Lauren Hall Headshot

Lauren Hall

Associate Professor
Department of Political Science
College of Liberal Arts

585-475-6827
Office Location

Lauren Hall

Associate Professor
Department of Political Science
College of Liberal Arts

Education

BA, State University of New York at Binghamton; MA, Ph.D., Northern Illinois University

585-475-6827

Currently Teaching

POLS-365
3 Credits
This course examines the way in which new technologies challenge and provide alternatives to traditional political structures and functions. The course discusses the moral status of the state through the lens of anarchic political thought, with an emphasis on the concept of consent. Themes of anarchic thought are then discussed in light of how new technologies decentralize power and challenge traditional state goals, such as regulation or state secrecy. Technologies to be discussed include social media platforms and nongovernmental, digital currency, as well as decentralized energy sources like solar and wind. The ethical and moral implications of these new technologies, the harms and benefits they present, and their use as challenges to the moral status of the state are all central themes.
POLS-530
3 Credits
This seminar provides an opportunity to study in-depth any theme, problem or work within the discipline of political science, for example the foundations of self-government, foreign policy, international law and organizations, and the fundamental problems of international relations. Course content will be determined in consultation with the instructor. Teams of students will write a substantial paper on a topic related to the general themes of the seminar.
POLS-115
3 Credits
This course examines past and contemporary political and ethical debates that have shaped, clarified and transformed the meaning of the foundations of the American democratic-republic. At every turn, political and ethical debates in American politics have focused on the meaning of the principles of equality and consent and the moral implications of individual rights. The course will address topics such as the moral foundations of the Founding, the moral character of the Union, the injustice of slavery in a regime dedicated to the principle of equality, justice and the Civil Rights movement, and the progressive critique of the Founding, the rise of the entitlement state and its critiques, as well as current political and ethical controversies. Special attention will be paid to the political speeches of those directly involved in the debates.
POLS-340
3 Credits
This course provides health sciences and other students with a background in the changing face of medical ethics over the last two hundred years. The course combines medical history, historical and contemporary biomedical ethics, philosophy of science, and political theory to create a framework for understanding the complexity and depth of the practitioner/patient relationship. At the end of the course, students will explore and interrogate the way in which the practical, ethical, legal, and political framework of modern American medicine supports or challenges foundational medical principles like patient autonomy and the Hippocratic Oath. Resources include works by William Osler on humanistic medicine as well as other foundational medical thinkers, classic works in bioethics, and historical and narrative accounts of the consequences of medical abuse. Examples of possible texts include archival documents related to the eugenics movement in 20th century America, letters and testimony from survivors of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, and contemporary texts and court cases that interrogate the connection between medical practice and human values and meaning.
POLS-415
3 Credits
This course examines the evolutionary approach to law. The course will consider the relevance of evolutionary theory to the analysis of law, the roots of rule of law, the relationship between natural law and common law, as well as the strengths and limitations of the evolutionary approach to specific themes within law, such as property law and family law.

In the News

Select Scholarship

Journal Paper
Hall, Lauren K. and Randy Hebert, MD. "“Palliative Care and the Tragedy of the Commons”." Journal of Palliative Care March 5, 2020, online. (2020): N/A. Web.
Hall, Lauren K. "Guiding the Invisible Hand: Spontaneous Orders and the Problem of Character"." Cosmos+Taxis 2. 1 (2014): 34-44. Print.
Hall, Lauren K. "Political Graveyards: The Political Significance of Burial and Remembrance." Society 48. 4 (2011): 316-322. Print.
Hall, Lauren K. "Rights and the Heart: Emotions and Rights Claims in the Political Theory of Edmund Burke." Review of Politics 73. (2011): 1-23. Print.
Full Length Book
Hall, Lauren K. The Medicalization of Birth and Death. 1 ed. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2019. Print.
Hall, Lauren K. Family and the Politics of Moderation: Private Life, Public Goods, and the Rebirth of Social Individualism. Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2014. Print.
Hall, Lauren K. and Paul Seaton. Lucid Mind, Intrepid Spirit: Essays on the Thought of Chantal Delsol. 1st ed. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2012. Print.
Book Chapter
Hall, Lauren K. "Burke’s Liberalism: Prejudice, Habit, and Affections and the Remaking of the Social Contract." Reclaiming Liberalism. New York, New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2019. 100-130. Print.
Hall, Lauren K. "“The Ninth Amendment and Substantive Due Process: Sterilization, Reproductive Rights, and the Path "‹Not Taken.”." American Constitutionalism, Marriage, and the Family: Obergefell v. Hodges "‹and U.S. v. Windsor in Context. Ed. Patrick Cain and David Ramsey, eds.. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2016. 5-100. Print.
Hall, Lauren K. "Two Invisible Hands: Family, Markets, and the Adam Smith Problem"." Propriety and Prosperity: New Studies on the Philosophy of Adam Smith. London, UK: Palgrave MacMillan, 2014. 240-253. Print.
Hall, Lauren K. "John Locke, Charles Darwin, and the Social Individualism of Virtue." The Science of Modern Virtue. Dekalb, IL: Northern Illinois University Press, 2013. 128-143. Print.