Robert Ulin Headshot

Robert Ulin

Professor

Department of Sociology and Anthropology
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-3969
Office Location

Robert Ulin

Professor

Department of Sociology and Anthropology
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BA, Whittier College; MA, Ph.D., New School for Social Research

585-475-3969

Select Scholarship

Published Review
Ulin, Robert C. "Review of Chaia Heller's Food, Farms and Solidarity." Rev. of Food, Farms and Solidarity: French Farmers Challenge Industrial Agriculture & Genetically Modified Crops, by Chaia Heller. Review of Food, Farms and Solidarity Aug. 2014: 599-600. Print.
Book Chapter
Ulin, Robert C. "An Epistemological Shift in the History of Anthropology: The Linguistic turn." Historicizing Theories, Identities and Nations. Ed. Regna Darnell and Frederic W Gleach. Lincoln and London, Nebraska: University of Nebraska Press, 2017. 135-156. Print.
Ulin, Robert C. "An Epistemological Shift in the History of Anthropology: the Lingusitic Turn." Histories of Anthropology Annual. Ed. Regna Darnell and Frederic Gleach. Lincoln & London, Nebraska: University of Nebraska Press, 2017. 135-156. Print.
National/International Competition Award Winner
Ulin, Robert and Rachel E. Black. Gourmand International. Gourmand International's Runner Up Prize for the Best Book in the Category of Writing about Drink. Beijing, China, 2014.
Full Length Book
Ulin, Robert C. and Rachel E Black. Wine and Culture: From Vineyard to Glass. first ed. London, England: Bloomsbury, 2013. Print.
Ulin, Robert C. Vintages & Traditions. Chinese Translation with new Introduction ed. Yunnan, China: Yunnan University Press, 2013. Print.
Ulin, Robert C and Rachel E Black. Wine and Culture: From Vineyard to Glass. Oxford, England: Bloomsbury, 2013. Print.
Ulin, Robert C. Understanding Cultures. Second ed. England and U.S.: Blackwell, 2001. Print.

Currently Teaching

ANTH-270
3 Credits
Physically, culturally, and socially, humans live through food and drink. Spanning the globe, as nearly limitless omnivores, humans have developed myriad ways of collecting and cultivating food and taking advantage of local environments. We also put food to work for us socially by creating cuisine. Through cuisine, we forge and nourish relationships, commune with deities, and through luxury choices, demonstrate our "taste" and lay claim to elite status. Through the cultural practices of production and consumption of food and drink, we wield power. Food and drink consumption patterns have sustained slavery, poverty, malnutrition, and illegal immigration, and have laid waste to the environment. In this class, we explore physical, cultural, social, political, and economic dimensions of food and become more aware of how the private, intimate act of a bite connects us to the rest of humanity.
ANTH-102
3 Credits
Human beings across the globe live and work according to different values and beliefs. Students will develop the tools for acquiring knowledge, awareness, and appreciation of cultural differences, and in turn enhance their abilities to interact across cultures. The course accomplishes these aims by examining the relationship between individuals and their communities, and the dynamics of ritual, religious, political, and social life in different parts of the world.
ANTH-151
3 Credits
This course introduces students to the relations between food, drink, and place. Food production, circulation, and consumption will be examined critically through examining their local and global import and the assumptions that inform different food systems. Alternatives to industrialized food will be explored through both organic foods and the slow food revolution. Other themes to be examined will be food and identity, social class, and gender in particular. Students will have the opportunity to sample diverse cuisines and to discuss their relation to both place and culture. Field trips will be taken to the Rochester Public Market and to various Rochester urban gardens.
ANTH-200
3 Credits
Research is the primary pathway to theory formation in the social sciences. This course focuses on how ideas about social life emerge through research in sociology and anthropology. This course is designed as a seminar, in which students discover how scholars in these disciplines formulate research questions in relationship to theory and issues of public concern.
SOCI-200
3 Credits
Research is the primary pathway to theory formation in the social sciences. This course focuses on how ideas about social life emerge through research in sociology and anthropology. This course is designed as a seminar, in which students discover how scholars in these disciplines formulate research questions in relationship to theory and issues of public concern.