Global Literatures and Cultures Minor

4016baa6-b9aa-40ec-91a4-ed7ee7316a32 | 87099

Overview

The global literatures and cultures minor offers a rich variety of courses for students curious about global literatures and the different forms they take across cultures, from epic poetry to contemporary film. Students examine aspects of globalization and the human condition through multiple cultural lenses, better preparing them for the complex global workplace of the 21st century. Given the diverse, international backgrounds of our faculty, students learn how literary imaginations of all types are transmitted across historical epochs and national boundaries using a range of old and new material technologies.

Notes about this minor:

  • Posting of the minor on the student's academic transcript requires a minimum GPA of 2.0 in the minor.

Curriculum

Notes about this minor:

  • Posting of the minor on the student's academic transcript requires a minimum GPA of 2.0 in the minor.
Course
Required Course
ENGL-416
Global Literatures
Electives
Choose four of the following:
  ENGL-391
   Dangerous Texts
This course will examine how suppression of information has been orchestrated throughout history in different contexts. The process of suppressing information –of people in power attempting to hide images, sounds and words– must itself be viewed in perspective. We must recognize acts of censorship in relation to their social settings, political movements, religious beliefs, cultural expressions and/or personal identities. The texts that we will study were all considered dangerous enough to be banned by governments. They are dangerous because they represent sexuality, race, politics, and religion in ways that challenge the current political/cultural norms of their given culture. What, then, is so dangerous about a fictional representation? What is it that makes a certain work dangerous at a particular time and how does this danger manifest itself in stories, novels (print and graphic), and poetry? Studying these dangerous texts and watching some dangerous films we will ask: what features of political and cultural regimes do artists tend to single out for criticism? What is the range of expressive tools they use, including the contemporary context of digital media? What is it that makes intellectuals in general and imaginative writers in particular so potent a threat to established power? Do issues like these matter only in totalitarian regimes, or can we learn something about the book-banning pressures in our own society? How do social media technologies complicate discussions of censorship and creativity?
  ENGL-406
   Shakespeare: Tragedies
For almost four hundred years Shakespeare's work has stood as a monument to the literary imagination. In this course, we will study Shakespeare's tragedies with a view toward exploring the influence of his work through the ages, as well as addressing questions of canonicity. Through class discussion, interactive activities, and examination of film, students will develop strategies both to investigate the literary and theatrical power of these works as well as to consider their cultural presence in both contemporary American culture and Shakespeare's England. Particular attention will be devoted to literary theory and the variety of interpretation in order to inform readings of the plays.
  ENGL-407
   Shakespeare: Comedies
  ENGL-409
   Mythology and Literature
   ENGL-411
   American Literature
The course introduces students to American literature by tracing a particular theme through a historical survey of canonical, non-canonical, and contemporary novels, stories, poetry, and drama, as well as non-fiction forms (speeches, autobiographies, essays, etc.). Students will gain a broad understanding of American literary trends while also gaining a deep understanding of the given themes. These themes will be broadly conceived, but will also lend themselves to social, cultural, and political questions. These themes may include but are not limited to horror, gardens and machines, natives and strangers, borders, etc. While these themes deal with abstract or conceptual ideas, they lead to questions about gender, race, ethnicity, empire, and other historical problems in debates over American exceptionalism, empire, and ideology.
  ENGL-413
   African-American Literature
Students will explore the landscape of African-American literature, and learn of its development throughout the 19th and/or 20th Centuries. From Phyllis Wheatley, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Ida B. Wells to Toni Morrison, from the Harlem Renaissance, and the Black Arts Movements of the 1960s to Hip-Hop this course will explore African-American writers who inspired a civil rights and cultural revolution. Through writing, reading and research, they will grow to understand how, despite legal limits on freedom and social participation imposed because of their color in American society, blacks created styles of verbal and written expressions unique within the American experience and contributed to the shape, growth and development of the nation's literary character.
   ENGL-415
   British Literature
  ENGL-418
   Great Authors
This course provides an in-depth look at literary giants and the masterpieces of prose or poetry they have created; it's an opportunity to see the role they played both within the context of their own time and within the larger span of literary history. These great authors confront key questions of modernity that continue to occupy us to this day; they ask the question of what it means to be human and explore fundamental human themes. They give us a fresh perspective on the past and on ourselves.
  ENGL-421
   The Graphic Novel
This course charts the development of the graphic novel, examines that history in relation to other media (including literary works, comics, film, and video games), and reflects on how images and writing function in relation to one another. Primary readings will be supplemented with secondary works that address socio-historical contexts, interpretive approaches and the cultural politics of the medium, such as representations of class, race, gender, and ethnicity.
   ENGL-461
   Latin American Literature
   ENGL-470
   The Evolving English Language