Environmental Sustainability, Health and Safety Bachelor of Science Degree

In RIT’s environmental sustainability, health and safety degree you’ll become an effective champion in making organizations and companies more sustainable and less polluting and employees safer at work. 


100%

Outcomes Rate of RIT Graduates from this degree


Overview for Environmental Sustainability, Health and Safety BS

Why Study Environmental Health and Safety at RIT

  • Make a Positive Impact: Turn your passion for the environment, climate action, and worker safety into a rewarding, in demand career.
  • Earn One Degree with Two Dynamic Areas of Study: Gain in depth knowledge of both environmental sustainability and occupational health and safety.
  • Gain Real-World Experience: Four semesters of cooperative education provide you with hands-on, full-time, paid work experience in the environmental health and safety industry
  • Align Your Degree with Your Career Goals: Choose an option in environmental sustainability, health and safety, or surveying and geospatial analysis.
  • Pursue an Accelerated Degree: Earn two degrees in less time with an accelerated bachelor’s/master's option, where you can earn a BS in environmental health and safety and an MS in environmental health and safety management.
  • Strong Career Paths: Recent graduates are employed at The EPA, Wegmans, Cornell University, Corning Incorporated, John Deere, Tesla, Pratt & Whitney, The Walt Disney Company, and more.
Environmental Health and Safety Degrees: In-Demand Careers for a Sustainable Future

Environmental, health, and safety is a general term that refers to policies, laws, rules, regulations, careers, and efforts utilized by universities, school districts, local governments, companies, and environmental consulting groups to protect the health and safety of their employees and to ensure their activities do not harm the environment. It’s an in-demand field, and top companies are seeking RIT graduates to fill roles that benefit employees, the environment, and the company.

RIT’s BS in environmental sustainability, health, and safety is one dynamic degree with two robust areas of study. This major provides you with an in depth understanding of:

  • Environmental Sustainability: Helping organizations (universities, school districts, counties, companies, environmental consulting groups, etc.) identify, implement, and champion efforts to make their products, processes, and industries cleaner and more environmentally friendly.
  • Occupational Health and Safety: Protecting workers from hazards, accidents, illness, and harm while working in plants, product warehouses, and manufacturing facilities.

On the surface, these two disciplines may not seem interconnected but in reality, most organizations have dedicated teams comprised of professionals from both areas who work together to positively impact both people (the safety side) and the planet (the environmental side).

What is Environmental Sustainability?

Environmental sustainability is a responsibility to conserve natural resources and to protect the planet by making environmentally friendly decisions. Organizations employ sustainability professionals to help develop, implement, and monitor environmental strategies, policies, and programs that promote sustainable development. These include sustainable practices such as efficient water and wastewater management, limiting the use of harmful chemicals in products, using renewable energy sources to power facilities, reducing and eliminating the use of plastics and other non-biodegradable materials, managing deforestation, and more. Those that enact sustainable practices not only positively impact their employees and their communities, but these actions are long-term investments that reduce costs and operating expenses while supporting the environment.

What is Occupational Health and Safety?

Occupational health and safety focuses on making and keeping work spaces and operations safe for employees. This can include developing and implementing safety standards when using or working around equipment or toxic chemicals, evaluating the risk for and managing the prevention of workplace injury or illness, and educating employees on safety protocols and wellness practices. By maintaining a healthy workforce, organizations provide a safe work environment for their employees to do their jobs and they lessen the risk of injury or illness, which can negatively affect employee morale, production of products, seamless services, and output for an organization.

Environmental Health and Safety Courses

The environmental health and safety degree offers a comprehensive curriculum that pairs courses in environmental sustainability and occupational health and safety to provide you with a solid foundation in both areas of study. With professional electives built into the program, you can tailor your course work around the topics and career paths that interest you most.

Build Your Expertise with an Option

The environmental health and safety degree offers three options for you to further develop your understanding and expertise in a specialized area of study. 

  • Environmental Sustainability Option – Changing aspects of an organization’s behavior can have positive effects on the environment including more sustainable agriculture, safer and more sustainable products, and remediation practices for contaminated environments. For instance, product manufacturers–those who manufacture everything from phones to food–face ethical, legal, and economic issues associated with supply chains, production, product use, and product end of life. In the environmental sustainability option, you will learn how sustainability informs all of these decisions and how to implement systems that lead to more sustainable outcomes.
     
  • Health and Safety Option – In many companies, employees work in environments where they are exposed to electricity, fires and explosions, heat, chemicals, and complex machinery and robots. In this option, you’ll learn to protect employees who work in some of the most hazardous occupations. Course work will help you analyze workplace dangers to estimate risks and determine the best ways to protect employees from hazards. You’ll also learn how to empower workers to keep themselves safe. 
     
  • Surveying and Geospatial Analysis Option – This option focuses on geographical information systems and databases that provide information that aids in the safety of people and places. For example, when a fire department gets an emergency call, they turn to as GIS system. They input the address of the fire and the system provides fire fighters with the layout of a home, its proximity to fire hydrants, any overhead power or electrical lines, and other pertinent information that speeds response and decision-making time.

Furthering Your Education in Environmental Health and Safety

RIT’s Combined Accelerated Bachelor’s/Master’s Degrees enable you to earn both a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in  five years of study, giving you a competitive advantage.

  • Environmental Sustainability, Health and Safety BS/Environmental Health and Safety Management MS: In this combined accelerated dual degree, the BS degree in environmental health and safety provides you with knowledge and experience to make organizations more sustainable, more environmentally friendly, and safer. Then, in the environmental health and safety management master’s degree you learn how to develop and implement an environmental, health, and safety management system, which enables companies to continually move towards sustainability and safety goals while conforming to national and international standards. You’ll learn to identify and manage risk, and to formulate effective strategies for integrating EHS into the business government agency or organization to drive EHS and sustainability performance.
  • +1 MBA: Students who enroll in a qualifying undergraduate degree have the opportunity to enroll in the +1 MBA program by adding an MBA to their bachelor’s degree after their first year of study.

In addition, many students have completed the environmental sustainability health and safety BS degree then advanced their education with a graduate degree from other top-tier universities including Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of Pennsylvania, and Yale University.

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Careers and Cooperative Education

Typical Job Titles

Associate Environmental Engineer Chemistry Lab Supervisor
Environmental Health and Safety Specialist Environmental Health and Safety Coordinator
Environmental Health Specialist Environmental Scientist
Lecturer Risk Control Specialist
Senior HSE Representative Senior Safety Officer

Industries

  • Aerospace
  • Automotive
  • Biotech and Life Sciences
  • Construction
  • Defense
  • Environmental Services
  • Manufacturing
  • Utilities and Renewable Energy

Cooperative Education

Hands-On Experience = Real-World Skills

In our environmental health and safety degree you will complete four semesters of cooperative education. This will allow you to gain full-time, paid, hands-on experience in industry, government agencies, or environmental consulting companies as you work alongside professionals to learn how environmental sustainability practices and occupational health and safety policies directly affect the way organizations produce products, manage their facilities, balance resources, reduce illness and injury, and create safer work environments.

With the skills you gain both in and out of the classroom, you’ll be in demand as a defender of environmentally sustainable processes and a champion of occupational health and safety policies.

Curriculum for 2023-2024 for Environmental Sustainability, Health and Safety BS

Current Students: See Curriculum Requirements

Environmental Sustainability, Health and Safety, BS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CHMG-141
General & Analytical Chemistry I (General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective)
This is a general chemistry course for students in the life and physical sciences. College chemistry is presented as a science based on empirical evidence that is placed into the context of conceptual, visual, and mathematical models. Students will learn the concepts, symbolism, and fundamental tools of chemistry necessary to carry on a discourse in the language of chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between atomic structure, chemical bonds, and the transformation of these bonds through chemical reactions. The fundamentals of organic chemistry are introduced throughout the course to emphasize the connection between chemistry and the other sciences. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
CHMG-145
General & Analytical Chemistry I Lab (General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective)
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-141 lecture material. The course emphasizes laboratory techniques and data analysis skills. Topics include: gravimetric, volumetric, thermal, titration and spectrophotometric analyses, and the use of these techniques to analyze chemical reactions. (Corequisite: CHMG-141 or CHMG-131 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
1
CHMG-142
General & Analytical Chemistry II (General Education – Elective)
The course covers the thermodynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions. The relationship between energy and entropy change as the driving force of chemical processes is emphasized through the study of aqueous solutions. Specifically, the course takes a quantitative look at: 1) solubility equilibrium, 2) acid-base equilibrium, 3) oxidation-reduction reactions and 4) chemical kinetics. (Prerequisites: CHMG-141 or CHMG-131 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
CHMG-146
General Education – Elective: General & Analytical Chemistry II Lab
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-142 lecture material. The course emphasizes the use of experiments as a tool for chemical analysis and the reporting of results in formal lab reports. Topics include the quantitative analysis of a multicomponent mixture using complexation and double endpoint titration, pH measurement, buffers and pH indicators, the kinetic study of a redox reaction, and the electrochemical analysis of oxidation reduction reactions. (Prerequisites: CHMG-131 or CHMG-141 or equivalent course. Corequisites: CHMG-142 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
1
ESHS-150
Principles of Environmental Sustainability, Health and Safety
This course presents an overview of the principles of environmental sustainability, health and safety that allows students to think critically about current environmental sustainability, health and safety issues. (This course is restricted to students in the ESHS-BS program.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ESHS-180
Greenhouse Gas Management
Climate change has been recognized as the fundamental problem of the 21st century, and the anthropogenic cause of climate change has been established. This course will introduce the scientific basis of the greenhouse effect, the global carbon cycle and climate change and will identify and explore methods used to determine an organization’s GHG output. Mechanisms used by industry, governmental organizations and commercial enterprises to remain competitive as the world transitions to a low carbon economy will be explored. Students will gain GHG inventorying skills presented in ISO 14064 and the WRI Greenhouse Gas Protocol, and will gain fundamental understanding of the causes, effects, and possible mitigation strategies for climate change. Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
MATH-161
Applied Calculus (General Education – Mathematical Perspective A)
This course is an introduction to the study of differential and integral calculus, including the study of functions and graphs, limits, continuity, the derivative, derivative formulas, applications of derivatives, the definite integral, the fundamental theorem of calculus, basic techniques of integral approximation, exponential and logarithmic functions, basic techniques of integration, an introduction to differential equations, and geometric series. Applications in business, management sciences, and life sciences will be included with an emphasis on manipulative skills. (Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH-101, MATH-111, MATH-131, NMTH-260, NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or Math Placement Exam score greater than or equal to 45.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring).
4
PHYS-111
College Physics I (General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective)
This is an introductory course in algebra-based physics focusing on mechanics and waves. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton’s laws, gravitation; rotational kinematics and dynamics; work and energy; momentum and impulse; conservation laws; simple harmonic motion; waves; data presentation/analysis and error propagation. The course is taught using both traditional lectures and a workshop format that integrates material traditionally found in separate lecture, recitation, and laboratory settings. Attendance at the scheduled evening sessions of this class is required for exams. There will be 2 or 3 of these evening exams during the semester. Competency in algebra, geometry and trigonometry is required. Lab 4, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
4
 
General Education – First Year Writing: FYW (WI)
3
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. (This class is restricted to incoming 1st year or global campus students.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
Second Year
BIOL-101
General Biology I (General Education)
This course serves as an introduction to cellular, molecular, and evolutionary biology. Topics will include: a study of the basic principles of modern cellular biology, including cell structure and function; the chemical basis and functions of life, including enzyme systems and gene expression; and the origin of life and evolutionary patterns of organism development on Earth. Lecture 3 (Fall, Summer).
3
BIOL-103
General Biology I Lab (General Education)
This course provides laboratory work to complement the lecture material of General Biology I. The experiments are designed to illustrate concepts of basic cellular and molecular biology, develop laboratory skills and techniques for microscopy, and improve ability to make, record and interpret observations. (Co-requisites: BIOL-101 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Summer).
1
ESHS-201
Environmental Monitoring and Measurement I
This laboratory course provides students with skills used in geologic investigations and investigations of contaminated sites. Students will learn to describe and analyze surficial and shallow subsurface geological features, and to plan, execute, and interpret sampling events. (Prerequisites: CHMG-141 and CHMG-145 or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall).
2
ESHS-210
Sustainable Earth Resources
An introduction to geology from an earth resources-economic geology prospective, focusing on sustainability of green energy resources. Basic geology topics include earth materials, internal forces, and surface processes. Environmental topics include soil and water resources. Sustainability of earth resources is explored, including strategic and industrial minerals, long-term viability of fossil fuels, and the sustainability of minerals crucial for renewable energy production and storage. The course will also explore ethical issues associated with fossil fuel use, conflict mineral extraction, the uneven distribution of benefits associated with Earth resource extraction, and the uneven distribution of negative consequences, both environmental and social, of Earth resource extraction. Scientific and ethical questions will be discussed throughout the course. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ESHS-251
Environmental Monitoring and Measurement II
This laboratory course provides students with skills used in hydrologic investigations and investigations of contaminated sites. Students will learn field skills to support surface water investigations, groundwater investigations, and investigations of contaminated sites. Students will also learn to specify sampling any chemical analysis for contaminated sites, and to use common air and water quality field analytical instruments. (Prerequisites: ESHS-201 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: ESHS-250 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Recitation 1 (Spring).
2
ESHS-290
Social Responsibility and Environmental Sustainability (WI-PR)
This course will introduce social responsibility concepts and approaches presented in key documents like the ISO 26000 Social Responsibility Standard and the Universal Bill of Human Rights, and will explore the web of relationships in which an organization or a community exists, with the objective of providing the foundational knowledge necessary to plan a strategy for closing the gap between the activities, products and services of the organization or community and the ecosystem within which it exists. Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ESHS-300
Environmental, Health, and Safety Professional Communication
Communication of environmental sustainability health and safety (ESHS) information and issues is critical for awareness, information, and action. Students develop skill in reporting and conveying ESHS and scientific information internally to the organization and externally to the public or regulating agencies. Students also gain an understanding of the role of the media and public relations in the environmental communication process. Students learn strategies and formats for communicating safety information, especially in procedures and instructional materials. Writing and speaking skills are sharpened for successful business, media and crisis communication. (Prerequisite: UWRT-150 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ESHS-310
Solid and Hazardous Waste Management
An examination of strategies and technologies to move an organization toward environmental sustainability, including resource use reduction, material substitution, process and product modification, and waste minimization; and for handling and managing wastes including treatment, storage, transport, and disposal storing solid and hazardous waste. Associated environmental impacts, regulatory concerns, technical feasibility, and costs are considered. (Prerequisites: ESHS-150 and CHMG-141 and CHMG-142 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ESHS-320
Principles of Safety
This course is an introduction to the physical and occupational safety tools and techniques and connection to sustainability. Course emphasizes safety excellence though broad application of hazard identification, control and mitigation across industry and community operations, from design to safe use, occupational and process systems. This course reviews OSHA, other regulations, consensus guidelines, and best practices that pertain to maintaining safe operations and physical locations. Management of safety is discussed: inspection, committees, written programs, reporting and agency communications. Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ESHS-360
Sustainable World Water Supply
The World Health Organization estimates that one in eight people do not have access to a safe drinking water supply. The U.S. State Department has stated that armed conflict over water rights is possible on many of the world’s river systems including the Nile, Tigris/Euphrates, Brahmaputra-Jamuna, and Mekong. What is the cause of these problems and how will changes to the hydrologic cycle and world water supply brought about by climate change affect them? Students will learn about the hydrologic cycle, the general characteristics of surface water and groundwater, and global patterns of water use. Students will learn about the health, economic, and social consequences of drought and flooding, and the effect climate change is having on water supply in arid countries. Laws and government regulation of water withdrawal and use will be covered, as will techniques to extend the available water supply. Students will consider the positive and negative consequences of increasing the sustainability of the water supply through efficiency, conservation, inter-basin transfer, water use export, grey and black water reuse, urban runoff capture, and the creation of fresh water through desalination. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
PHYS-112
General Education – Elective: College Physics II
This course is an introduction to algebra-based physics focusing on thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, and elementary topics in modern physics. Topics include heat and temperature, laws of thermodynamics, electric and magnetic forces and fields, DC and AC electrical circuits, electromagnetic induction, the concept of the photon, and the Bohr model of the atom. The course is taught using both traditional lectures and a workshop format that integrates material traditionally found in separate lecture, recitation, and laboratory settings. Attendance at the scheduled evening sessions of this class is required for exams. There will be 2 or 3 of these evening exams during the semester. (Prerequisites: PHYS-111 or PHYS-211 or equivalent course.) Lab 4, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
4
Third Year
ENGT-95
Career Seminar
This course is an introduction to the cooperative educational program at RIT, the programs in the department, and RIT resources. Topics include engineering technology vs. engineering, review of resources available at RIT, the cooperative education placement process, and the ethical expectations of employers for co-op students and RIT during a job search. Seminar 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
ESHS-330
Industrial Wastewater Management
This course investigates characteristics and sources of industrial wastewaters, related environmental impacts, regulatory implications, and technical considerations of current treatment and disposal methodologies. Students learn to identify appropriate methods, technologies, and sequences for source reduction, treatment and pretreatment, direct discharge, and management of treatment residuals. (Prerequisites: ESHS-150 and CHMG-141 and CHMG-142 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ESHS-499
ESHS Co-op (spring, summer)
ESHS Co-op. Department permission is required. (Prerequisites: ENGT-95 or equivalent course.) CO OP .
0
ESHS-511
Environmental & Occupational Health
This course will provide students with the fundamentals of industrial hygiene and environmental public health, including exposure systems for various chemical, biological, and physical toxicants on individuals or within populations. Fundamentals of, monitoring and sampling, and the hierarchy of controls are covered; Determining roles and the ways in which industrial hygiene may interact with other disciplines such as public health, occupational medicine or environmental engineering are explored. When both this course and ESHS-512 lab are completed, the OSHA 40 hour HAZWOPER certificate is earned. Any non-ESHM program students may take this course without the required lab requisite with permission from the department. This course is co-listed with ESHS-611; students may receive credit for ESHS-511 or ESHS-611, not both. (Prerequisites: ESHS-150 and CHMG-141 and BIOL-101 and BIOL-103 or equivalent courses. Students may not take and receive credit for this course if they have already taken ESHS-611.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ESHS-512
Environmental & Occupational Health Lab
Weekly labs and associated reports develop skills and understanding of calibration and use of air sampling equipment and other instrumentation to assess workplace health hazards. Hands-on practical hazardous material response. Students who complete the course will receive OSHA HAZWOPER 40 hour certification. (Prerequisites: CHMG-141 or equivalent course. Co-requisite: ESHS-511 or equivalent course.) Lab 2 (Fall).
1
STAT-145
Introduction to Statistics I (General Education – Mathematical Perspective B)
This course introduces statistical methods of extracting meaning from data, and basic inferential statistics. Topics covered include data and data integrity, exploratory data analysis, data visualization, numeric summary measures, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. The emphasis of the course is on statistical thinking rather than computation. Statistical software is used. (Prerequisites: Any 100 level MATH course, or NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or (NMTH-250 with a C- or better) or a Math Placement Exam score of at least 35.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
 
General Education – Elective
3
 
General Education – Immersion 1
3
Fourth Year
BIOL-102
General Biology II (General Education)
This course serves as an introduction to animal and plant anatomy and physiology, in addition to the fundamentals of ecology. Topics will include: animal development; animal body systems; plant development; unique plant systems; Earth's terrestrial and aquatic environments; population and community ecology; animal behavior; and conservation biology. Lecture 3 (Spring, Summer).
3
BIOL-104
General Biology II Lab (General Education)
This course provides laboratory work to complement the material of General Biology II. The experiments are designed to illustrate concepts of animal and plant anatomy and physiology, develop laboratory skills and techniques for experimenting with live organisms, and improve ability to make, record, and interpret observations. (Co-requisites: BIOL-102 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Spring, Summer).
1
ESHS-460
EHS Accident Causation and Prevention
Historical as well as modern accident and incident causation models and theories will be covered. Students will learn how to identify and prevent unsafe acts and conditions that can lead to accidents and incidents. The application of management system controls, including operational controls to prevent accidents and incidents, will be reviewed. In addition, students will learn how to investigate accidents and incidents. They will also learn how to develop accident and incident investigation written programs. (Prerequisites: ESHS-320 or equivalent course and at least 4th year standing in the ESHS-BS program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ESHS-480
EHS Law
An overview of environmental, health and safety (EHS) related law with an emphasis on legislative law. Topics include a review of the historical and modern sources for EHS law, the emergence of administrative law and the responsibilities of the separate branches of government. Major EHS related legislation will be covered. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 4th year standing.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ESHS-499
ESHS Co-op (summer)
ESHS Co-op. Department permission is required. (Prerequisites: ENGT-95 or equivalent course.) CO OP .
0
ESHS-525
Air Emissions Management
This course will present an overview of industrial air pollution management, its sources, methods of reduction, control, and management. Students will become familiar with the history of air pollution, the chemistry and effects of pollutants, regulations and standards, and control technologies as well as developing analytical and quantitative skills necessary in air emissions management decision-making. This course is co-listed with ESHS-615; students may receive credit for ESHS-525 or ESHS-615, not both. (Prerequisites: ESHS-150 and (CHMG-141 or CHMG-111) or equivalent courses. Students cannot take and receive credit for this course if they have taken ESHS-615.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
 
Open Electives
6
 
Professional Electives
6
 
General Education – Immersion 2, 3
6
Fifth Year
ESHS-499
ESHS Co-op (fall)
ESHS Co-op. Department permission is required. (Prerequisites: ENGT-95 or equivalent course.) CO OP .
0
ESHS-515
Corporate EHS Management
Presents the fundamentals of how companies manage their environmental, health and safety issues. EHS motivations and strategies for corporate ESHS management will be explored. Organizational considerations for managing corporate EHS programs will be identified. Total quality management and its applications to corporate EHS problem solving will be introduced. The basic elements of EHS management systems will be reviewed. EHS training and corporate EHS reporting will also be examined. (Prerequisites: ESHS-460 and ESHS-480 or equivalent courses and 5th year standing in the ESHS-BS program.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ESHS-590
Capstone Project
This is a faculty-designed capstone team project course for 5th year ESHS students. It presents students with one or more identified EHS need(s) and challenges them to work together to plan, schedule, and carry out a project to design and develop socially responsible and environmentally sustainable solutions. The project may vary from offering to offering reflecting current trends and developments. (Prerequisites: ESHS-290 or equivalent course and 5th year standing in the ESHS-BS program.) Project 3 (Spring).
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
 
Open Electives
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
126

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Options

Students who elect to pursue a Degree Option may use any combination of Open and Professional Electives to complete one of the options listed below:

Environmental Sustainability

Complete 9 credits from the following courses:
ESHS-370
Sustainable Food Systems
Food is a powerful lever to optimize human health and environmental sustainability on Earth. However, problems associated with food and our food production systems are currently threatening both people and planet. An immense challenge facing humanity is to provide a growing world population with healthy diets that are based on ethically managed and sustainable food systems. While global food production has generally kept pace with population growth, more than 820 million people still lack sufficient food, and many more consume either low-quality diets or too much food. To have any hope of meeting the central goal of the Paris Climate Agreement, which is to limit global warming to 2°C or less, our carbon emissions from agriculture and food waste must be significantly reduced. This course will examine the sustainability and ethical issues and weaknesses in our current global food system. Key topics will include the ethical failures and environmental impacts of different agricultural practices; the ethics of patenting seeds and developing GMO crops reliant on harmful pesticides; how processed food and packaging impact the environment; the social, health and environmental effects of various diets; how climate change is impacting agriculture; and ultimately how can we meet the nutritional needs of the planet in an ethical and sustainable manner. Lecture 3 (Fall).
ESHS-544
Remedial Investigation & Corrective Action
Describes the sequence of events required to investigate, conduct feasibility studies, and identify appropriate corrective actions at hazardous waste sites. Explains the process flow logistics, concepts, and rationale behind each action. Explores current issues of how clean is clean? Students learn to develop conceptual site characterization plans, effective RI/CA proposals, review and evaluate work plans, procedures and operations plans, and contingency plans (Prerequisites: ESHS-310 and ESHS-330 and ESHS-350 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
ESHS-565
Sustainable Product Stewardship
This course examines the principles of sustainable product stewardship, including the ethical, legal, and economic issues that product manufacturers face as well as the relationship between products and sustainability. Students will learn and apply some environmental sustainability, health and safety analysis techniques used to identify and manage product environmental sustainability aspects as well as health and safety hazards. Students will use case studies to examine the concept of product stewardship management through product life cycle thinking and extended producer responsibility. (Students who have completed ESHS-665 Product Stewardship may not receive credit for this course.) Lecture 3 (Summer).

Occupational Health and Safety

Complete 9 credits from the following courses:
   ESHS-225
 Construction Safety
This course is designed to cover construction health and safety hazards and will study OSHA regulations in depth. Students get to handle and investigate construction safety issues, the OSHA standards addressing trench excavation, scaffolding, temporary electric circuits, fall protection, HAZCOM, underground construction are studied. Lecture 3 (Spring).
   ESHS-501
 Fire Protection
Introduces fundamental concepts in protection of industrial workers and property from fire and explosion. Fire chemistry, control of ignition sources in industry, and properties of combustible materials are discussed. Fire detection and extinguishment are covered along with building construction for fire prevention, life safety, fire codes, and related topics. This course is co-listed with ESHS-601; students may receive credit for ESHS-501 or ESHS-601, not both. (Students cannot take and receive credit for this course if they have taken ESHS-601.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
   ESHS-530
 Mechanical and Electrical Safeguarding
Discussion of machine safety with emphasis on hazard analysis, risk estimation, safeguarding techniques, and electrical safety. Particular attention will be paid to applicable OSHA, ANSI, NFPA, and EN standards as they relate to wood, metal, films, and automation. Elements of the course will change regularly to reflect emerging issues in industry. This course is co-listed with ESHS-630; students may receive credit for ESHS-530 or ESHS-630, not both. (Students cannot take and receive credit for this course if they have taken ESHS-630.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
   ESHS-565
Sustainable Product Stewardship
This course examines the principles of sustainable product stewardship, including the ethical, legal, and economic issues that product manufacturers face as well as the relationship between products and sustainability. Students will learn and apply some environmental sustainability, health and safety analysis techniques used to identify and manage product environmental sustainability aspects as well as health and safety hazards. Students will use case studies to examine the concept of product stewardship management through product life cycle thinking and extended producer responsibility. (Students who have completed ESHS-665 Product Stewardship may not receive credit for this course.) Lecture 3 (Summer).

Surveying and Geospatial Analysis

Complete 10 credits from the following courses:
   CVET-160
Surveying
Introduction to fundamentals of surveying. Topics include note taking; differential leveling; vertical and horizontal measurement; traversing; topographic mapping; horizontal, vertical, compound and reverse curves; and earthwork. (Co-requisites: CVET-161 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
   CVET-161
Surveying Laboratory
Students apply the fundamentals of surveying to field exercises using modern surveying equipment. Field exercises include differential leveling, cross sections, traversing, topographic mapping, horizontal curve layout, vertical curve design, and earthwork estimation. (Co-requisites: CVET-160 or equivalent course.) Lab 2 (Fall).
   CVET-423
GIS for CETEMS
This course examines the fundamentals of geographic information systems and their application in the fields of civil engineering and environmental management. It emphasizes the application of GIS technology to problems such as, but not limited to, water resource management, asset management, environmental impact assessments, urban planning, and transportation. (Enrollment in this course is restricted to students with at least 3rd year standing in CVET-BS or ESHS-BS.) Lec/Lab 4 (Spring).
   IGME-382
Maps, Mapping and Geospatial Technologies
This course provides a survey of underlying concepts and technologies used to represent and understand the earth, a form of new media collectively referred to as Geospatial Technologies (GTs). Students will gain hands-on experience with GTs, including Global Positioning Systems (GPSs), Geographic Information Systems (GISs), remote sensing, Virtual Globes, and geographically-oriented new media such as mapping mashups. Students also will develop basic spatial thinking, reasoning, problem solving, and literacy skills. Lec/Lab 3 (Fall).

Combined Accelerated Bachelor's/Master's Degrees

The curriculum below outlines the typical course sequence(s) for combined accelerated degrees available with this bachelor's degree.

Environmental Sustainability, Health and Safety, BS degree/Environmental Health and Safety Management, MS degree (project option), typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CHMG-141
General & Analytical Chemistry I (General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective)
This is a general chemistry course for students in the life and physical sciences. College chemistry is presented as a science based on empirical evidence that is placed into the context of conceptual, visual, and mathematical models. Students will learn the concepts, symbolism, and fundamental tools of chemistry necessary to carry on a discourse in the language of chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between atomic structure, chemical bonds, and the transformation of these bonds through chemical reactions. The fundamentals of organic chemistry are introduced throughout the course to emphasize the connection between chemistry and the other sciences. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
CHMG-142
General & Analytical Chemistry II (General Education – Elective)
The course covers the thermodynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions. The relationship between energy and entropy change as the driving force of chemical processes is emphasized through the study of aqueous solutions. Specifically, the course takes a quantitative look at: 1) solubility equilibrium, 2) acid-base equilibrium, 3) oxidation-reduction reactions and 4) chemical kinetics. (Prerequisites: CHMG-141 or CHMG-131 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
CHMG-145
General & Analytical Chemistry I Lab (General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective)
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-141 lecture material. The course emphasizes laboratory techniques and data analysis skills. Topics include: gravimetric, volumetric, thermal, titration and spectrophotometric analyses, and the use of these techniques to analyze chemical reactions. (Corequisite: CHMG-141 or CHMG-131 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
1
CHMG-146
General & Analytical Chemistry II Lab (General Education – Elective)
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-142 lecture material. The course emphasizes the use of experiments as a tool for chemical analysis and the reporting of results in formal lab reports. Topics include the quantitative analysis of a multicomponent mixture using complexation and double endpoint titration, pH measurement, buffers and pH indicators, the kinetic study of a redox reaction, and the electrochemical analysis of oxidation reduction reactions. (Prerequisites: CHMG-131 or CHMG-141 or equivalent course. Corequisites: CHMG-142 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
1
ESHS-150
Principles of Environmental Sustainability, Health and Safety
This course presents an overview of the principles of environmental sustainability, health and safety that allows students to think critically about current environmental sustainability, health and safety issues. (This course is restricted to students in the ESHS-BS program.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ESHS-180
Greenhouse Gas Management
Climate change has been recognized as the fundamental problem of the 21st century, and the anthropogenic cause of climate change has been established. This course will introduce the scientific basis of the greenhouse effect, the global carbon cycle and climate change and will identify and explore methods used to determine an organization’s GHG output. Mechanisms used by industry, governmental organizations and commercial enterprises to remain competitive as the world transitions to a low carbon economy will be explored. Students will gain GHG inventorying skills presented in ISO 14064 and the WRI Greenhouse Gas Protocol, and will gain fundamental understanding of the causes, effects, and possible mitigation strategies for climate change. Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
MATH-161
Applied Calculus (General Education – Mathematical Perspective A)
This course is an introduction to the study of differential and integral calculus, including the study of functions and graphs, limits, continuity, the derivative, derivative formulas, applications of derivatives, the definite integral, the fundamental theorem of calculus, basic techniques of integral approximation, exponential and logarithmic functions, basic techniques of integration, an introduction to differential equations, and geometric series. Applications in business, management sciences, and life sciences will be included with an emphasis on manipulative skills. (Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH-101, MATH-111, MATH-131, NMTH-260, NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or Math Placement Exam score greater than or equal to 45.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring).
4
PHYS-111
College Physics I (General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective)
This is an introductory course in algebra-based physics focusing on mechanics and waves. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton’s laws, gravitation; rotational kinematics and dynamics; work and energy; momentum and impulse; conservation laws; simple harmonic motion; waves; data presentation/analysis and error propagation. The course is taught using both traditional lectures and a workshop format that integrates material traditionally found in separate lecture, recitation, and laboratory settings. Attendance at the scheduled evening sessions of this class is required for exams. There will be 2 or 3 of these evening exams during the semester. Competency in algebra, geometry and trigonometry is required. Lab 4, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
4
UWRT-150
FYW: First-Year Writing (WI) (General Education)
Writing Seminar is a three-credit course limited to 19 students per section. The course is designed to develop first-year students’ proficiency in analytical and rhetorical reading and writing, and critical thinking. Students will read, understand, and interpret a variety of non-fiction texts representing different cultural perspectives and/or academic disciplines. These texts are designed to challenge students intellectually and to stimulate their writing for a variety of contexts and purposes. Through inquiry-based assignment sequences, students will develop academic research and literacy practices that will be further strengthened throughout their academic careers. Particular attention will be given to the writing process, including an emphasis on teacher-student conferencing, critical self-assessment, class discussion, peer review, formal and informal writing, research, and revision. Small class size promotes frequent student-instructor and student-student interaction. The course also emphasizes the principles of intellectual property and academic integrity for both current academic and future professional writing. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. (This class is restricted to incoming 1st year or global campus students.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
Second Year
BIOL-101
General Biology I (General Education – Elective)
This course serves as an introduction to cellular, molecular, and evolutionary biology. Topics will include: a study of the basic principles of modern cellular biology, including cell structure and function; the chemical basis and functions of life, including enzyme systems and gene expression; and the origin of life and evolutionary patterns of organism development on Earth. Lecture 3 (Fall, Summer).
3
BIOL-103
General Biology I Lab (General Education – Elective)
This course provides laboratory work to complement the lecture material of General Biology I. The experiments are designed to illustrate concepts of basic cellular and molecular biology, develop laboratory skills and techniques for microscopy, and improve ability to make, record and interpret observations. (Co-requisites: BIOL-101 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Summer).
1
ENGT-95
Career Seminar
This course is an introduction to the cooperative educational program at RIT, the programs in the department, and RIT resources. Topics include engineering technology vs. engineering, review of resources available at RIT, the cooperative education placement process, and the ethical expectations of employers for co-op students and RIT during a job search. Seminar 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
ESHS-201
Environmental Monitoring and Measurement I
This laboratory course provides students with skills used in geologic investigations and investigations of contaminated sites. Students will learn to describe and analyze surficial and shallow subsurface geological features, and to plan, execute, and interpret sampling events. (Prerequisites: CHMG-141 and CHMG-145 or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall).
2
ESHS-210
Sustainable Earth Resources
An introduction to geology from an earth resources-economic geology prospective, focusing on sustainability of green energy resources. Basic geology topics include earth materials, internal forces, and surface processes. Environmental topics include soil and water resources. Sustainability of earth resources is explored, including strategic and industrial minerals, long-term viability of fossil fuels, and the sustainability of minerals crucial for renewable energy production and storage. The course will also explore ethical issues associated with fossil fuel use, conflict mineral extraction, the uneven distribution of benefits associated with Earth resource extraction, and the uneven distribution of negative consequences, both environmental and social, of Earth resource extraction. Scientific and ethical questions will be discussed throughout the course. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ESHS-251
Environmental Monitoring and Measurement II
This laboratory course provides students with skills used in hydrologic investigations and investigations of contaminated sites. Students will learn field skills to support surface water investigations, groundwater investigations, and investigations of contaminated sites. Students will also learn to specify sampling any chemical analysis for contaminated sites, and to use common air and water quality field analytical instruments. (Prerequisites: ESHS-201 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: ESHS-250 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Recitation 1 (Spring).
2
ESHS-290
Social Responsibility and Environmental Sustainability (WI-PR)
This course will introduce social responsibility concepts and approaches presented in key documents like the ISO 26000 Social Responsibility Standard and the Universal Bill of Human Rights, and will explore the web of relationships in which an organization or a community exists, with the objective of providing the foundational knowledge necessary to plan a strategy for closing the gap between the activities, products and services of the organization or community and the ecosystem within which it exists. Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ESHS-300
Environmental, Health and Safety Professional Communication
Communication of environmental sustainability health and safety (ESHS) information and issues is critical for awareness, information, and action. Students develop skill in reporting and conveying ESHS and scientific information internally to the organization and externally to the public or regulating agencies. Students also gain an understanding of the role of the media and public relations in the environmental communication process. Students learn strategies and formats for communicating safety information, especially in procedures and instructional materials. Writing and speaking skills are sharpened for successful business, media and crisis communication. (Prerequisite: UWRT-150 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ESHS-310
Solid and Hazardous Waste Management
An examination of strategies and technologies to move an organization toward environmental sustainability, including resource use reduction, material substitution, process and product modification, and waste minimization; and for handling and managing wastes including treatment, storage, transport, and disposal storing solid and hazardous waste. Associated environmental impacts, regulatory concerns, technical feasibility, and costs are considered. (Prerequisites: ESHS-150 and CHMG-141 and CHMG-142 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ESHS-320
Principles of Safety
This course is an introduction to the physical and occupational safety tools and techniques and connection to sustainability. Course emphasizes safety excellence though broad application of hazard identification, control and mitigation across industry and community operations, from design to safe use, occupational and process systems. This course reviews OSHA, other regulations, consensus guidelines, and best practices that pertain to maintaining safe operations and physical locations. Management of safety is discussed: inspection, committees, written programs, reporting and agency communications. Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ESHS-360
Sustainable World Water Supply
The World Health Organization estimates that one in eight people do not have access to a safe drinking water supply. The U.S. State Department has stated that armed conflict over water rights is possible on many of the world’s river systems including the Nile, Tigris/Euphrates, Brahmaputra-Jamuna, and Mekong. What is the cause of these problems and how will changes to the hydrologic cycle and world water supply brought about by climate change affect them? Students will learn about the hydrologic cycle, the general characteristics of surface water and groundwater, and global patterns of water use. Students will learn about the health, economic, and social consequences of drought and flooding, and the effect climate change is having on water supply in arid countries. Laws and government regulation of water withdrawal and use will be covered, as will techniques to extend the available water supply. Students will consider the positive and negative consequences of increasing the sustainability of the water supply through efficiency, conservation, inter-basin transfer, water use export, grey and black water reuse, urban runoff capture, and the creation of fresh water through desalination. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ESHS-499
ESHS Co-op (summer)
ESHS Co-op. Department permission is required. (Prerequisites: ENGT-95 or equivalent course.) CO OP .
0
PHYS-112
College Physics II (General Education – Elective)
This course is an introduction to algebra-based physics focusing on thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, and elementary topics in modern physics. Topics include heat and temperature, laws of thermodynamics, electric and magnetic forces and fields, DC and AC electrical circuits, electromagnetic induction, the concept of the photon, and the Bohr model of the atom. The course is taught using both traditional lectures and a workshop format that integrates material traditionally found in separate lecture, recitation, and laboratory settings. Attendance at the scheduled evening sessions of this class is required for exams. There will be 2 or 3 of these evening exams during the semester. (Prerequisites: PHYS-111 or PHYS-211 or equivalent course.) Lab 4, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
4
Third Year
BIOL-102
General Biology II (General Education – Elective)
This course serves as an introduction to animal and plant anatomy and physiology, in addition to the fundamentals of ecology. Topics will include: animal development; animal body systems; plant development; unique plant systems; Earth's terrestrial and aquatic environments; population and community ecology; animal behavior; and conservation biology. Lecture 3 (Spring, Summer).
3
BIOL-104
General Biology II Lab (General Education – Elective)
This course provides laboratory work to complement the material of General Biology II. The experiments are designed to illustrate concepts of animal and plant anatomy and physiology, develop laboratory skills and techniques for experimenting with live organisms, and improve ability to make, record, and interpret observations. (Co-requisites: BIOL-102 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Spring, Summer).
1
ESHS-330
Industrial Wastewater Management
This course investigates characteristics and sources of industrial wastewaters, related environmental impacts, regulatory implications, and technical considerations of current treatment and disposal methodologies. Students learn to identify appropriate methods, technologies, and sequences for source reduction, treatment and pretreatment, direct discharge, and management of treatment residuals. (Prerequisites: ESHS-150 and CHMG-141 and CHMG-142 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ESHS-480
EHS Law
An overview of environmental, health and safety (EHS) related law with an emphasis on legislative law. Topics include a review of the historical and modern sources for EHS law, the emergence of administrative law and the responsibilities of the separate branches of government. Major EHS related legislation will be covered. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 4th year standing.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ESHS-499
ESHS Co-op (summer)
ESHS Co-op. Department permission is required. (Prerequisites: ENGT-95 or equivalent course.) CO OP .
0
ESHS-511
Environmental & Occupational Health
This course will provide students with the fundamentals of industrial hygiene and environmental public health, including exposure systems for various chemical, biological, and physical toxicants on individuals or within populations. Fundamentals of, monitoring and sampling, and the hierarchy of controls are covered; Determining roles and the ways in which industrial hygiene may interact with other disciplines such as public health, occupational medicine or environmental engineering are explored. When both this course and ESHS-512 lab are completed, the OSHA 40 hour HAZWOPER certificate is earned. Any non-ESHM program students may take this course without the required lab requisite with permission from the department. This course is co-listed with ESHS-611; students may receive credit for ESHS-511 or ESHS-611, not both. (Prerequisites: ESHS-150 and CHMG-141 and BIOL-101 and BIOL-103 or equivalent courses. Students may not take and receive credit for this course if they have already taken ESHS-611.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ESHS-512
Environmental & Occupational Health Lab
Weekly labs and associated reports develop skills and understanding of calibration and use of air sampling equipment and other instrumentation to assess workplace health hazards. Hands-on practical hazardous material response. Students who complete the course will receive OSHA HAZWOPER 40 hour certification. (Prerequisites: CHMG-141 or equivalent course. Co-requisite: ESHS-511 or equivalent course.) Lab 2 (Fall).
1
ESHS-525
Air Emissions Management
This course will present an overview of industrial air pollution management, its sources, methods of reduction, control, and management. Students will become familiar with the history of air pollution, the chemistry and effects of pollutants, regulations and standards, and control technologies as well as developing analytical and quantitative skills necessary in air emissions management decision-making. This course is co-listed with ESHS-615; students may receive credit for ESHS-525 or ESHS-615, not both. (Prerequisites: ESHS-150 and (CHMG-141 or CHMG-111) or equivalent courses. Students cannot take and receive credit for this course if they have taken ESHS-615.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
STAT-145
Introduction to Statistics I (General Education – Mathematical Perspective B)
This course introduces statistical methods of extracting meaning from data, and basic inferential statistics. Topics covered include data and data integrity, exploratory data analysis, data visualization, numeric summary measures, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. The emphasis of the course is on statistical thinking rather than computation. Statistical software is used. (Prerequisites: Any 100 level MATH course, or NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or (NMTH-250 with a C- or better) or a Math Placement Exam score of at least 35.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
 
General Education – Elective
3
 
Open Elective
3
 
General Education – Immersion 1, 2
6
Fourth Year
ESHS-460
EHS Accident Causation and Prevention
Historical as well as modern accident and incident causation models and theories will be covered. Students will learn how to identify and prevent unsafe acts and conditions that can lead to accidents and incidents. The application of management system controls, including operational controls to prevent accidents and incidents, will be reviewed. In addition, students will learn how to investigate accidents and incidents. They will also learn how to develop accident and incident investigation written programs. (Prerequisites: ESHS-320 or equivalent course and at least 4th year standing in the ESHS-BS program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ESHS-499
ESHS Co-op (summer)
ESHS Co-op. Department permission is required. (Prerequisites: ENGT-95 or equivalent course.) CO OP .
0
ESHS-515
Corporate EHS Management
Presents the fundamentals of how companies manage their environmental, health and safety issues. EHS motivations and strategies for corporate ESHS management will be explored. Organizational considerations for managing corporate EHS programs will be identified. Total quality management and its applications to corporate EHS problem solving will be introduced. The basic elements of EHS management systems will be reviewed. EHS training and corporate EHS reporting will also be examined. (Prerequisites: ESHS-460 and ESHS-480 or equivalent courses and 5th year standing in the ESHS-BS program.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ESHS-720
Environmental, Health and Safety Management
This is the initial course in the curriculum core of RIT's MS degree program in Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) Management. It defines and profiles EHS management within the organization; explores EHS management history, motivations, and strategies; introduces current and developing systems for managing an organization's EHS aspects; and investigates the elements and implications of developing an organizational EHS vision and policy statement. The course's unique delivery style combines elements of distance-learning and an onsite executive-leader format. (This course is restricted to students in the EHSM-MS program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
GRCS-701
Research Methods
Understanding research and academic writing are foundational skills for all graduate students regardless of degree culmination. This is a graduate-level survey course on research design/methods and analysis, with the goal of all students becoming better consumers of research, and preparing those who choose an empirical research degree culmination and future doctoral pursuits. The course provides a broad overview of the process and practices of research in applied contexts. Content includes principles and techniques of research design, sampling, data collection, and analysis including the nature of evidence, types of research, defining research questions, sampling techniques, data collection, data analysis, issues concerning human subjects and research ethics, and challenges associated with conducting research in real-world contexts. Research strategies using library sources, including academic databases and citation management, are emphasized; as are academic writing skills, including adherence to academic style. The analysis component of the course provides an understanding of statistical methodology used to collect and interpret data found in research as well as how to read and interpret data collection instruments. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
 
Professional Elective
3
 
General Education – Immersion 3
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
 
Open Electives
9
Fifth Year
ESHS-740
EHS Management System Design
This course examines the design and development of environmental, health and safety management systems in order to implement an organization's policies and offers strategies for measurement of results in order to assess performance and ensure continual improvement. Significant team project work as well as individual work is required. (Prerequisites: ESHS-720 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ESHS-755
Corporate Social Responsibility
This course will introduce social responsibility concepts and approaches presented in key documents like the ISO 26000 Social Responsibility Standard, and will explore strategies for assisting an organization to identify and implement socially responsible initiatives appropriate to the nature and scope of its activities, products, and services. (This course is restricted to students in the EHSM-MS program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ESHS-760
Integrating EHS Management
This course examines strategies for integrating EHS systems and processes. Using case studies, the course explores interrelationships between EHS and total quality management, business value, reporting, and approaches for sustainable business development. Students will be prepared to select appropriate quality tools to improve EHS processes; identify opportunities, strategies, and tools for integrating EHS into business management; and identify best practices in EHS/business integration. (Prerequisites: ESHS-720 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ESHS-780
EHS Internal Auditing
This course provides an overview of the fundamentals of EHS internal auditing, including EHS internal audit program design and management principles, management system performance evaluation and corrective action techniques, and system improvements. Exercises provide opportunities to apply knowledge. (Prerequisites: ESHS-720 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ESHS-797
Graduate Project
This course provides an opportunity for students to demonstrate their capabilities developed through their course of study to design, develop, and/or evaluate an EHS management related project culminating in a written report or manuscript and presentation. (Prerequisite: GRCS-701 or equivalent course.) Project 3 (Fall, Spring).
6
 
Professional Electives (Graduate)
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
150

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Environmental Sustainability, Health and Safety, BS degree/Environmental Health and Safety Management, MS degree (thesis option), typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CHMG-141
General & Analytical Chemistry I (General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective)
This is a general chemistry course for students in the life and physical sciences. College chemistry is presented as a science based on empirical evidence that is placed into the context of conceptual, visual, and mathematical models. Students will learn the concepts, symbolism, and fundamental tools of chemistry necessary to carry on a discourse in the language of chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between atomic structure, chemical bonds, and the transformation of these bonds through chemical reactions. The fundamentals of organic chemistry are introduced throughout the course to emphasize the connection between chemistry and the other sciences. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
CHMG-142
General & Analytical Chemistry II (General Education – Elective)
The course covers the thermodynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions. The relationship between energy and entropy change as the driving force of chemical processes is emphasized through the study of aqueous solutions. Specifically, the course takes a quantitative look at: 1) solubility equilibrium, 2) acid-base equilibrium, 3) oxidation-reduction reactions and 4) chemical kinetics. (Prerequisites: CHMG-141 or CHMG-131 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
CHMG-145
General & Analytical Chemistry I Lab (General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective)
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-141 lecture material. The course emphasizes laboratory techniques and data analysis skills. Topics include: gravimetric, volumetric, thermal, titration and spectrophotometric analyses, and the use of these techniques to analyze chemical reactions. (Corequisite: CHMG-141 or CHMG-131 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
1
CHMG-146
General & Analytical Chemistry II Lab (General Education – Elective)
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-142 lecture material. The course emphasizes the use of experiments as a tool for chemical analysis and the reporting of results in formal lab reports. Topics include the quantitative analysis of a multicomponent mixture using complexation and double endpoint titration, pH measurement, buffers and pH indicators, the kinetic study of a redox reaction, and the electrochemical analysis of oxidation reduction reactions. (Prerequisites: CHMG-131 or CHMG-141 or equivalent course. Corequisites: CHMG-142 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
1
ESHS-150
Principles of Environmental Sustainability, Health and Safety
This course presents an overview of the principles of environmental sustainability, health and safety that allows students to think critically about current environmental sustainability, health and safety issues. (This course is restricted to students in the ESHS-BS program.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ESHS-180
Greenhouse Gas Management
Climate change has been recognized as the fundamental problem of the 21st century, and the anthropogenic cause of climate change has been established. This course will introduce the scientific basis of the greenhouse effect, the global carbon cycle and climate change and will identify and explore methods used to determine an organization’s GHG output. Mechanisms used by industry, governmental organizations and commercial enterprises to remain competitive as the world transitions to a low carbon economy will be explored. Students will gain GHG inventorying skills presented in ISO 14064 and the WRI Greenhouse Gas Protocol, and will gain fundamental understanding of the causes, effects, and possible mitigation strategies for climate change. Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
MATH-161
Applied Calculus (General Education – Mathematical Perspective A)
This course is an introduction to the study of differential and integral calculus, including the study of functions and graphs, limits, continuity, the derivative, derivative formulas, applications of derivatives, the definite integral, the fundamental theorem of calculus, basic techniques of integral approximation, exponential and logarithmic functions, basic techniques of integration, an introduction to differential equations, and geometric series. Applications in business, management sciences, and life sciences will be included with an emphasis on manipulative skills. (Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH-101, MATH-111, MATH-131, NMTH-260, NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or Math Placement Exam score greater than or equal to 45.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring).
4
PHYS-111
General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective: College Physics I
This is an introductory course in algebra-based physics focusing on mechanics and waves. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton’s laws, gravitation; rotational kinematics and dynamics; work and energy; momentum and impulse; conservation laws; simple harmonic motion; waves; data presentation/analysis and error propagation. The course is taught using both traditional lectures and a workshop format that integrates material traditionally found in separate lecture, recitation, and laboratory settings. Attendance at the scheduled evening sessions of this class is required for exams. There will be 2 or 3 of these evening exams during the semester. Competency in algebra, geometry and trigonometry is required. Lab 4, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
4
UWRT-150
FYW: First-Year Writing (WI) (General Education)
Writing Seminar is a three-credit course limited to 19 students per section. The course is designed to develop first-year students’ proficiency in analytical and rhetorical reading and writing, and critical thinking. Students will read, understand, and interpret a variety of non-fiction texts representing different cultural perspectives and/or academic disciplines. These texts are designed to challenge students intellectually and to stimulate their writing for a variety of contexts and purposes. Through inquiry-based assignment sequences, students will develop academic research and literacy practices that will be further strengthened throughout their academic careers. Particular attention will be given to the writing process, including an emphasis on teacher-student conferencing, critical self-assessment, class discussion, peer review, formal and informal writing, research, and revision. Small class size promotes frequent student-instructor and student-student interaction. The course also emphasizes the principles of intellectual property and academic integrity for both current academic and future professional writing. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. (This class is restricted to incoming 1st year or global campus students.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
Second Year
BIOL-101
General Biology I (General Education – Elective)
This course serves as an introduction to cellular, molecular, and evolutionary biology. Topics will include: a study of the basic principles of modern cellular biology, including cell structure and function; the chemical basis and functions of life, including enzyme systems and gene expression; and the origin of life and evolutionary patterns of organism development on Earth. Lecture 3 (Fall, Summer).
3
BIOL-103
General Biology I Lab (General Education – Elective)
This course provides laboratory work to complement the lecture material of General Biology I. The experiments are designed to illustrate concepts of basic cellular and molecular biology, develop laboratory skills and techniques for microscopy, and improve ability to make, record and interpret observations. (Co-requisites: BIOL-101 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Summer).
1
ENGT-95
Career Seminar
This course is an introduction to the cooperative educational program at RIT, the programs in the department, and RIT resources. Topics include engineering technology vs. engineering, review of resources available at RIT, the cooperative education placement process, and the ethical expectations of employers for co-op students and RIT during a job search. Seminar 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
ESHS-201
Environmental Monitoring and Measurement I
This laboratory course provides students with skills used in geologic investigations and investigations of contaminated sites. Students will learn to describe and analyze surficial and shallow subsurface geological features, and to plan, execute, and interpret sampling events. (Prerequisites: CHMG-141 and CHMG-145 or equivalent courses.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall).
2
ESHS-210
Sustainable Earth Resources
An introduction to geology from an earth resources-economic geology prospective, focusing on sustainability of green energy resources. Basic geology topics include earth materials, internal forces, and surface processes. Environmental topics include soil and water resources. Sustainability of earth resources is explored, including strategic and industrial minerals, long-term viability of fossil fuels, and the sustainability of minerals crucial for renewable energy production and storage. The course will also explore ethical issues associated with fossil fuel use, conflict mineral extraction, the uneven distribution of benefits associated with Earth resource extraction, and the uneven distribution of negative consequences, both environmental and social, of Earth resource extraction. Scientific and ethical questions will be discussed throughout the course. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ESHS-251
Environmental Monitoring and Measurement II
This laboratory course provides students with skills used in hydrologic investigations and investigations of contaminated sites. Students will learn field skills to support surface water investigations, groundwater investigations, and investigations of contaminated sites. Students will also learn to specify sampling any chemical analysis for contaminated sites, and to use common air and water quality field analytical instruments. (Prerequisites: ESHS-201 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: ESHS-250 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Recitation 1 (Spring).
2
ESHS-290
Social Responsibility and Environmental Sustainability (WI)
This course will introduce social responsibility concepts and approaches presented in key documents like the ISO 26000 Social Responsibility Standard and the Universal Bill of Human Rights, and will explore the web of relationships in which an organization or a community exists, with the objective of providing the foundational knowledge necessary to plan a strategy for closing the gap between the activities, products and services of the organization or community and the ecosystem within which it exists. Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ESHS-300
Environmental, Health and Safety Professional Communication
Communication of environmental sustainability health and safety (ESHS) information and issues is critical for awareness, information, and action. Students develop skill in reporting and conveying ESHS and scientific information internally to the organization and externally to the public or regulating agencies. Students also gain an understanding of the role of the media and public relations in the environmental communication process. Students learn strategies and formats for communicating safety information, especially in procedures and instructional materials. Writing and speaking skills are sharpened for successful business, media and crisis communication. (Prerequisite: UWRT-150 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ESHS-310
Solid and Hazardous Waste Management
An examination of strategies and technologies to move an organization toward environmental sustainability, including resource use reduction, material substitution, process and product modification, and waste minimization; and for handling and managing wastes including treatment, storage, transport, and disposal storing solid and hazardous waste. Associated environmental impacts, regulatory concerns, technical feasibility, and costs are considered. (Prerequisites: ESHS-150 and CHMG-141 and CHMG-142 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ESHS-320
Principles of Safety
This course is an introduction to the physical and occupational safety tools and techniques and connection to sustainability. Course emphasizes safety excellence though broad application of hazard identification, control and mitigation across industry and community operations, from design to safe use, occupational and process systems. This course reviews OSHA, other regulations, consensus guidelines, and best practices that pertain to maintaining safe operations and physical locations. Management of safety is discussed: inspection, committees, written programs, reporting and agency communications. Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ESHS-360
Sustainable World Water Supply
The World Health Organization estimates that one in eight people do not have access to a safe drinking water supply. The U.S. State Department has stated that armed conflict over water rights is possible on many of the world’s river systems including the Nile, Tigris/Euphrates, Brahmaputra-Jamuna, and Mekong. What is the cause of these problems and how will changes to the hydrologic cycle and world water supply brought about by climate change affect them? Students will learn about the hydrologic cycle, the general characteristics of surface water and groundwater, and global patterns of water use. Students will learn about the health, economic, and social consequences of drought and flooding, and the effect climate change is having on water supply in arid countries. Laws and government regulation of water withdrawal and use will be covered, as will techniques to extend the available water supply. Students will consider the positive and negative consequences of increasing the sustainability of the water supply through efficiency, conservation, inter-basin transfer, water use export, grey and black water reuse, urban runoff capture, and the creation of fresh water through desalination. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ESHS-499
ESHS Co-op (summer)
ESHS Co-op. Department permission is required. (Prerequisites: ENGT-95 or equivalent course.) CO OP .
0
PHYS-112
College Physics II (General Education – Elective)
This course is an introduction to algebra-based physics focusing on thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, and elementary topics in modern physics. Topics include heat and temperature, laws of thermodynamics, electric and magnetic forces and fields, DC and AC electrical circuits, electromagnetic induction, the concept of the photon, and the Bohr model of the atom. The course is taught using both traditional lectures and a workshop format that integrates material traditionally found in separate lecture, recitation, and laboratory settings. Attendance at the scheduled evening sessions of this class is required for exams. There will be 2 or 3 of these evening exams during the semester. (Prerequisites: PHYS-111 or PHYS-211 or equivalent course.) Lab 4, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
4
Third Year
BIOL-102
General Biology II (General Education – Elective)
This course serves as an introduction to animal and plant anatomy and physiology, in addition to the fundamentals of ecology. Topics will include: animal development; animal body systems; plant development; unique plant systems; Earth's terrestrial and aquatic environments; population and community ecology; animal behavior; and conservation biology. Lecture 3 (Spring, Summer).
3
BIOL-104
General Biology II Lab (General Education – Elective)
This course provides laboratory work to complement the material of General Biology II. The experiments are designed to illustrate concepts of animal and plant anatomy and physiology, develop laboratory skills and techniques for experimenting with live organisms, and improve ability to make, record, and interpret observations. (Co-requisites: BIOL-102 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Spring, Summer).
1
ESHS-330
Industrial Wastewater Management
This course investigates characteristics and sources of industrial wastewaters, related environmental impacts, regulatory implications, and technical considerations of current treatment and disposal methodologies. Students learn to identify appropriate methods, technologies, and sequences for source reduction, treatment and pretreatment, direct discharge, and management of treatment residuals. (Prerequisites: ESHS-150 and CHMG-141 and CHMG-142 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ESHS-480
EHS Law
An overview of environmental, health and safety (EHS) related law with an emphasis on legislative law. Topics include a review of the historical and modern sources for EHS law, the emergence of administrative law and the responsibilities of the separate branches of government. Major EHS related legislation will be covered. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 4th year standing.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ESHS-499
ESHS Co-op (summer)
ESHS Co-op. Department permission is required. (Prerequisites: ENGT-95 or equivalent course.) CO OP .
0
ESHS-511
Environmental & Occupational Health
This course will provide students with the fundamentals of industrial hygiene and environmental public health, including exposure systems for various chemical, biological, and physical toxicants on individuals or within populations. Fundamentals of, monitoring and sampling, and the hierarchy of controls are covered; Determining roles and the ways in which industrial hygiene may interact with other disciplines such as public health, occupational medicine or environmental engineering are explored. When both this course and ESHS-512 lab are completed, the OSHA 40 hour HAZWOPER certificate is earned. Any non-ESHM program students may take this course without the required lab requisite with permission from the department. This course is co-listed with ESHS-611; students may receive credit for ESHS-511 or ESHS-611, not both. (Prerequisites: ESHS-150 and CHMG-141 and BIOL-101 and BIOL-103 or equivalent courses. Students may not take and receive credit for this course if they have already taken ESHS-611.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ESHS-512
Environmental & Occupational Health Lab
Weekly labs and associated reports develop skills and understanding of calibration and use of air sampling equipment and other instrumentation to assess workplace health hazards. Hands-on practical hazardous material response. Students who complete the course will receive OSHA HAZWOPER 40 hour certification. (Prerequisites: CHMG-141 or equivalent course. Co-requisite: ESHS-511 or equivalent course.) Lab 2 (Fall).
1
ESHS-525
Air Emissions Management
This course will present an overview of industrial air pollution management, its sources, methods of reduction, control, and management. Students will become familiar with the history of air pollution, the chemistry and effects of pollutants, regulations and standards, and control technologies as well as developing analytical and quantitative skills necessary in air emissions management decision-making. This course is co-listed with ESHS-615; students may receive credit for ESHS-525 or ESHS-615, not both. (Prerequisites: ESHS-150 and (CHMG-141 or CHMG-111) or equivalent courses. Students cannot take and receive credit for this course if they have taken ESHS-615.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
STAT-145
Introduction to Statistics I (General Education – Mathematical Perspective B)
This course introduces statistical methods of extracting meaning from data, and basic inferential statistics. Topics covered include data and data integrity, exploratory data analysis, data visualization, numeric summary measures, the normal distribution, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. The emphasis of the course is on statistical thinking rather than computation. Statistical software is used. (Prerequisites: Any 100 level MATH course, or NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275 or (NMTH-250 with a C- or better) or a Math Placement Exam score of at least 35.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
 
General Education – Immersion 1, 2
6
 
General Education – Elective
3
 
Open Elective
3
Fourth Year
ESHS-460
EHS Accident Causation and Prevention
Historical as well as modern accident and incident causation models and theories will be covered. Students will learn how to identify and prevent unsafe acts and conditions that can lead to accidents and incidents. The application of management system controls, including operational controls to prevent accidents and incidents, will be reviewed. In addition, students will learn how to investigate accidents and incidents. They will also learn how to develop accident and incident investigation written programs. (Prerequisites: ESHS-320 or equivalent course and at least 4th year standing in the ESHS-BS program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ESHS-499
ESHS Co-op (summer)
ESHS Co-op. Department permission is required. (Prerequisites: ENGT-95 or equivalent course.) CO OP .
0
ESHS-515
Corporate EHS Management
Presents the fundamentals of how companies manage their environmental, health and safety issues. EHS motivations and strategies for corporate ESHS management will be explored. Organizational considerations for managing corporate EHS programs will be identified. Total quality management and its applications to corporate EHS problem solving will be introduced. The basic elements of EHS management systems will be reviewed. EHS training and corporate EHS reporting will also be examined. (Prerequisites: ESHS-460 and ESHS-480 or equivalent courses and 5th year standing in the ESHS-BS program.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ESHS-720
Environmental, Health and Safety Management
This is the initial course in the curriculum core of RIT's MS degree program in Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) Management. It defines and profiles EHS management within the organization; explores EHS management history, motivations, and strategies; introduces current and developing systems for managing an organization's EHS aspects; and investigates the elements and implications of developing an organizational EHS vision and policy statement. The course's unique delivery style combines elements of distance-learning and an onsite executive-leader format. (This course is restricted to students in the EHSM-MS program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
GRCS-701
Research Methods
Understanding research and academic writing are foundational skills for all graduate students regardless of degree culmination. This is a graduate-level survey course on research design/methods and analysis, with the goal of all students becoming better consumers of research, and preparing those who choose an empirical research degree culmination and future doctoral pursuits. The course provides a broad overview of the process and practices of research in applied contexts. Content includes principles and techniques of research design, sampling, data collection, and analysis including the nature of evidence, types of research, defining research questions, sampling techniques, data collection, data analysis, issues concerning human subjects and research ethics, and challenges associated with conducting research in real-world contexts. Research strategies using library sources, including academic databases and citation management, are emphasized; as are academic writing skills, including adherence to academic style. The analysis component of the course provides an understanding of statistical methodology used to collect and interpret data found in research as well as how to read and interpret data collection instruments. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
 
General Education – Immersion 3
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
 
Open Electives
9
 
Professional Elective
3
Fifth Year
ESHS-740
EHS Management System Design
This course examines the design and development of environmental, health and safety management systems in order to implement an organization's policies and offers strategies for measurement of results in order to assess performance and ensure continual improvement. Significant team project work as well as individual work is required. (Prerequisites: ESHS-720 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ESHS-755
Corporate Social Responsibility
This course will introduce social responsibility concepts and approaches presented in key documents like the ISO 26000 Social Responsibility Standard, and will explore strategies for assisting an organization to identify and implement socially responsible initiatives appropriate to the nature and scope of its activities, products, and services. (This course is restricted to students in the EHSM-MS program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ESHS-760
Integrating EHS Management
This course examines strategies for integrating EHS systems and processes. Using case studies, the course explores interrelationships between EHS and total quality management, business value, reporting, and approaches for sustainable business development. Students will be prepared to select appropriate quality tools to improve EHS processes; identify opportunities, strategies, and tools for integrating EHS into business management; and identify best practices in EHS/business integration. (Prerequisites: ESHS-720 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
ESHS-780
EHS Internal Auditing
This course provides an overview of the fundamentals of EHS internal auditing, including EHS internal audit program design and management principles, management system performance evaluation and corrective action techniques, and system improvements. Exercises provide opportunities to apply knowledge. (Prerequisites: ESHS-720 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
ESHS-788
Thesis Planning
Students will rigorously develop their thesis research ideas, conduct literature reviews, identify and plan methodologies, prepare schedules, and gain a clear understanding of the expectations of the faculty and the discipline. Each student will be required to prepare a committee approved thesis research proposal and may begin work on their thesis. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
ESHS-790
Thesis
The graduate thesis is a formal research document that empirically relates theory with practice. A formal written thesis and oral defense are required. (Prerequisites: GRCS-701 and ESHS-788 or equivalent courses.) Thesis 5 (Fall, Spring).
3
 
Professional Electives (Graduate)
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
150

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Admissions and Financial Aid

This program is STEM designated when studying on campus and full time.

First-Year Admission

A strong performance in a college preparatory program is expected. This includes:

  • 4 years of English
  • 3 years of social studies and/or history
  • 3 years of math is required and must include algebra, geometry, and algebra 2/trigonometry. Pre-calculus is preferred.
  • 2-3 years of science. Chemistry or physics is required and biology is recommended.
  • Technology electives are preferred.

Transfer Admission

Transfer course recommendations without associate degree
Math through Calculus I, micro and macroeconomics, introductory courses in biology, chemistry, and physics

Appropriate associate degree programs for transfer
Biology, chemistry, or environmental sciences; business or public administration; liberal arts with math/science

Learn How to Apply

Financial Aid and Scholarships

100% of all incoming first-year and transfer students receive aid.

RIT’s personalized and comprehensive financial aid program includes scholarships, grants, loans, and campus employment programs. When all these are put to work, your actual cost may be much lower than the published estimated cost of attendance.
Learn more about financial aid and scholarships