Kirsten Condry Headshot

Kirsten Condry

Associate Professor
Department of Psychology
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-4556
Office Location
Office Mailing Address
EAS 2382

Kirsten Condry

Associate Professor
Department of Psychology
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BA, Swarthmore College; Ph.D., University of Minnesota

Bio

Dr. Kirsten Condry joined the RIT Psychology Department in 2006. Her area of expertise is in developmental psychology, where she studies learning, perception and cognitive development in children and adults. As the 2013 recipient of the Eisenhart Award for Outstanding Teaching, her recent research focus is on developing and assessing teaching techniques to improve writing and critical thinking in college courses. Another area of interest is media effects on development and the influence of mindset on learning. Dr. Condry supervises senior projects that extend into areas like parenting, language differences and cultural influences (particularly among Deaf, hard of hearing and hearing students) and the effects of media on attitudes.

585-475-4556

Currently Teaching

PSYC-251
3 Credits
This course will serve as an advanced research methods course in psychology, and will build on the foundational knowledge presented in Research Methods I. Topics and tasks for this course include designing single and multi-factor experiments, interpreting correlational research, completing statistical analyses appropriate to design, completing and analyzing an IRB application, understanding observational and survey research, and presenting results in APA style. This is a required course for all psychology majors, and is restricted to students in the psychology program.
PSYC-301
1 Credits
This professional development course is intended for students in the psychology major to prepare for their careers. Topics include identifying career interests and values, learning how to effectively search for co-ops and jobs, preparing a resume and CV, identifying appropriate graduate programs, preparing graduate school applications, interview skills, and professional communication. Students will use career-planning resources such as the Psychology Career Center on campus and the Psychology Career Center community site on myCourses. This course is required for students majoring in Psychology.
PSYC-101
3 Credits
Introduction to the field of psychology. Provides a survey of basic concepts, theories, and research methods. Topics include: thinking critically with psychological science; neuroscience and behavior; sensation and perception; learning; memory; thinking, language, and intelligence; motivation and emotion; personality; psychological disorders and therapy; and social psychology.
PSYC-226
3 Credits
This course explores the process of human development, from conception through adolescence and continuing through later adulthood. The developmental approach integrates across many areas of psychology, including perception, cognition, social and emotional development, personality, morality, human factors, and neuroscience. Topics will include such things as infant brain plasticity, the development of identity in adolescence, and memory changes in adulthood. In addition, experimental methods of developmental research will be introduced and practiced, including issues specific to studying children and adults.
PSYC-250
3 Credits
This course will serve as an introduction to research methods in psychology, with the goal of understanding research design, analysis and writing. Topics include examining the variety of methods used in psychology research, understanding research eth-ics, developing empirical hypotheses, designing experiments, understanding statistical concepts, interpreting results, and writing research and review papers in APA style. This is a required course for all psychology majors, and is restricted to students in the psychology program.
PSYC-462
3 Credits
This course takes an in-depth look at the processes of perception and cognition as they develop over the lifespan. Drawing on basic research and theory, we will use a developmental perspective to study changes in perception and cognition. The specific course content will vary depending on the expertise of the instructor, but might include topics like sensory awareness, perceptual learning, object representation, causality, language, theory of mind, memory, or problem solving. This course is part of the Developmental Track for psychology majors.

Select Scholarship

Journal Paper
Condry, Kirsten and Albert Yonas. "Six-month-old Infants Use Motion Parallax to Direct Reaching in Depth." Infant Behavior and Development 36. 2 (2013): 238-244. Print.