Computing Security Master of science degree

6603d304-22a8-417b-b239-784a6a0bc73c | 90579

Overview

Online Option

Develop a solid foundation in cyber security as you understand how integrated systems are designed and developed, and the leadership skills that are paramount for guiding an industry that’s still exploring its role and impact in society.


There is critical importance to building security and survivability into the hardware and software of computing systems as they are designed and developed, rather than trying to add it on once these systems have been designed, developed, and installed. The MS in computing security gives students an understanding of the technological and ethical roles of computing security in today's society and its importance across the breadth of computing disciplines. This cybersecurity masters enables students to develop a strong theoretical and practical foundation in secure computing, preparing them for leadership positions in the computing security industry, academia, or research careers, or to pursue a more advanced degree in a computing discipline.

The program is designed for students who have an undergraduate computing degree in an area such as computing security, computer science, information technology, networking, or software engineering, as well as those who have a strong background in a field in which computers are applied, such as computer or electrical engineering. The program is offered online and on campus.

The curriculum consists of three required core courses, up to 6 technical electives (depending on the capstone option chosen), and a thesis, project, or capstone course for a total of 30 semester credit hours.

Electives

Students can develop a specialization in one of several security-related areas by selecting technical electives under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Students are required to choose up to six technical electives.

Industries


  • Internet and Software

  • Computer Networking

  • Government (Local, State, Federal)

  • Defense

Typical Job Titles

DevOps and Security Engineer Technology Analyst
Cyberphysical Systems Engineer Incidence Response Consultant
Network Systems Engineer Security Analyst

92%

outcome rate of graduates

$84k

median first-year salary of graduates

Latest News

  • November 18, 2019

    Man stands outsite of builing near windows.

    A conversation with Steve Hoover

    Steve Hoover, who was recently named the Katherine Johnson Executive Director of RIT’s new Global Cybersecurity Institute, is bringing together academia and industry to help tackle the world’s cybersecurity problems.

  • November 8, 2019

    American soldier stands on roadside with mountains in background.

    Q&A: Computing security lecturer and Army Reservist Justin Pelletier

    RIT computing security lecturer Justin Pelletier is back to his regular office hours this semester, after taking part in a six-month-long military tour in Afghanistan earlier this year. As an Army Reserve counterintelligence officer, Pelletier traveled across Afghanistan and was based in the special operations headquarters, helping to assess and counter foreign threats.

Curriculum

Computing Security (thesis option), MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CSEC-604
Cryptography and Authentication
In this course, students will learn in depth knowledge of cryptography and authentication. Students will explore various cryptography algorithms, authentication protocols, and their design and implementation. Students will work on a project to implement a cryptographic algorithm and/or an authentication protocol. The applications of cryptography and authentications in the areas of computer networks and systems and information assurance will also be investigated.
3
CSEC-742
Computer System Security
The importance of effective security policies and procedures coupled with experience and practice is emphasized and reinforced through research and practical assignments. Organization and management of security discipline and response to threats is studied. Case studies of effective and failed security planning and implementation will be examined and analyzed. The issues influencing proper and appropriate planning for security and response to attacks will be studied. To be successful in this course students should be knowledgeable in networking, systems, and security technologies.
3
 
Research Electives
6
 
Advanced Electives
6
Second Year
CSEC-790
MS Thesis
This course is a capstone course in the MS in computing security program. It offers students the opportunity to investigate a selected topic and make an original contribution which extends knowledge within the computing security domain. As part of their original work students will write and submit for publication an article to a peer reviewed journal or conference. Students must submit an acceptable proposal to a thesis committee (chair, reader, and observer) before they may be registered by the department for the MS Thesis. Students must defend their work in an open thesis defense and complete a written report of their work before a pass/fail grade is awarded.
6
 
Advanced Electives
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
30

Computing Security (project option), MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CSEC-604
Cryptography and Authentication
In this course, students will learn in depth knowledge of cryptography and authentication. Students will explore various cryptography algorithms, authentication protocols, and their design and implementation. Students will work on a project to implement a cryptographic algorithm and/or an authentication protocol. The applications of cryptography and authentications in the areas of computer networks and systems and information assurance will also be investigated.
3
CSEC-742
Computer System Security
The importance of effective security policies and procedures coupled with experience and practice is emphasized and reinforced through research and practical assignments. Organization and management of security discipline and response to threats is studied. Case studies of effective and failed security planning and implementation will be examined and analyzed. The issues influencing proper and appropriate planning for security and response to attacks will be studied. To be successful in this course students should be knowledgeable in networking, systems, and security technologies.
3
 
Research Electives
6
 
Advanced Electives
6
Second Year
CSEC-791
MS Project
This course is a capstone course in the MS in computing security program. It offers students the opportunity to investigate a selected topic within the computing security domain. The student may complete a project for real world application or in a laboratory environment. Students must submit an acceptable proposal to a project committee (chair, and reader) before they may be registered by the department for the MS project. Students must defend their work in an open project defense and complete a written report of their work before a letter grade is awarded.
3
 
Advanced Electives
9
Total Semester Credit Hours
30

Computing Security (capstone course option), MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CSEC-604
Cryptography and Authentication
In this course, students will learn in depth knowledge of cryptography and authentication. Students will explore various cryptography algorithms, authentication protocols, and their design and implementation. Students will work on a project to implement a cryptographic algorithm and/or an authentication protocol. The applications of cryptography and authentications in the areas of computer networks and systems and information assurance will also be investigated.
3
CSEC-742
Computer System Security
The importance of effective security policies and procedures coupled with experience and practice is emphasized and reinforced through research and practical assignments. Organization and management of security discipline and response to threats is studied. Case studies of effective and failed security planning and implementation will be examined and analyzed. The issues influencing proper and appropriate planning for security and response to attacks will be studied. To be successful in this course students should be knowledgeable in networking, systems, and security technologies.
3
 
Research Electives
6
 
Advanced Electives
6
Second Year
CSEC-793
Capstone for Computing Security
Students will apply their knowledge learned through the program to solve real world problems various areas of computing security. Large size projects will be defined for students to work on throughout the semester. At the end of semester students will present their results and demonstrate their knowledge and skills in problem solving and critical thinking in a setting open to the public.
3
 
Advanced Electives
9
Total Semester Credit Hours
30

Admission Requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS in computing security, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

  • Complete a graduate application.
  • Hold a baccalaureate degree (or equivalent) from an accredited university or college in computing security, computer science, software engineering, information technology, networking, computer engineering, electrical engineering, applied mathematics, or computer engineering technology (exceptional students from other fields may be admitted on a contingent basis).
  • Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
  • Have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (or equivalent).
  • Submit a minimum of two recommendations from individuals who are well-qualified to assess the applicant’s potential for success.
  • International applicants must submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE).
  • International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE. A minimum TOEFL score of 88 (internet-based) is required. A minimum IELTS score of 6.5 is required. The English language test score requirement is waived for native speakers of English or for those submitting transcripts from degrees earned at American institutions.

Prerequisites

Applicants must satisfy prerequisite requirements in mathematics (integral calculus, discrete mathematics), statistics, natural sciences (physics, chemistry, etc.), and computing (programming, computer networking theory and practice, and systems administration theory and practice).

Bridge program

Students whose undergraduate preparation or employment experience does not satisfy the prerequisites required for the program may make up deficiencies through additional study. Bridge course work, designed to close gaps in a student's preparation, can be completed either before or after enrolling in the program as advised by the graduate program director. Generally, formal acceptance into the program is deferred until the applicant has made significant progress through this additional preparation.

If completed through academic study, bridge courses must be completed with a grade of B (3.0) or better. Courses with lower grades must be repeated. Bridge courses are not counted toward the 30 credit hours required for the master's degree. However, grades earned from bridge courses taken at RIT are included in a student's graduate grade point average.

A bridge program can be designed in different ways. Courses may be substituted based upon availability, and courses at other colleges may be applied. All bridge course work must be approved in advance by the graduate program director.

Learn about admissions and financial aid 

Additional Info

Faculty

The program faculty are actively engaged in consulting and research in various areas of secure computing and information assurance, such as cryptography, databases, networking, secure software development, and critical infrastructure security. There are opportunities for students to participate in research activities towards capstone completion or as independent study work.

Maximum time limit

University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.