process. (Co-requisites: ISEE-771 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MGMT-740
Leading Teams in Organizations
This course examines why people behave as they do in organizations and what managers can do to improve organizational performance by influencing people's behavior. Students will learn a number of frameworks for diagnosing and dealing with managerial challenges dynamics at the individual, group and organizational level. Topics include leadership, motivation, team building, conflict, organizational change, cultures, decision making, and ethical leadership. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
Choose one of the following:
6
   ISEE-792
   Engineering Capstone plus 1 additional Graduate KGCOE or SCB Elective
Students must investigate a discipline-related topic in a field related to industrial and systems engineering, engineering management, sustainable engineering, product development, or manufacturing leadership. The general intent of the engineering capstone is to demonstrate the students' knowledge of the integrative aspects of a particular area. The capstone should draw upon skills and knowledge acquired in the program. (This course is restricted to students in ISEE-MS, ENGMGT-ME, SUSTAIN-MS, PRODDEV-MS, MFLEAD-MS or the ISEE BS/MS programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
 
   ISEE-794
   Leadership Capstone plus 2 additional Graduate KGCOE or SCB Electives†
For students enrolled in the BS/ME dual degree program. Student must either: 1) serve as a team leader for the multidisciplinary senior design project, where they must apply leadership, project management, and system engineering skills to the solution of unstructured, open-ended, multi-disciplinary real-world engineering problems, or 2) demonstrate leadership through the investigation of a discipline-related topic. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Seminar (Fall, Spring).
 
   ISEE-788
   Project with Paper plus 1 additional Graduate KGCOE or SCB elective
This course is used by students as a capstone experience. The student must demonstrate an acquired competence in a topic that is chosen in conference with a faculty advisor. The work may involve a research and/or design project with demonstration of acquired knowledge. A written paper and an oral presentation of the work are required. Project 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
 
Graduate KGCOE or SCB Elective
3
 
General Education – Immersion 3
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
150

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI-PR) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

*ISEE-795 Graduate Seminar is prescribed for students taking the Thesis option and is to be taken in both the fall and spring semester.

† At least one of these Graduate Electives must be KGCOE.

Industrial Engineering, BS degree/Science, Technology and Public Policy, MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CHMG-131
General Chemistry for Engineers (General Education)
This rigorous course is primarily for, but not limited to, engineering students. Topics include an introduction to some basic concepts in chemistry, stoichiometry, First Law of Thermodynamics, thermochemistry, electronic theory of composition and structure, and chemical bonding. The lecture is supported by workshop-style problem sessions. Offered in traditional and online format. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-120
Fundamentals of Industrial Engineering
This course introduces students to industrial engineering and provides students with foundational tools used in the profession. The course is intended to prepare students for their first co-op experience in industrial engineering by exposing them to tools and concepts that are often encountered during early co-op assignments. The course covers specific tools and their applications, including systems design and the integration. The course uses a combination of lecture and laboratory activities. Projects and group exercises will be used to cover hands-on applications and problem-solving related to topics covered in lectures. (This class is restricted to ISEE-BS, ENGRX-UND, or ISEEDU Major students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-140
Materials Processing
A study of the application of machine tools and fabrication processes to engineering materials in the manufacture of products. Processes covered include cutting, molding, casting, forming, powder metallurgy, solid modeling, engineering drawing, and welding. Students make a project in the lab portion of the course. (This class is restricted to ISEE-BS, ENGRX-UND, or ISEEDU Major students.) Lab 1, Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MATH-181
Calculus I (General Education – Mathematical Perspective A)
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals. (Prerequisites: MATH-111 or (NMTH-220 and NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275) or equivalent courses with a minimum grade of B-, or a score of at least 60% on the RIT Mathematics Placement Exam. Co-requisites: MATH-181R or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
MATH-182
Calculus II (General Education – Mathematical Perspective B)
This is the second in a two-course sequence. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or MATH-181A or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
PHYS-211
University Physics I (General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective)
This is a course in calculus-based physics for science and engineering majors. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton's Laws, gravitation, work and energy, momentum and impulse, conservation laws, systems of particles, rotational motion, static equilibrium, mechanical oscillations and waves, and data presentation/analysis. The course is taught in a workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: MATH-182 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. (This class is restricted to incoming 1st year or global campus students.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
 
General Education – First-Year Writing (WI)
3
 
General Education – Elective
3
Second Year
ISEE-200
Computing for Engineers (General Education)
This course aims to help undergraduate students in understanding the latest software engineering techniques and their applications in the context of industrial and systems engineering. The topics of this course include the fundamental concepts and applications of computer programming, software engineering, computational problem solving, and statistical techniques for data mining and analytics. (This class is restricted to ISEE-BS, ENGRX-UND, or ISEEDU Major students.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ISEE-325
Engineering Statistics and Design of Experiments
This course covers statistics for use in engineering as well as the primary concepts of experimental design. The first portion of the course will cover: Point estimation; hypothesis testing and confidence intervals; one- and two-sample inference. The remainder of the class will be spent on concepts of design and analysis of experiments. Lectures and assignments will incorporate real-world science and engineering examples, including studies found in the literature. (Prerequisites: STAT-251 or MATH-251 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-345
Engineering Economy
Time value of money, methods of comparing alternatives, depreciation and depletion, income tax consideration and capital budgeting. Cannot be used as a professional elective for ISE majors. Course provides a foundation for engineers to effectively analyze engineering projects with respect to financial considerations. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
MATH-221
Multivariable and Vector Calculus (General Education)
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes a study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, Stokes' Theorem, Green's Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-219. (Prerequisite: C- or better MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
4
MATH-233
Linear Systems and Differential Equations (General Education)
This is an introductory course in linear algebra and ordinary differential equations in which a scientific computing package is used to clarify mathematical concepts, visualize problems, and work with large systems. The course covers matrix algebra, the basic notions and techniques of ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients, and the physical situation in which they arise. (Prerequisites: MATH-172 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A and students in CHEM-BS or CHEM-BS/MS or ISEE-BS programs.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
4
MATH-251
Probability and Statistics  (General Education)
This course introduces sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability and independence, distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions (discrete and continuous), the central limit theorem, descriptive statistics, interval estimation, and applications of probability and statistics to real-world problems. A statistical package such as Minitab or R is used for data analysis and statistical applications. (Prerequisites: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH 182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
MECE-200
Fundamentals of Mechanics
Statics: equilibrium, the principle of transmissibility of forces, couples, centroids, trusses and friction. Introduction to strength of materials: axial stresses and strains, statically indeterminate problems, torsion and bending. Dynamics: dynamics of particles and rigid bodies with an introduction to kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies, work, energy, impulse momentum and mechanical vibrations. Emphasis is on problem solving. For students majoring in industrial and systems engineering. (Prerequisites: PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or 1017-312 or 1017-312T or 1017-389 or PHYS-206 and PHYS-207 or equivalent course.and restricted to students in ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS programs.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
4
PHYS-212
University Physics II (General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective)
This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: (PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or PHYS-216) or (MECE-102, MECE-103 and MECE-205) and (MATH-182 or MATH-172 or MATH-182A) or equivalent courses. Grades of C- or better are required in all prerequisite courses.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
Third Year
ISEE-301
Operations Research
An introduction to optimization through mathematical programming and stochastic modeling techniques. Course topics include linear programming, transportation and assignment algorithms, Markov Chain queuing and their application on problems in manufacturing, health care, financial systems, supply chain, and other engineering disciplines. Special attention is placed on sensitivity analysis and the need of optimization in decision-making. The course is delivered through lectures and a weekly laboratory where students learn to use state-of-the-art software packages for modeling large discrete optimization problems. (Prerequisites: MATH-233 or (MATH-231 and MATH-241) or equivalent course.) Lab 2, Lecture 3 (Spring).
4
ISEE-304
Fundamentals of Materials Science
This course provides the student with an overview of structure, properties, and processing of metals, polymers, ceramics and composites. There is a particular emphasis on understanding of materials and the relative impact on manufacturing optimization throughput and quality as it relates to Industrial Engineering. This course is delivered through lectures and a weekly laboratory. (This course is restricted to ISEE-BS Major students.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Spring).
3
ISEE-323
Systems and Facilities Planning
A basic course in quantitative models on layout, material handling, and warehousing. Topics include product/process analysis, flow of materials, material handling systems, warehousing and layout design. A computer-aided layout design package is used. (Corequisites: ISEE-301 or equivalent course.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Spring).
3
ISEE-330
Ergonomics and Human Factors (WI-PR)
This course covers the physical and cognitive aspects of human performance to enable students to design work places, procedures, products and processes that are consistent with human capabilities and limitations. Principles of physical work and human anthropometry are studied to enable the student to systematically design work places, processes, and systems that are consistent with human capabilities and limitations. In addition, the human information processing capabilities are studied, which includes the human sensory, memory, attention and cognitive processes; display and control design principles; as well as human computer interface design. (Co-requisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
4
ISEE-350
Engineering Management
Development of the fundamental engineering management principles of industrial enterprise, including an introduction to project management. Emphasis is on project management and the development of the project management plan. At least one term of previous co-op experience is required. (Prerequisite: BIME-499 or MECE-499 or ISEE-499 or CHME-499 or EEEE-499 or CMPE-499 or MCEE-499 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ISEE-499
Co-op (fall, summer)
One semester of paid work experience in industrial engineering. (Prerequisites: ISEE-120 and EGEN-99 and students in the ISEE-BS program.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
Fourth Year
ISEE-420
Production Planning/Scheduling
A first course in mathematical modeling of production-inventory systems. Topics included: Inventory: Deterministic Models, Inventory: Stochastic Models, Push v. Pull Production Control Systems, Factory Physics, and Operations Scheduling. Modern aspects such as lean manufacturing are included in the context of the course. (Prerequisites: ISEE-301 and (STAT-251 or MATH-251) or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ISEE-560
Applied Statistical Quality Control
An applied approach to statistical quality control utilizing theoretical tools acquired in other math and statistics courses. Heavy emphasis on understanding and applying statistical analysis methods in real-world quality control situations in engineering. Topics include process capability analysis, acceptance sampling, hypothesis testing and control charts. Contemporary topics such as six-sigma are included within the context of the course. (Prerequisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course and students in ISEE-BS or ISEE-MN or ENGMGT-MN programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ISEE-499
Co-op (summer)
One semester of paid work experience in industrial engineering. (Prerequisites: ISEE-120 and EGEN-99 and students in the ISEE-BS program.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
ISEE-510
Systems Simulation
Computer-based simulation of dynamic and stochastic systems. Simulation modeling and analysis methods are the focus of this course. A high-level simulation language such as Simio, ARENA, etc., will be used to model systems and examine system performance. Model validation, design of simulation experiments, and random number generation will be introduced. (Prerequisites: ISEE-200 and ISEE-301 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
PUBL-701
Graduate Policy Analysis
This course provides graduate students with necessary tools to help them become effective policy analysts. The course places particular emphasis on understanding the policy process, the different approaches to policy analysis, and the application of quantitative and qualitative methods for evaluating public policies. Students will apply these tools to contemporary public policy decision making at the local, state, federal, and international levels. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
PUBL-702
Graduate Decision Analysis
This course provides students with an introduction to decision science and analysis. The course focuses on several important tools for making good decisions, including decision trees, including forecasting, risk analysis, and multi-attribute decision making. Students will apply these tools to contemporary public policy decision making at the local, state, federal, and international levels. Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
 
General Education – Immersion 1, 2, 3
9
 
Professional Elective
3
 
Professional Elective/Public Policy Elective
3
Fifth Year
ISEE-497
Multidisciplinary Senior Design I
This is the first in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. This first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. The second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: ISEE-323 and ISEE-330 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: ISEE-350 and ISEE-420 and ISEE-510 and ISEE-560 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
ISEE-498
Multidisciplinary Senior Design II
This is the second in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. The first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. This second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: ISEE-497 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-561
Linear Regression Analysis
In any system where parameters of interest change, it may be of interest to examine the effects that some variables exert (or appear to exert) on others. "Regression analysis" actually describes a variety of data analysis techniques that can be used to describe the interrelationships among such variables. In this course we will examine in detail the use of one popular analytic technique: least squares linear regression. Cases illustrating the use of regression techniques in engineering applications will be developed and analyzed throughout the course. (Prerequisites: (MATH-233 or (MATH-231 and MATH-241)) and (ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252) or equivalent courses and students in ISEE-BS programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
PUBL-700
Readings in Public Policy
An in-depth inquiry into key contemporary public policy issues. Students will be exposed to a wide range of important public policy texts, and will learn how to write a literature review in a policy area of their choosing. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Seminar (Fall).
3
PUBL-703
Evaluation and Research Design
The focus of this course is on evaluation of program outcomes and research design. Students will explore the questions and methodologies associated with meeting programmatic outcomes, secondary or unanticipated effects, and an analysis of alternative means for achieving program outcomes. Critique of evaluation research methodologies will also be considered. Seminar (Spring).
3
STSO-710
Graduate Science and Technology Policy Seminar
Examines how federal and international policies are developed to influence research and development, innovation, and the transfer of technology in the United States and other selected nations. Students in the course will apply basic policy skills, concepts, and methods to contemporary science and technology policy topics. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Seminar (Fall).
3
 
Open Electives
6
 
Public Policy Electives
3
 
Professional Elective/Public Policy Elective
3
Choose one of the following:
6
   PUBL-785
   Capstone Experience
The Public Policy Capstone Experience serves as a culminating experience for those MS in Science, Technology and Public Policy students who chose this option in the Public Policy Department. Over the course of the semester, students will have the opportunity to investigate and address contemporary topics in science and technology policy using analytic skills and theoretical knowledge learned over the course of their MS degree. Project 1 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
   PUBL-790
   Public Policy Thesis
The master's thesis in science, technology, and public policy requires the student to select a thesis topic, advisor and committee; prepare a written thesis proposal for approval by the faculty; present and defend the thesis before a thesis committee; and submit a bound copy of the thesis to the library and to the program chair. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Thesis 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
   PUBL-798
   Comprehensive Exam plus 2 Graduate Electives
 
Total Semester Credit Hours
150

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI-PR) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

The industrial engineering BS/Industrial and systems engineering ME is no longer accepting applications for admission.

Industrial Engineering, BS degree/Industrial and Systems Engineering, ME degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CHMG-131
General Chemistry for Engineers (General Education – Elective)
This rigorous course is primarily for, but not limited to, engineering students. Topics include an introduction to some basic concepts in chemistry, stoichiometry, First Law of Thermodynamics, thermochemistry, electronic theory of composition and structure, and chemical bonding. The lecture is supported by workshop-style problem sessions. Offered in traditional and online format. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-120
Fundamentals of Industrial Engineering
This course introduces students to industrial engineering and provides students with foundational tools used in the profession. The course is intended to prepare students for their first co-op experience in industrial engineering by exposing them to tools and concepts that are often encountered during early co-op assignments. The course covers specific tools and their applications, including systems design and the integration. The course uses a combination of lecture and laboratory activities. Projects and group exercises will be used to cover hands-on applications and problem-solving related to topics covered in lectures. (This class is restricted to ISEE-BS, ENGRX-UND, or ISEEDU Major students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-140
Materials Processing
A study of the application of machine tools and fabrication processes to engineering materials in the manufacture of products. Processes covered include cutting, molding, casting, forming, powder metallurgy, solid modeling, engineering drawing, and welding. Students make a project in the lab portion of the course. (This class is restricted to ISEE-BS, ENGRX-UND, or ISEEDU Major students.) Lab 1, Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MATH-181
Project-Based Calculus I (General Education – Mathematical Perspective A)
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals. (Prerequisites: MATH-111 or (NMTH-220 and NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275) or equivalent courses with a minimum grade of B-, or a score of at least 60% on the RIT Mathematics Placement Exam. Co-requisites: MATH-181R or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
MATH-182
Project-Based Calculus II (General Education – Mathematical Perspective B)
This is the second in a two-course sequence. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or MATH-181A or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
PHYS-211
University Physics I (General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective)
This is a course in calculus-based physics for science and engineering majors. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton's Laws, gravitation, work and energy, momentum and impulse, conservation laws, systems of particles, rotational motion, static equilibrium, mechanical oscillations and waves, and data presentation/analysis. The course is taught in a workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: MATH-182 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
YOPS-010
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. (This class is restricted to incoming 1st year or global campus students.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
 
General Education – First-Year Writing (WI)
3
 
General Education – Elective
3
Second Year
ISEE-200
Computing for Engineers (General Education – Elective)
This course aims to help undergraduate students in understanding the latest software engineering techniques and their applications in the context of industrial and systems engineering. The topics of this course include the fundamental concepts and applications of computer programming, software engineering, computational problem solving, and statistical techniques for data mining and analytics. (This class is restricted to ISEE-BS, ENGRX-UND, or ISEEDU Major students.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ISEE-325
Engineering Statistics and Design of Experiments
This course covers statistics for use in engineering as well as the primary concepts of experimental design. The first portion of the course will cover: Point estimation; hypothesis testing and confidence intervals; one- and two-sample inference. The remainder of the class will be spent on concepts of design and analysis of experiments. Lectures and assignments will incorporate real-world science and engineering examples, including studies found in the literature. (Prerequisites: STAT-251 or MATH-251 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-345
Engineering Economy
Time value of money, methods of comparing alternatives, depreciation and depletion, income tax consideration and capital budgeting. Cannot be used as a professional elective for ISE majors. Course provides a foundation for engineers to effectively analyze engineering projects with respect to financial considerations. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-499
Co-op (summer)
One semester of paid work experience in industrial engineering. (Prerequisites: ISEE-120 and EGEN-99 and students in the ISEE-BS program.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
MATH-221
Multivariable and Vector Calculus (General Education – Elective)
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes a study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, Stokes' Theorem, Green's Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-219. (Prerequisite: C- or better MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
4
MATH-233
Linear Systems and Differential Equations (General Education – Elective)
This is an introductory course in linear algebra and ordinary differential equations in which a scientific computing package is used to clarify mathematical concepts, visualize problems, and work with large systems. The course covers matrix algebra, the basic notions and techniques of ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients, and the physical situation in which they arise. (Prerequisites: MATH-172 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A and students in CHEM-BS or CHEM-BS/MS or ISEE-BS programs.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
4
MATH-251
Probability and Statistics (General Education – Elective)
This course introduces sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability and independence, distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions (discrete and continuous), the central limit theorem, descriptive statistics, interval estimation, and applications of probability and statistics to real-world problems. A statistical package such as Minitab or R is used for data analysis and statistical applications. (Prerequisites: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH 182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
MECE-200
Fundamentals of Mechanics
Statics: equilibrium, the principle of transmissibility of forces, couples, centroids, trusses and friction. Introduction to strength of materials: axial stresses and strains, statically indeterminate problems, torsion and bending. Dynamics: dynamics of particles and rigid bodies with an introduction to kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies, work, energy, impulse momentum and mechanical vibrations. Emphasis is on problem solving. For students majoring in industrial and systems engineering. (Prerequisites: PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or 1017-312 or 1017-312T or 1017-389 or PHYS-206 and PHYS-207 or equivalent course.and restricted to students in ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS programs.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
4
PHYS-212
University Physics II (General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective)
This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: (PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or PHYS-216) or (MECE-102, MECE-103 and MECE-205) and (MATH-182 or MATH-172 or MATH-182A) or equivalent courses. Grades of C- or better are required in all prerequisite courses.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
Third Year
ISEE-301
Operations Research
An introduction to optimization through mathematical programming and stochastic modeling techniques. Course topics include linear programming, transportation and assignment algorithms, Markov Chain queuing and their application on problems in manufacturing, health care, financial systems, supply chain, and other engineering disciplines. Special attention is placed on sensitivity analysis and the need of optimization in decision-making. The course is delivered through lectures and a weekly laboratory where students learn to use state-of-the-art software packages for modeling large discrete optimization problems. (Prerequisites: MATH-233 or (MATH-231 and MATH-241) or equivalent course.) Lab 2, Lecture 3 (Spring).
4
ISEE-323
Systems and Facilities Planning
A basic course in quantitative models on layout, material handling, and warehousing. Topics include product/process analysis, flow of materials, material handling systems, warehousing and layout design. A computer-aided layout design package is used. (Corequisites: ISEE-301 or equivalent course.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Spring).
3
ISEE-330
Ergonomics and Human Factors (WI-PR)
This course covers the physical and cognitive aspects of human performance to enable students to design work places, procedures, products and processes that are consistent with human capabilities and limitations. Principles of physical work and human anthropometry are studied to enable the student to systematically design work places, processes, and systems that are consistent with human capabilities and limitations. In addition, the human information processing capabilities are studied, which includes the human sensory, memory, attention and cognitive processes; display and control design principles; as well as human computer interface design. (Co-requisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
4
ISEE-350
Engineering Management
Development of the fundamental engineering management principles of industrial enterprise, including an introduction to project management. Emphasis is on project management and the development of the project management plan. At least one term of previous co-op experience is required. (Prerequisite: BIME-499 or MECE-499 or ISEE-499 or CHME-499 or EEEE-499 or CMPE-499 or MCEE-499 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ISEE-499
Co-op (fall, summer)
One semester of paid work experience in industrial engineering. (Prerequisites: ISEE-120 and EGEN-99 and students in the ISEE-BS program.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
MECE-304
Fundamentals of Materials Science
2
MECE-306
Materials Science and Applications Laboratory
A required laboratory course taken concurrently with MECE-304 Fundamentals of Materials Science or MECE-305 Materials Science with Applications. Students investigate the effects of the structure, alloying, and processing of materials on their mechanical properties. Students are also introduced to standardized testing methods and effective, professional, report writing. (This course is restricted to students in MECE-BS or MECEDU-BS or MECE-MN or ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS or ENGRX-UND students.) Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).
1
Fourth Year
ISEE-420
Production Planning/Scheduling
A first course in mathematical modeling of production-inventory systems. Topics included: Inventory: Deterministic Models, Inventory: Stochastic Models, Push v. Pull Production Control Systems, Factory Physics, and Operations Scheduling. Modern aspects such as lean manufacturing are included in the context of the course. (Prerequisites: ISEE-301 and (STAT-251 or MATH-251) or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ISEE-499
Co-op (summer)
One semester of paid work experience in industrial engineering. (Prerequisites: ISEE-120 and EGEN-99 and students in the ISEE-BS program.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
ISEE-510
Systems Simulation
Computer-based simulation of dynamic and stochastic systems. Simulation modeling and analysis methods are the focus of this course. A high-level simulation language such as Simio, ARENA, etc., will be used to model systems and examine system performance. Model validation, design of simulation experiments, and random number generation will be introduced. (Prerequisites: ISEE-200 and ISEE-301 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-560
Applied Statistical Quality Control
An applied approach to statistical quality control utilizing theoretical tools acquired in other math and statistics courses. Heavy emphasis on understanding and applying statistical analysis methods in real-world quality control situations in engineering. Topics include process capability analysis, acceptance sampling, hypothesis testing and control charts. Contemporary topics such as six-sigma are included within the context of the course. (Prerequisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course and students in ISEE-BS or ISEE-MN or ENGMGT-MN programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ISEE-760
Design of Experiments
This course presents an in-depth study of the primary concepts of experimental design. Its applied approach uses theoretical tools acquired in other mathematics and statistics courses. Emphasis is placed on the role of replication and randomization in experimentation. Numerous designs and design strategies are reviewed and implications on data analysis are discussed. Topics include: consideration of type 1 and type 2 errors in experimentation, sample size determination, completely randomized designs, randomized complete block designs, blocking and confounding in experiments, Latin square and Graeco Latin square designs, general factorial designs, the 2k factorial design system, the 3k factorial design system, fractional factorial designs, Taguchi experimentation. (Prerequisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course or students in ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, ENGMGT-ME, or MIE-PHD programs.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
 
Professional Electives
9
 
Open Electives
9
 
General Education – Immersion 1, 2
6
Fifth Year
ISEE-497
Multidisciplinary Senior Design I
This is the first in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. This first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. The second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: ISEE-323 and ISEE-330 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: ISEE-350 and ISEE-420 and ISEE-510 and ISEE-560 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
ISEE-498
Multidisciplinary Senior Design II
This is the second in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. The first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. This second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: ISEE-497 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-561
Linear Regression Analysis
In any system where parameters of interest change, it may be of interest to examine the effects that some variables exert (or appear to exert) on others. "Regression analysis" actually describes a variety of data analysis techniques that can be used to describe the interrelationships among such variables. In this course we will examine in detail the use of one popular analytic technique: least squares linear regression. Cases illustrating the use of regression techniques in engineering applications will be developed and analyzed throughout the course. (Prerequisites: (MATH-233 or (MATH-231 and MATH-241)) and (ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252) or equivalent courses and students in ISEE-BS programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ISEE-771
Engineering of Systems I
The engineering of a system is focused on the identification of value and the value chain, requirements management and engineering, understanding the limitations of current systems, the development of the overall concept, and continually improving the robustness of the defined solution. EOS I & II is a 2-semester course sequence focused on the creation of systems that generate value for both the customer and the enterprise. Through systematic analysis and synthesis methods, novel solutions to problems are proposed and selected. This first course in the sequence focuses on the definition of the system requirements by systematic analysis of the existing problems, issues and solutions, to create an improved vision for a new system. Based on this new vision, new high-level solutions will be identified and selected for (hypothetical) further development. The focus is to learn systems engineering through a focus on an actual artifact (This course is restricted to students in the ISEE BS/MS, ISEE BS/ME, ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, PRODDEV-MS, MFLEAD-MS, ENGMGT-ME, or MIE-PHD programs or those with 5th year standing in ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
Choose one of the following:
3
   ISEE-792
   Engineering Capstone
Students must investigate a discipline-related topic in a field related to industrial and systems engineering, engineering management, sustainable engineering, product development, or manufacturing leadership. The general intent of the engineering capstone is to demonstrate the students' knowledge of the integrative aspects of a particular area. The capstone should draw upon skills and knowledge acquired in the program. (This course is restricted to students in ISEE-MS, ENGMGT-ME, SUSTAIN-MS, PRODDEV-MS, MFLEAD-MS or the ISEE BS/MS programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
 
   ISEE-794
   Leadership Capstone plus 1 additional Graduate Elective
For students enrolled in the BS/ME dual degree program. Student must either: 1) serve as a team leader for the multidisciplinary senior design project, where they must apply leadership, project management, and system engineering skills to the solution of unstructured, open-ended, multi-disciplinary real-world engineering problems, or 2) demonstrate leadership through the investigation of a discipline-related topic. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Seminar (Fall, Spring).
 
 
Graduate Electives
12
 
General Education – Immersion 3
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
150

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI-PR) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Industrial Engineering, BS degree/Industrial and Systems Engineering, MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CHMG-131
General Chemistry for Engineers (General Education – Elective)
This rigorous course is primarily for, but not limited to, engineering students. Topics include an introduction to some basic concepts in chemistry, stoichiometry, First Law of Thermodynamics, thermochemistry, electronic theory of composition and structure, and chemical bonding. The lecture is supported by workshop-style problem sessions. Offered in traditional and online format. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-120
Fundamentals of Industrial Engineering
This course introduces students to industrial engineering and provides students with foundational tools used in the profession. The course is intended to prepare students for their first co-op experience in industrial engineering by exposing them to tools and concepts that are often encountered during early co-op assignments. The course covers specific tools and their applications, including systems design and the integration. The course uses a combination of lecture and laboratory activities. Projects and group exercises will be used to cover hands-on applications and problem-solving related to topics covered in lectures. (This class is restricted to ISEE-BS, ENGRX-UND, or ISEEDU Major students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-140
Materials Processing
A study of the application of machine tools and fabrication processes to engineering materials in the manufacture of products. Processes covered include cutting, molding, casting, forming, powder metallurgy, solid modeling, engineering drawing, and welding. Students make a project in the lab portion of the course. (This class is restricted to ISEE-BS, ENGRX-UND, or ISEEDU Major students.) Lab 1, Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MATH-181
Project-Based Calculus I (General Education – Mathematical Perspective A)
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals. (Prerequisites: MATH-111 or (NMTH-220 and NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275) or equivalent courses with a minimum grade of B-, or a score of at least 60% on the RIT Mathematics Placement Exam. Co-requisites: MATH-181R or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
MATH-182
Project-Based Calculus II (General Education – Mathematical Perspective B)
This is the second in a two-course sequence. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or MATH-181A or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
PHYS-211
University Physics I (General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective)
This is a course in calculus-based physics for science and engineering majors. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton's Laws, gravitation, work and energy, momentum and impulse, conservation laws, systems of particles, rotational motion, static equilibrium, mechanical oscillations and waves, and data presentation/analysis. The course is taught in a workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: MATH-182 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
YOPS-010
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. (This class is restricted to incoming 1st year or global campus students.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
 
General Education – First-Year Writing (WI)
3
 
General Education – Elective
3
Second Year
EGEN-99
Engineering Co-Op Preparation
This course will prepare students, who are entering their second year of study, for both the job search and employment in the field of engineering. Students will learn strategies for conducting a successful job search, including the preparation of resumes and cover letters; behavioral interviewing techniques and effective use of social media in the application process. Professional and ethical responsibilities during the job search and for co-op and subsequent professional experiences will be discussed. (This course is restricted to students in Kate Gleason College of Engineering with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
ISEE-200
Computing for Engineers (General Education – Elective)
This course aims to help undergraduate students in understanding the latest software engineering techniques and their applications in the context of industrial and systems engineering. The topics of this course include the fundamental concepts and applications of computer programming, software engineering, computational problem solving, and statistical techniques for data mining and analytics. (This class is restricted to ISEE-BS, ENGRX-UND, or ISEEDU Major students.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ISEE-325
Engineering Statistics and Design of Experiments
This course covers statistics for use in engineering as well as the primary concepts of experimental design. The first portion of the course will cover: Point estimation; hypothesis testing and confidence intervals; one- and two-sample inference. The remainder of the class will be spent on concepts of design and analysis of experiments. Lectures and assignments will incorporate real-world science and engineering examples, including studies found in the literature. (Prerequisites: STAT-251 or MATH-251 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-345
Engineering Economy
Time value of money, methods of comparing alternatives, depreciation and depletion, income tax consideration and capital budgeting. Cannot be used as a professional elective for ISE majors. Course provides a foundation for engineers to effectively analyze engineering projects with respect to financial considerations. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-499
Co-op (summer)
One semester of paid work experience in industrial engineering. (Prerequisites: ISEE-120 and EGEN-99 and students in the ISEE-BS program.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
MATH-221
Multivariable and Vector Calculus (General Education – Elective)
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes a study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, Stokes' Theorem, Green's Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-219. (Prerequisite: C- or better MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
4
MATH-233
Linear Systems and Differential Equations (General Education – Elective)
This is an introductory course in linear algebra and ordinary differential equations in which a scientific computing package is used to clarify mathematical concepts, visualize problems, and work with large systems. The course covers matrix algebra, the basic notions and techniques of ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients, and the physical situation in which they arise. (Prerequisites: MATH-172 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A and students in CHEM-BS or CHEM-BS/MS or ISEE-BS programs.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
4
MATH-251
Probability and Statistics (General Education – Elective)
This course introduces sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability and independence, distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions (discrete and continuous), the central limit theorem, descriptive statistics, interval estimation, and applications of probability and statistics to real-world problems. A statistical package such as Minitab or R is used for data analysis and statistical applications. (Prerequisites: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH 182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
MECE-200
Fundamentals of Mechanics
Statics: equilibrium, the principle of transmissibility of forces, couples, centroids, trusses and friction. Introduction to strength of materials: axial stresses and strains, statically indeterminate problems, torsion and bending. Dynamics: dynamics of particles and rigid bodies with an introduction to kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies, work, energy, impulse momentum and mechanical vibrations. Emphasis is on problem solving. For students majoring in industrial and systems engineering. (Prerequisites: PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or 1017-312 or 1017-312T or 1017-389 or PHYS-206 and PHYS-207 or equivalent course.and restricted to students in ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS programs.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
4
PHYS-212
University Physics II (General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective)
This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: (PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or PHYS-216) or (MECE-102, MECE-103 and MECE-205) and (MATH-182 or MATH-172 or MATH-182A) or equivalent courses. Grades of C- or better are required in all prerequisite courses.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
Third Year
ISEE-301
Operations Research
An introduction to optimization through mathematical programming and stochastic modeling techniques. Course topics include linear programming, transportation and assignment algorithms, Markov Chain queuing and their application on problems in manufacturing, health care, financial systems, supply chain, and other engineering disciplines. Special attention is placed on sensitivity analysis and the need of optimization in decision-making. The course is delivered through lectures and a weekly laboratory where students learn to use state-of-the-art software packages for modeling large discrete optimization problems. (Prerequisites: MATH-233 or (MATH-231 and MATH-241) or equivalent course.) Lab 2, Lecture 3 (Spring).
4
ISEE-323
Systems and Facilities Planning
A basic course in quantitative models on layout, material handling, and warehousing. Topics include product/process analysis, flow of materials, material handling systems, warehousing and layout design. A computer-aided layout design package is used. (Corequisites: ISEE-301 or equivalent course.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Spring).
3
ISEE-330
Ergonomics and Human Factors (WI-PR)
This course covers the physical and cognitive aspects of human performance to enable students to design work places, procedures, products and processes that are consistent with human capabilities and limitations. Principles of physical work and human anthropometry are studied to enable the student to systematically design work places, processes, and systems that are consistent with human capabilities and limitations. In addition, the human information processing capabilities are studied, which includes the human sensory, memory, attention and cognitive processes; display and control design principles; as well as human computer interface design. (Co-requisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
4
ISEE-350
Engineering Management
Development of the fundamental engineering management principles of industrial enterprise, including an introduction to project management. Emphasis is on project management and the development of the project management plan. At least one term of previous co-op experience is required. (Prerequisite: BIME-499 or MECE-499 or ISEE-499 or CHME-499 or EEEE-499 or CMPE-499 or MCEE-499 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ISEE-499
Co-op (fall, summer)
One semester of paid work experience in industrial engineering. (Prerequisites: ISEE-120 and EGEN-99 and students in the ISEE-BS program.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
ISEE-304
Fundamentals of Materials Science
This course provides the student with an overview of structure, properties, and processing of metals, polymers, ceramics and composites. There is a particular emphasis on understanding of materials and the relative impact on manufacturing optimization throughput and quality as it relates to Industrial Engineering. This course is delivered through lectures and a weekly laboratory. (This course is restricted to ISEE-BS Major students.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Spring).
2
Fourth Year
ISEE-420
Production Planning/Scheduling
A first course in mathematical modeling of production-inventory systems. Topics included: Inventory: Deterministic Models, Inventory: Stochastic Models, Push v. Pull Production Control Systems, Factory Physics, and Operations Scheduling. Modern aspects such as lean manufacturing are included in the context of the course. (Prerequisites: ISEE-301 and (STAT-251 or MATH-251) or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ISEE-499
Co-op (summer)
One semester of paid work experience in industrial engineering. (Prerequisites: ISEE-120 and EGEN-99 and students in the ISEE-BS program.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
ISEE-510
Systems Simulation
Computer-based simulation of dynamic and stochastic systems. Simulation modeling and analysis methods are the focus of this course. A high-level simulation language such as Simio, ARENA, etc., will be used to model systems and examine system performance. Model validation, design of simulation experiments, and random number generation will be introduced. (Prerequisites: ISEE-200 and ISEE-301 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-560
Applied Statistical Quality Control
An applied approach to statistical quality control utilizing theoretical tools acquired in other math and statistics courses. Heavy emphasis on understanding and applying statistical analysis methods in real-world quality control situations in engineering. Topics include process capability analysis, acceptance sampling, hypothesis testing and control charts. Contemporary topics such as six-sigma are included within the context of the course. (Prerequisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course and students in ISEE-BS or ISEE-MN or ENGMGT-MN programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ISEE-760
Design of Experiments
This course presents an in-depth study of the primary concepts of experimental design. Its applied approach uses theoretical tools acquired in other mathematics and statistics courses. Emphasis is placed on the role of replication and randomization in experimentation. Numerous designs and design strategies are reviewed and implications on data analysis are discussed. Topics include: consideration of type 1 and type 2 errors in experimentation, sample size determination, completely randomized designs, randomized complete block designs, blocking and confounding in experiments, Latin square and Graeco Latin square designs, general factorial designs, the 2k factorial design system, the 3k factorial design system, fractional factorial designs, Taguchi experimentation. (Prerequisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course or students in ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, ENGMGT-ME, or MIE-PHD programs.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
 
Professional Electives
9
 
Open Electives
9
 
General Education – Immersion 1, 2
6
ISEE-795
Graduate Seminar (fall, spring)
This class introduces students to state of the art research and research methods in industrial, systems, and sustainable engineering. Presentations include off campus speakers and students/faculty presentations on current research under way in the department. (This course is restricted to students in ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS or ISEE BS/MS.) Seminar 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
Fifth Year
ISEE-497
Multidisciplinary Senior Design I
This is the first in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. This first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. The second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: ISEE-323 and ISEE-330 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: ISEE-350 and ISEE-420 and ISEE-510 and ISEE-560 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
ISEE-498
Multidisciplinary Senior Design II
This is the second in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. The first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. This second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: ISEE-497 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-561
Linear Regression Analysis
In any system where parameters of interest change, it may be of interest to examine the effects that some variables exert (or appear to exert) on others. "Regression analysis" actually describes a variety of data analysis techniques that can be used to describe the interrelationships among such variables. In this course we will examine in detail the use of one popular analytic technique: least squares linear regression. Cases illustrating the use of regression techniques in engineering applications will be developed and analyzed throughout the course. (Prerequisites: (MATH-233 or (MATH-231 and MATH-241)) and (ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252) or equivalent courses and students in ISEE-BS programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ISEE-771
Engineering of Systems I
The engineering of a system is focused on the identification of value and the value chain, requirements management and engineering, understanding the limitations of current systems, the development of the overall concept, and continually improving the robustness of the defined solution. EOS I & II is a 2-semester course sequence focused on the creation of systems that generate value for both the customer and the enterprise. Through systematic analysis and synthesis methods, novel solutions to problems are proposed and selected. This first course in the sequence focuses on the definition of the system requirements by systematic analysis of the existing problems, issues and solutions, to create an improved vision for a new system. Based on this new vision, new high-level solutions will be identified and selected for (hypothetical) further development. The focus is to learn systems engineering through a focus on an actual artifact (This course is restricted to students in the ISEE BS/MS, ISEE BS/ME, ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, PRODDEV-MS, MFLEAD-MS, ENGMGT-ME, or MIE-PHD programs or those with 5th year standing in ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
Choose one of the following:
6
   ISEE-792
   Engineering Capstone plus 1 additional Graduate Elective
Students must investigate a discipline-related topic in a field related to industrial and systems engineering, engineering management, sustainable engineering, product development, or manufacturing leadership. The general intent of the engineering capstone is to demonstrate the students' knowledge of the integrative aspects of a particular area. The capstone should draw upon skills and knowledge acquired in the program. (This course is restricted to students in ISEE-MS, ENGMGT-ME, SUSTAIN-MS, PRODDEV-MS, MFLEAD-MS or the ISEE BS/MS programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
 
   ISEE-788
   Project with Paper plus 1 additional Graduate Elective
This course is used by students as a capstone experience. The student must demonstrate an acquired competence in a topic that is chosen in conference with a faculty advisor. The work may involve a research and/or design project with demonstration of acquired knowledge. A written paper and an oral presentation of the work are required. Project 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
   ISEE-790
   Thesis
In conference with a faculty adviser, an independent engineering project or research problem is selected. The work may be of a theoretical and/or computational nature. A state-of-the-art literature search in the area is normally expected. A formal written thesis and an oral defense with a faculty thesis committee are required. Submission of bound copies of the thesis to the library and to the department and preparation of a written paper in a short format suitable for submission for publication in a refereed journal are also required. Approval of department head and faculty adviser needed to enroll. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Thesis (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
 
Graduate Electives
9
 
General Education – Immersion 3
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
150

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI-PR) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

The industrial engineering BS/sustainable engineering ME is no longer accepting applications for admission.

Industrial Engineering, BS degree/Sustainable Engineering, MS degree, typical course sequence

The combined accelerated bachelor's/master's degree in industrial engineering BS/sustainable engineering MS is no longer accepting applications for admission. This does not effect students who are currently enrolled in the dual degree or those who were pre-accepted to the dual degree program. program.

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CHMG-131
General Chemistry for Engineers (General Education – Elective)
This rigorous course is primarily for, but not limited to, engineering students. Topics include an introduction to some basic concepts in chemistry, stoichiometry, First Law of Thermodynamics, thermochemistry, electronic theory of composition and structure, and chemical bonding. The lecture is supported by workshop-style problem sessions. Offered in traditional and online format. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-120
Fundamentals of Industrial Engineering
This course introduces students to industrial engineering and provides students with foundational tools used in the profession. The course is intended to prepare students for their first co-op experience in industrial engineering by exposing them to tools and concepts that are often encountered during early co-op assignments. The course covers specific tools and their applications, including systems design and the integration. The course uses a combination of lecture and laboratory activities. Projects and group exercises will be used to cover hands-on applications and problem-solving related to topics covered in lectures. (This class is restricted to ISEE-BS, ENGRX-UND, or ISEEDU Major students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-140
Materials Processing
A study of the application of machine tools and fabrication processes to engineering materials in the manufacture of products. Processes covered include cutting, molding, casting, forming, powder metallurgy, solid modeling, engineering drawing, and welding. Students make a project in the lab portion of the course. (This class is restricted to ISEE-BS, ENGRX-UND, or ISEEDU Major students.) Lab 1, Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MATH-181
Project-Based Calculus I (General Education – Mathematical Perspective A)
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals. (Prerequisites: MATH-111 or (NMTH-220 and NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275) or equivalent courses with a minimum grade of B-, or a score of at least 60% on the RIT Mathematics Placement Exam. Co-requisites: MATH-181R or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
MATH-182
Project-Based Calculus II (General Education – Mathematical Perspective B)
This is the second in a two-course sequence. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or MATH-181A or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
PHYS-211
University Physics I (General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective)
This is a course in calculus-based physics for science and engineering majors. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton's Laws, gravitation, work and energy, momentum and impulse, conservation laws, systems of particles, rotational motion, static equilibrium, mechanical oscillations and waves, and data presentation/analysis. The course is taught in a workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: MATH-182 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
YOPS-010
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. (This class is restricted to incoming 1st year or global campus students.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
 
First-Year Writing (WI) (General Education)
3
 
General Education – Elective
3
Second Year
EGEN-99
Engineering Co-op Preparation
This course will prepare students, who are entering their second year of study, for both the job search and employment in the field of engineering. Students will learn strategies for conducting a successful job search, including the preparation of resumes and cover letters; behavioral interviewing techniques and effective use of social media in the application process. Professional and ethical responsibilities during the job search and for co-op and subsequent professional experiences will be discussed. (This course is restricted to students in Kate Gleason College of Engineering with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
ISEE-200
Computing for Engineers (General Education – Elective)
This course aims to help undergraduate students in understanding the latest software engineering techniques and their applications in the context of industrial and systems engineering. The topics of this course include the fundamental concepts and applications of computer programming, software engineering, computational problem solving, and statistical techniques for data mining and analytics. (This class is restricted to ISEE-BS, ENGRX-UND, or ISEEDU Major students.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ISEE-325
Engineering Statistics and Design of Experiments
This course covers statistics for use in engineering as well as the primary concepts of experimental design. The first portion of the course will cover: Point estimation; hypothesis testing and confidence intervals; one- and two-sample inference. The remainder of the class will be spent on concepts of design and analysis of experiments. Lectures and assignments will incorporate real-world science and engineering examples, including studies found in the literature. (Prerequisites: STAT-251 or MATH-251 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-345
Engineering Economy
Time value of money, methods of comparing alternatives, depreciation and depletion, income tax consideration and capital budgeting. Cannot be used as a professional elective for ISE majors. Course provides a foundation for engineers to effectively analyze engineering projects with respect to financial considerations. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-499
Co-op (summer)
One semester of paid work experience in industrial engineering. (Prerequisites: ISEE-120 and EGEN-99 and students in the ISEE-BS program.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
MATH-221
Multivariable and Vector Calculus (General Education – Elective)
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes a study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, Stokes' Theorem, Green's Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-219. (Prerequisite: C- or better MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
4
MATH-233
Linear Systems and Differential Equations (General Education – Elective)
This is an introductory course in linear algebra and ordinary differential equations in which a scientific computing package is used to clarify mathematical concepts, visualize problems, and work with large systems. The course covers matrix algebra, the basic notions and techniques of ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients, and the physical situation in which they arise. (Prerequisites: MATH-172 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A and students in CHEM-BS or CHEM-BS/MS or ISEE-BS programs.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
4
MATH-251
Probability and Statistics (General Education – Elective)
This course introduces sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability and independence, distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions (discrete and continuous), the central limit theorem, descriptive statistics, interval estimation, and applications of probability and statistics to real-world problems. A statistical package such as Minitab or R is used for data analysis and statistical applications. (Prerequisites: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH 182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
MECE-200
Fundamentals of Mechanics
Statics: equilibrium, the principle of transmissibility of forces, couples, centroids, trusses and friction. Introduction to strength of materials: axial stresses and strains, statically indeterminate problems, torsion and bending. Dynamics: dynamics of particles and rigid bodies with an introduction to kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies, work, energy, impulse momentum and mechanical vibrations. Emphasis is on problem solving. For students majoring in industrial and systems engineering. (Prerequisites: PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or 1017-312 or 1017-312T or 1017-389 or PHYS-206 and PHYS-207 or equivalent course.and restricted to students in ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS programs.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
4
PHYS-212
University Physics II (General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective)
This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: (PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or PHYS-216) or (MECE-102, MECE-103 and MECE-205) and (MATH-182 or MATH-172 or MATH-182A) or equivalent courses. Grades of C- or better are required in all prerequisite courses.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
Third Year
ISEE-301
Operations Research
An introduction to optimization through mathematical programming and stochastic modeling techniques. Course topics include linear programming, transportation and assignment algorithms, Markov Chain queuing and their application on problems in manufacturing, health care, financial systems, supply chain, and other engineering disciplines. Special attention is placed on sensitivity analysis and the need of optimization in decision-making. The course is delivered through lectures and a weekly laboratory where students learn to use state-of-the-art software packages for modeling large discrete optimization problems. (Prerequisites: MATH-233 or (MATH-231 and MATH-241) or equivalent course.) Lab 2, Lecture 3 (Spring).
4
ISEE-304
Fundamentals of Materials Science
This course provides the student with an overview of structure, properties, and processing of metals, polymers, ceramics and composites. There is a particular emphasis on understanding of materials and the relative impact on manufacturing optimization throughput and quality as it relates to Industrial Engineering. This course is delivered through lectures and a weekly laboratory. (This course is restricted to ISEE-BS Major students.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Spring).
3
ISEE-323
Systems and Facilities Planning
A basic course in quantitative models on layout, material handling, and warehousing. Topics include product/process analysis, flow of materials, material handling systems, warehousing and layout design. A computer-aided layout design package is used. (Corequisites: ISEE-301 or equivalent course.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Spring).
3
ISEE-330
Ergonomics and Human Factors (WI-PR)
This course covers the physical and cognitive aspects of human performance to enable students to design work places, procedures, products and processes that are consistent with human capabilities and limitations. Principles of physical work and human anthropometry are studied to enable the student to systematically design work places, processes, and systems that are consistent with human capabilities and limitations. In addition, the human information processing capabilities are studied, which includes the human sensory, memory, attention and cognitive processes; display and control design principles; as well as human computer interface design. (Co-requisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Spring).
4
ISEE-350
Engineering Management
Development of the fundamental engineering management principles of industrial enterprise, including an introduction to project management. Emphasis is on project management and the development of the project management plan. At least one term of previous co-op experience is required. (Prerequisite: BIME-499 or MECE-499 or ISEE-499 or CHME-499 or EEEE-499 or CMPE-499 or MCEE-499 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ISEE-499
Co-op (fall, summer)
One semester of paid work experience in industrial engineering. (Prerequisites: ISEE-120 and EGEN-99 and students in the ISEE-BS program.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
Fourth Year
ISEE-420
Production Planning/Scheduling
A first course in mathematical modeling of production-inventory systems. Topics included: Inventory: Deterministic Models, Inventory: Stochastic Models, Push v. Pull Production Control Systems, Factory Physics, and Operations Scheduling. Modern aspects such as lean manufacturing are included in the context of the course. (Prerequisites: ISEE-301 and (STAT-251 or MATH-251) or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ISEE-499
Co-op (summer)
One semester of paid work experience in industrial engineering. (Prerequisites: ISEE-120 and EGEN-99 and students in the ISEE-BS program.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
ISEE-510
Systems Simulation
Computer-based simulation of dynamic and stochastic systems. Simulation modeling and analysis methods are the focus of this course. A high-level simulation language such as Simio, ARENA, etc., will be used to model systems and examine system performance. Model validation, design of simulation experiments, and random number generation will be introduced. (Prerequisites: ISEE-200 and ISEE-301 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-560
Applied Statistical Quality Control
An applied approach to statistical quality control utilizing theoretical tools acquired in other math and statistics courses. Heavy emphasis on understanding and applying statistical analysis methods in real-world quality control situations in engineering. Topics include process capability analysis, acceptance sampling, hypothesis testing and control charts. Contemporary topics such as six-sigma are included within the context of the course. (Prerequisites: ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252 or equivalent course and students in ISEE-BS or ISEE-MN or ENGMGT-MN programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ISEE-795
Graduate Seminar (fall and spring)
This class introduces students to state of the art research and research methods in industrial, systems, and sustainable engineering. Presentations include off campus speakers and students/faculty presentations on current research under way in the department. (This course is restricted to students in ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS or ISEE BS/MS.) Seminar 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
Professional Electives
6
 
Technology Elective
3
 
Social Context Elective
3
 
Open Electives
9
 
General Education – Immersion 1, 2
6
Fifth Year
ISEE-497
Multidisciplinary Senior Design I
This is the first in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. This first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. The second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: ISEE-323 and ISEE-330 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: ISEE-350 and ISEE-420 and ISEE-510 and ISEE-560 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
ISEE-498
Multidisciplinary Senior Design II
This is the second in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. The first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. This second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: ISEE-497 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-561
Linear Regression Analysis
In any system where parameters of interest change, it may be of interest to examine the effects that some variables exert (or appear to exert) on others. "Regression analysis" actually describes a variety of data analysis techniques that can be used to describe the interrelationships among such variables. In this course we will examine in detail the use of one popular analytic technique: least squares linear regression. Cases illustrating the use of regression techniques in engineering applications will be developed and analyzed throughout the course. (Prerequisites: (MATH-233 or (MATH-231 and MATH-241)) and (ISEE-325 or STAT-257 or MATH-252) or equivalent courses and students in ISEE-BS programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ISEE-771
Engineering of Systems I
The engineering of a system is focused on the identification of value and the value chain, requirements management and engineering, understanding the limitations of current systems, the development of the overall concept, and continually improving the robustness of the defined solution. EOS I & II is a 2-semester course sequence focused on the creation of systems that generate value for both the customer and the enterprise. Through systematic analysis and synthesis methods, novel solutions to problems are proposed and selected. This first course in the sequence focuses on the definition of the system requirements by systematic analysis of the existing problems, issues and solutions, to create an improved vision for a new system. Based on this new vision, new high-level solutions will be identified and selected for (hypothetical) further development. The focus is to learn systems engineering through a focus on an actual artifact (This course is restricted to students in the ISEE BS/MS, ISEE BS/ME, ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, PRODDEV-MS, MFLEAD-MS, ENGMGT-ME, or MIE-PHD programs or those with 5th year standing in ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ISEE-785
Fundamentals of Sustainable Engineering
This is a high level survey course that reviews the product lifecycle from various perspectives and highlights the leverage over material, process, and environmental impacts available at the design phase. Tools and strategies for reducing the environmental impacts associated with the sourcing, manufacture, use, and retirement of products will be reviewed and evaluated. (This course is restricted to students in ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, ENGMGT-ME, MECE-MS, MECE-ME, SUSPRD-MN, MIE-PHD or those with at least 4th year standing in ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ISEE-786
Lifecycle Assessment
This course introduces students to the challenges posed when trying to determine the total lifecycle impacts associated with a product or a process design. Various costing models and their inherent assumptions will be reviewed and critiqued. The inability of traditional costing models to account for important environmental and social externalities will be highlighted. The Lifecycle Assessment approach for quantifying environmental and social externalities will be reviewed and specific LCA techniques (Streamlined Lifecycle Assessment, SimaPro) will be covered. (This course is restricted to students in ISEE-MS, SUSTAIN-MS, ENGMGT-ME, MECE-MS, MECE-ME, SUSPRD-MN, MIE-PHD or those with at least 4th year standing in ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
MECE-629
Renewable Energy Systems
This course provides an overview of renewable energy system design. Energy resource assessment, system components, and feasibility analysis will be covered. Possible topics to be covered include photovoltaics, wind turbines, solar thermal, hydropower, biomass, and geothermal. Students will be responsible for a final design project. (Prerequisites: MECE-310 or equivalent course or graduate standing in MECE-MS or MECE-ME or SUSTAIN-MS or SUSTAIN-ME.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
Choose one of the following:
3
   ISEE-788
   Project with Paper
This course is used by students as a capstone experience. The student must demonstrate an acquired competence in a topic that is chosen in conference with a faculty advisor. The work may involve a research and/or design project with demonstration of acquired knowledge. A written paper and an oral presentation of the work are required. Project 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
   ISEE-792
   Engineering Capstone
Students must investigate a discipline-related topic in a field related to industrial and systems engineering, engineering management, sustainable engineering, product development, or manufacturing leadership. The general intent of the engineering capstone is to demonstrate the students' knowledge of the integrative aspects of a particular area. The capstone should draw upon skills and knowledge acquired in the program. (This course is restricted to students in ISEE-MS, ENGMGT-ME, SUSTAIN-MS, PRODDEV-MS, MFLEAD-MS or the ISEE BS/MS programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
 
 
General Education – Immersion 3
3
 
Professional Elective
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
150

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI-PR) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Admissions and Financial Aid

This program is STEM designated when studying on campus and full time.

First-Year Admission

A strong performance in a college preparatory program is expected. This includes:

  • 4 years of English
  • 3 years of social studies and/or history
  • 4 years of math is required and must include algebra, geometry, algebra 2/trigonometry, and pre-calculus. Calculus is preferred.
  • 2-3 years of science. Chemistry and physics are required.

Transfer Admission

Transfer course recommendations without associate degree
Pre-engineering courses such as calculus, calculus-based physics, chemistry, and liberal arts.

Appropriate associate degree programs for transfer
AS degree in engineering science

Learn How to Apply

Financial Aid and Scholarships

100% of all incoming first-year and transfer students receive aid.

RIT’s personalized and comprehensive financial aid program includes scholarships, grants, loans, and campus employment programs. When all these are put to work, your actual cost may be much lower than the published estimated cost of attendance.
Learn more about financial aid and scholarships

Accreditation

The BS program in industrial engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET. Visit the college's accreditation page for information on enrollment and graduation data, program educational objectives, and student outcomes.

Research

The faculty and students in the Kate Gleason College of Engineering are engaging in numerous areas of research, which takes place across all of our engineering disciplines and often involves other colleges at RIT, local health care institutions, and major industry partners. Explore the college's key research initiatives to learn more about our research in:

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