Joe Williams Headshot

Joe Williams

Senior Lecturer
Department of Criminal Justice
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-2417
Office Location

Joe Williams

Senior Lecturer
Department of Criminal Justice
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BS, Rochester Institute of Technology; MA, State University College at Brockport

Bio

Professor Williams is a lecturer in the Department of Criminal Justice and serves as the Field Experience Coordinator. He is a former New York State Policy Analyst with the New York State Assembly. During his 10 years on staff, his focus included budgetary and legislative analysis of all criminal justice programs including the Judiciary, Law Enforcement, Corrections, and Juvenile Justice services. Williams is the recipient of the 2014-2015 RIT Outstanding Teaching Award for Non-Tenure Track Faculty.

He recieved his MA in Liberal Studies from SUNY Brockport and his BS in Criminal Justice from the Rochester Institute of Technology.

Courses:

Money, Power, and Politics

585-475-2417

Currently Teaching

CRIM-110
3 Credits
This course provides an introduction to criminal justice. One of the primary goals of this course is to provide a general understanding of how the criminal justice system responds to crime in society. The main component parts of the criminal justice system (i.e., police, courts, and corrections) will be examined with a particular emphasis on developing an understanding of the behavior and interactions among the main actors in the criminal justice system. To accomplish this goal, we will examine how criminal cases are processed in the criminal justice system. We will also consider how external forces, such as political decisions, public opinion, and the media influence criminal justice decision-making. Students will also formulate, argue, and evaluate ethical perspectives regarding criminal justice systems, individual-level decisions, and recognize relationships with other ethical problems in society. Finally, throughout the course we will emphasize how the societal response to crime has evolved over time.
CRIM-220
3 Credits
Introduction to the basic organizations of the correctional system, their functions and performance. Prisons and jails, as well as probation and parole agencies, are discussed with the context of historical and contemporary philosophy. Attention also is focused on decision-making functions, the role of various personnel within the correctional system and the population of offenders within it. Strategies for rehabilitation and their effectiveness are surveyed.
CRIM-550
3 - 6 Credits
Internship practicum for all criminal justice students. Gives the student first-hand experience in the field of criminal justice in an appropriate organization that meets the needs of the student's career objectives. Students are closely supervised at selected organizations, developing their preprofessional skills while learning the organization's programs and methods.
PUBL-589
3 Credits
Allows examination of a special problem or topical area in the field of public policy. Topics and specific content and methods vary from year to year or term to term.