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International and Global Studies BS

Benjamin Lawrance, Program Director
(585) 475-4768, bnlgla@rit.edu

Program overview

The impact of global change is dramatic and far-reaching, altering the dynamics of everyday life on a planetary scale. The international and global studies major assesses and analyzes salient issues including consumer capitalism, media culture, forms of communication, economic development, gender and health, migration, border wars, political violence, sustainable futures, and human security.

Plan of study

The major offers a range of courses from anthropology, economics, performing arts and visual culture, history, international business, linguistics, English and global literatures, modern languages and culture studies, philosophy, political science, public policy, and sociology. The major focuses on the dynamic interplay of international and supranational processes, an approach that features an integrated analysis of globalization via the dynamics of cultural, technological, media, business, monetary, diplomatic, and information exchange. Through the holistic and humanistic analysis of globalization, students consider the consequences of global processes for human rights, ethnic conflict, health, environmental sustainability, economic justice, violence and human security, and the predicaments of democracy and civil society.

Language proficiency

The major requires students to study a foreign language. RIT offers instruction in Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish. Credits for language study earned at other universities may be approved upon review. Language certification also is available for students who are proficient in a language other than English, including American Sign Language. Students are also encouraged to explore our course offering in linguistics.

Field specializations

The major offers specializations that allow students to choose a regional focus (African studies, Asian studies, European studies, Latin American studies, Middle Eastern studies, or Indigenous studies) or a topical focus (sustainable futures; global justice, peace, and conflict studies; international business; or transnational gender studies).

International experience

Students are encouraged to gain a global perspective through an international experience. This can include study abroad or an international co-op or internship. Study abroad opportunities are available in any part of the world, or students can study at one of RIT's global campuses in Croatia, Dubai, or Kosovo. Students may also fullfil the international requirement by completing an internship or co-op at an international company or with an organization that is engaged with global issues, human rights or international populations, including refugees and immigrants.

Curriculum

International and global studies, BS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
INGS-101 Global Studies 3
ANTH-210 Culture and Globalization 3
ANTH-102 Cultural Anthropology 3
  First Year Writing Seminar 3
  LAS Perspective 1, 3, 7A 9
  LAS Electives 9
  Year One: College Experience 0
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
POLS-330 Human Rights in Global Perspective 3
  Modern Language Courses (intermediate level)‡ 6
ANTH/SOCI-302 Qualitative Methods 3
  Field Specialization Elective 3
  Globalization Concentration Electives 6
STAT-145 LAS Perspective 7B: Introduction to Statistics I 3
ECON-101 LAS Perspective 4: Microeconomics 3
  LAS Immersion 1 3
Choose one of the following:  
   INGS-597    Study Abroad§  
   INGS-598    Internship§  
Third Year
Choose one of the following: 3
   ECON-201    Principles of Macroeconomics  
   ECON-405    International Trade and Finance  
   ECON-406    Global Economic Issues  
   ECON-432    Open Economic Macroeconomics  
   ECON-448    Development Economics  
   ECON-449    Comparative Economic Systems  
  Modern Language Course (advanced level) 1‡ 3
  Globalization Concentration Elective 3
  Field Specialization Electives 6
  Advanced Study Course 3
ISTE-105 Web Foundations 3
  LAS Immersion 2, 3 6
  LAS Perspective 5** 3
Fourth Year
INGS-501x Capstone Seminar (WI) 3
  Field Specialization Elective 3
  Advanced Study Course 3
  LAS Perspectives 2, 6 6
  LAS Electives 9
  Free Electives 6
Total Semester Credit Hours 120

Please see New General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two Wellness courses.

‡ Modern language courses: Students without prior proficiency in a foreign language should take the beginning level language sequence as prerequisite(s) for the intermediate level in the LAS electives.

§ After the first year, students are required to complete an international experience by choosing either a study abroad experience or an internship or co-op. The requirement may be completed during the summer or during the academic year.

** Students will satisfy this requirement by taking either a 3 or 4 credit hour lab science course. If a science course consists of separate lecture and laboratory sections, the student must take both the lecture and lab portions to satisfy the requirement.

Field specializations
African studies
ANTH-225 Globalizing Africa
ANTH-275 Global Islam
ANTH-310 Popular Cultures in the Global South
ANTH-345 Genocide and Post-conflict Justice
ANTH-410 Global Cities
SOCI-210 African American Culture
SOCI-315 Global Exiles of War and Terror
FNRT-323 Survey of African American Music
HIST-245 American Slavery and Freedom
INGS-210/HIST-210 Culture and Politics in Urban Africa
INGS-310/HIST-310 Global Slavery and Human Trafficking
Asian studies
ANTH-275 Global Islam
HIST-160 History of Modern East Asia
HIST-252 The U.S. and Japan
HIST-260 History of Pre-modern China
HIST-261 History of Modern China
HIST-265 History of Modern Japan
HIST-266 History of Pre-modern Japan
HIST-351 The Vietnam War
HIST-365 Conflict in Modern East Asia
HIST-450 Modern Japan in History, Fiction, and Film
HIST-462 East-West Encounters
HIST-465 Samurai in Word and Image
MLJP-497 Langauges in Japanese Society
PHIL-311 East Asian Philosophy
POLS-350 Politics of East Asia
European studies
ANTH-275 Global Islam
ANTH-340 Divided Europe (WI)
ANTH-380 Nationalism and Identity
ENGL-416 Topics in Global Literatures: Irish Literature
ENGL-416 Topics in Global Literatures: Italian Literature
ENGL-416 Topics in Global Literatures: Russian Literature
HIST-170 20th Century Europe
HIST-270 History of Modern France
HIST-280 History of Modern Germany
HIST-369 Histories of Christianity
INGS-310/HIST-310 Global Slavery and Human Trafficking
MLFR-351 French Film and Hollywood
MLGR-351 German Culture Through Film
MLIT-449 Ilatian Cinema from Neorealism to the New Millennium
PHIL-201 Ancient Philosophy
PHIL-203 Modern Philosophy
PHIL-408 Critical Social Theory
PHIL-409 Existentialism
PHIL-410 Medieval Philosophy
PHIL-412 19th Century Philosophy
PHIL-417 Continental European Philosophy
Global justice, peace and conflict issues
ANTH-330 Cultural Images of War (WI)
ANTH-345 Genocide and Post-conflict Justice
HIST-251 Modern U.S. Foreign Relations
HIST-351 The Vietnam War
HIST-410 Terrorism, Intelligence, and War
HIST-470 Science, Technology, and Empire
INGS-310/HIST-310 Global Slavery and Human Trafficking
MLSP-352 Trauma and Survival in the First Person Narrative
PHIL-304 Philosophy of Law
PHIL-305 Philosophy of Peace
PHIL-403 Social and Political Philosophy
POLS-295 Cyberpolitics
POLS-325 International Law and Organizations
POLS-440 War and the State
POLS-445 Terrorism and Political Violence
SOCI-250 Globalization and Security
SOCI-315 Global Exiles of War and Terror
Indigenous studies
ANTH-220 Language and Culture
ANTH-260 Native North Americans
ANTH-265 Native Americans in Film
ANTH-285 American Indian Languages
ANTH-310 Popular Cultures in the Global South
ANTH-335 Culture and Politics in Latin America
ANTH-375 Natuve American Cultural Resources and Rights
ANTH-420 Visual Anthropology
ANTH-455/ECON-452/INGS-455 Economics of Native America
International Business
ECON-405 International Trade and Finance
ECON-406 Global Economic Issues
HIST-380 International Business History
INTB-225 Globalization
INTB-300 Cross-cultural Management
INTB-310 Regional Business Studiues
INTB-320 Global Marketing
INTB-489 Seminar in International Business
INTB-550 Global Entry and Competition Strategies
MKTG-230 Principles of Marketing
Latin American studies
ANTH-235 Immigration to the U.S.
ANTH-285 American Indian Languages
ANTH-315 Archaeology of Cities
ANTH-335 Culture and Politics in Latin America
ANTH-350 Global Economy and the Grassroots
ANTH-410 Global Cities
ENGL-416 Topics in Global Literatures: Caribbean Literature
ENGL-416 Topics in Global Literatures: Latin American Literature
ENGL-416 Topics in Global Literatures: Latino Experience in Literature
INGS-310/HIST-310 Global Slavery and Human Trafficking
MLSP-351 Gender and Sexuality in Hispanic Studies
MLSP-352 Caribbean Cinema
MLSP-353 Trauma and Survival in the First Person Narrative
POLS-335 Politics in Developing Countries
Middle Eastern studies
ANTH-240 Muslim Youth Cultures
ANTH-255 Regional Archaeology: Middle East
ANTH-275 Global Islam
ANTH-310 Archaeology of Cities
ANTH-365 Culture and Politics in the Middle East
ENGL-425 Global Cinema: Iranian Literature and Film
POLS-335 Politics in Developing Countries
Sustainable futures
ANTH-270/INGS-270 Cuisine, Culture, and Power
ANTH-280 Sustainable Development
ANTH-285 American Indian Languages
ANTH-410 Global Cities
ECON-448 Development Economies
ISTE-348 Geographic Information Systems
ISTE-383 Introduction to Geospatial Technologies
PHIL-308 Environmental Philosophy
POLS-335 Politics in Developing Countries
SOCI-250 Globalization and Security
SOCI-255 Disaster, Public Health Crisis, and Global Responses
SOCI-320 Population and Society
STSO-220 Environment and Society
STSO-330 Energy and the Environment
STSO-341 Biomedical Issues: Science and Technology
STSO-441 Cyborg Theory: (Re)thinking the Human Experience in the 21st Century
Transnational Gender Studies
ANTH-290 Language and Sexuality
ANTH-325 Bodies and Culture
ANTH-425 Global Sexualities
ECON-451 Economics of Women and the Family
ENGL-414 Topics in Women's and Gender Studies
FNRT-206 Queer Looks
MLSP-351 Gender and Sexuality in Hispanic Studies
PHIL-309 Feminist Theory
SOCI-235 Women, Work, and Culture
SOCI-245 Gender and Health
STSO-342 Gender, Science, and Technology

Accelerated dual degree option

Accelerated dual degree options are available for outstanding undergraduate students who wish to earn both a bachelor's and a master's degree in approximately six years. 

International and global studies, BS degree/Science, technology and public policy, MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
INGS-101 Global Studies 3
POLS-110 American Politics 3
  First Year LAS Elective 3
  LAS Perspective 1, 3, 7A 9
  First Year Writing Seminar 3
ANTH-210 Culture and Globalization 3
ACSC-010 Year One: College Experience 0
  LAS Elective 3
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
POLS-330 Human Rights in Global Perspective 3
  Modern Language Intermediate I, II 6
SOCI-302 Qualitative Methods 3
ECON-101 Principles of Microeconomics 3
  Globalization Concentration Courses 6
STAT-145 LAS Perspective 7B: Introduction to Statistics I 3
  Field Specialization Course 3
  LAS Immersion 1 3
Third Year
ECON-449 Comparative Economic Systems 3
ISTE-105 Web Foundations 3
  Modern Language Advanced I 3
  LAS Immersions 2, 3 6
  Field Specialization Electives 6
  Globalization Concentration Course 3
  LAS Perspective 5 3
  Advanced Study Option 3
Fourth Year
INGS-501 Capstone Seminar (WI) 3
  Advanced Study Option 3
  LAS Perspective 2, 6 6
  Field Specialization Elective 3
PUBL-700 Readings In Public Policy 3
PUBL-701 Graduate Policy Analysis 3
PUBL-702 Graduate Decision Analysis 3
STSO-740 Science, Technology and Policy  
PUBL-703 Program Evaluation and Research Design  
Fifth Year
  Public Policy Electives 9
  LAS Elective 3
  Free Electives 6
Choose one of the following: 6
     Thesis Research  
       Graduate Electives, Comprehensive Exam  
Total Semester Credit Hours 144

Please see New General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor’s degrees are required to complete two Wellness courses.

‡ Students will satisfy this requirement by taking either a 3 or 4 credit hour lab science course. If a science course consists of separate lecture and laboratory sections, students must take both the lecture and lab portions to satisfy the requirement.

Additional information

Faculty

Faculty members have distinguished records of research in Latin America, the Caribbean, China, Japan, Korea, West and North Africa, the Middle East, Native North America, and Europe. A number have teaching experience abroad; collaborate with transnational teams on issues of human trafficking, genocide, political violence, environmental sustainability, and global justice; and have achieved international recognition through prestigious grants, fellowships, and publications.

Career opportunities

Students are well-prepared to pursue careers in government, diplomatic or security service, international business, and not-for-profit initiatives. Graduates also are prepared for competitive graduate programs in fields as diverse as international law, international development, global education, administration, public policy, and the social sciences.




Effective fall 2013, RIT converted its academic calendar from quarters to semesters.
View this program's information from the retired quarter calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT converted its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.
 

Program overview

The bachelor of science in international studies highlights interdisciplinary approaches to the analysis of global processes, such as the impact of globalization on local communities, regions, and environments and how people in different parts of the world can promote equitable and sustainable development in the future. The program seeks to educate a new generation of global citizens who will acquire the expertise to assess and analyze salient issues such as flexible capitalism, consumer culture, economic opportunities, international migration, international politics, social change, violence, and terrorism. The program prepares graduates for careers that demand an understanding of the social, economic, political, humanitarian, and environmental issues that are central to globalization.

Curriculum

The program offers a range of courses that include political science, economics, anthropology, international business, public policy, sociology, history, and modern language and culture studies. This diversity offers a solid education in international studies, but also introduces students to cutting-edge knowledge and expertise in global issues and world problems that will boost career opportunities.

A unique aspect of the program is the wide choice of specialization options. Students may choose a specific geographical or cultural focus for their studies–for example, Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East or Indigenous Studies–or they may opt to explore topical specialties such as sustainable futures; global justice, peace, and conflict studies; international business; or transnational gender studies. A field specialization allows students to gain in-depth knowledge of the social, political, and cultural dimensions of a particular part of the world and also to develop career expertise. Modern language study provides critical inter-cultural communication skills necessary for success in any career.

International experience

The program encourages students to participate in an international experience, which includes study abroad opportunities and/or internships. Students have lived and studied in diverse locations such as Japan, Australia, Senegal, France, Denmark, Italy, Spain, Brazil, and Costa Rica, to name a few. A number of students have worked as interns under the supervision of human rights lawyers for the New York State Division of Human Rights in Rochester and for the United Nations Association of Rochester.

Semester conversion
Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. Each program and its associated courses have been sent to the New York State Department of Education for approval of the semester plan. For reference, the following charts illustrate the typical course sequence for this program in both quarters and semesters. Students should consult their academic advisers with questions regarding planning and course selection.

Program title change
Effective fall 2013, the international studies program will be renamed international and global studies. This change will not affect currently matriculated students.

International studies, BS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

Course Qtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
  Liberal Arts* 12
  Mathematics and Science Requirement‡ 7-8
  Foreign Language Requirement 12
0524-210 Global Studies 4
0513-214 Introduction to International Relations 4
0507-441 Modern U.S. Foreign Relations 4
0510-440 Cultures in Globalization 4
1720-050, 052 Discovery and Pathways 2
  Wellness Education† 0
Second Year
Choose one of the following courses: 4
   0511-449    Comparative Economic Systems  
   0511-454    International Trade and Finance  
  Liberal Arts* 12
  Globalization Core Elective 4
1016-319, 320 Data Analysis I and II 10
  Foreign Language Requirement 12
4002-206 Web Foundations 4
  Wellness Education† 0
Third Year
  International Studies Track 8
  Foreign Language Requirement 12
0515-406 Qualitative Methods 4
  Liberal Arts* 12
  Science Requirement‡ 3
  Open Electives 8
  International Experience 0
Fourth Year
  International Studies Track 8
0524-501 Capstone Seminar 4
  Liberal Arts* 16
  Open Electives 12
Total Quarter Credit Hours 180 required

* Please see Liberal Arts General Education Requirements for more information.

† Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

‡ Please see Mathematics and Science General Education Curriculum.

International and global studies, BS degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
INGS-101 Global Studies 3
ANTH-210 Culture and Globalization 3
  LAS Foundation 1: First-Year Seminar 3
ENGL-150 LAS Foundation 2: Writing Seminar 3
  LAS Perspective 1 3
ANTH-102 LAS Perspective 3: Cultural Anthropology 3
POLS-101 Introduction to International Relations 3
MATH-100 LAS Perspective 7A: College Algebra 3
  LAS Electives 3
  Modern Language (beginning level) 1, 2† 6
  Wellness Education* 0
Second Year
POLS-330 Human Rights in Global Perspective 3
  Modern Language (intermediate level) 1, 2† 6
SOCI-302 Qualitative Research 3
  Field Specialization Elective 3
  Globalization Concentration Electives 6
STAT-145 LAS Perspectives 7B: Introduction to Statistics I 3
ECON-101 LAS Perspective 4: Principles of Microeconomics 3
  LAS Immersion 1 3
Choose one of the following:  
   INGS-597    Study Abroad‡  
   INGS-598    Internship‡  
Third Year
ECON-449 Comparative Economic Systems 3
MLxx-401 Modern Language (advanced level) 1† 3
  Globalization Concentration Elective 3
  Field Specialization Electives 6
  Advanced Study Option 1 3
ISTE-105 Web Foundations 3
  LAS Immersion 2 (WI), 3 6
  LAS Perspective 5 3
Fourth Year
INGS-501 Capstone Seminar (WI) 3
  Field Specialization Elective 3
  Advanced Study Option 2 3
  LAS Perspective 2, 6 6
  LAS Electives 9
  Free Electives 6
Total Semester Credit Hours 120

Please see New General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information.

† Modern language: Students without prior proficiency in a foreign language should take the beginning level language sequence as prerequisite(s) for the intermediate level in the LAS electives.

‡ After the first year, students are required to complete an international experience by choosing either a study abroad experience or an internship or co-op. The requirement may be completed during the summer or during the academic year.

Additional information

Career opportunities

Students are prepared for positions in state and federal agencies, private enterprise, and various non-profit organizations. In addition, students are also well-prepared for graduate studies in fields such as international law, international development, public policy, and social sciences.