Applied Mathematics Bachelor of science degree

148d2e58-9baf-4095-8bdc-182a8557517e | 85987

Overview

A focus on the study of problems that can be mathematically analyzed and solved, including models for perfecting global positioning systems, analyzing cost-effectiveness in manufacturing processes, or improving digital encryption software.


Applied mathematicians develop models for perfecting global positioning systems, analyzing cost-effectiveness in manufacturing processes, or improving digital encryption software. The applied mathematics major focuses on the study and solution of problems that can be mathematically analyzed across industrial fields and research disciplines.

The applied mathematics major focuses on the study and solution of problems that can be mathematically analyzed. Industry, academia, and government all have a great need for individuals with this type of education. You will gain the knowledge and skills to collaborate on complex problems with scientists, engineers, computer specialists, or other analysts. Some application areas include applied statistics; biology; business; economics; chemistry; electrical, industrial, or mechanical engineering; operations research; and imaging science.

Graduates typically are employed in scientific, engineering, business, or government environments, applying their mathematics background to the analysis and solution of real-world problems.

Course of Study

You can choose courses from one more than twenty application areas that provide them with the knowledge and skills to collaborate on complex problems with scientists, engineers, computer specialists, or other analysts. Some of those areas include applied statistics; biology; business; economics; chemistry; electrical, industrial, or mechanical engineering; operations research; or imaging science.

Real World Experiences

You’ll collaborate with faculty researcher on a variety of projects in both applied and theoretical mathematics providing you with valuable exposure to real-world problems faced by America's top companies and research organization. As a result, RIT undergraduates in mathematics are highly-sought as co-op employees.

You’ll also have the opportunity to work with researchers in the School of Mathematical Sciences studying interesting problems in areas such as computational photonics, mathematical biology, microelectromechanical systems, and network analysis.

Nature of Work

Mathematicians use theory, computational techniques, algorithms, and the latest computer technology to solve economic, scientific, engineering, physics, and business problems. The work of mathematicians falls into two broad classes — theoretical (pure) mathematics and applied mathematics. These classes, however, often overlap. Applied mathematicians start with a practical problem, envision its separate elements, and then reduce the elements to mathematical variables. They often use computers to analyze relationships among the variables, and they solve complex problems by developing models with alternative solutions.

Training Qualifications

Industry, academia, and government all have a great need for individuals with this type of education. Typically, graduates are employed in scientific, engineering, business, or government environments, applying their mathematics background to the analysis and solution of real-world problems.

In the federal government, entry-level job candidates usually must have a four-year degree with a major in mathematics or a four-year degree with the equivalent of a mathematics major. Outside the federal government, a graduate-level education is usually a minimum requirement; many seek advanced degrees in mathematics or a related discipline. However, those with bachelor's degrees who meet state certification requirements may become primary or secondary school mathematics teachers.

The majority of those with a master's degree in mathematics who work in private industry do so not as mathematicians but in related fields. For jobs in applied mathematics, training in the field in which mathematics will be used is very important. Mathematics is used extensively in physics, actuarial science, statistics, engineering, and operations research. Computer science, business and industrial management, economics, finance, chemistry, geology, life sciences, and behavioral sciences are likewise dependent on applied mathematics. Mathematicians also should have substantial knowledge of computer programming, because most complex mathematical computation and much mathematical modeling are done on a computer.

Industries


  • Internet and Software

  • Investment/Portfolio Management

  • Insurance

  • Government (Local, State, Federal)

  • Defense

  • Scientific and Technical Consulting

  • Biotech and Life Sciences

  • Telecommunications

Typical Job Titles

Engineer Economist
Analyst (e.g. Operations Research) Physicist
Cryptanalyst (codes) Actuary
Teacher Market Researcher
Financial Advisor

Latest News

Curriculum

Applied mathematics, BS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MATH-181
LAS Perspective 7A (mathematical): Project-based Calculus I
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals.
4
MATH-182
LAS Perspective 7B (mathematical): Project-based Calculus II
This is the second in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates.
4
MATH-199
Mathematics and Statistics Seminar
This course introduces the programs within the School of Mathematical Sciences, and provides an introduction to math and statistics software. The course provides practice in technical writing.
1
CSCI-101
Principles of Computing
This course is designed to introduce students to the central ideas of computing. Students will engage in activities that show how computing changes the world and impacts daily lives. Students will develop step-by-step written solutions to basic problems and implement their solutions using a programming language. Assignments will be completed both individually and in small teams. Students will be required to demonstrate oral and written communication skills through such assignments as short papers, homeworks, group discussions and debates, and development of a term paper.
3
CSCI-141
Computer Science I
This course serves as an introduction to computational thinking using a problem-centered approach. Specific topics covered include: expression of algorithms in pseudo code and a programming language; functional and imperative programming techniques; control structures; problem solving using recursion; basic searching and sorting; elementary data structures such as lists, trees, and graphs; and correctness, testing and debugging. Assignments (both in class and for homework) requiring a pseudo code solution and an implementation are an integral part of the course. An end-of-term project is also required.
4
ACSC-010
Year One
The Year One class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, personal success, leadership development, social responsibility and life academic skills awareness and application. Year One is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build relationships and help them become an integral part of the campus community.
0
 
First Year LAS Elective
3
 
First Year Writing (WI)
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
LAS Perspective 5‡ (natural science inquiry)
4
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
MATH-200
Discrete Mathematics with Introduction to Proofs
This course prepares students for professions that use mathematics in daily practice, and for mathematics courses beyond the introductory level where it is essential to communicate effectively in the language of mathematics. It covers various methods of mathematical proof, starting with basic techniques in propositional and predicate calculus and set theory, and then moving to applications in advanced mathematics.
3
MATH-221
Multivariable and Vector Calculus
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes a study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, Stokes' Theorem, Green's Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-219.
4
MATH-251
Probability and Statistics I
This course introduces sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability and independence, distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions (discrete and continuous), the central limit theorem, descriptive statistics, interval estimation, and applications of probability and statistics to real-world problems. A statistical package such as Minitab or R is used for data analysis and statistical applications.
3
MATH-252
Probability and Statistics II
This course covers basic statistical concepts, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, point estimation, and simple linear regression. The statistical software package MINITAB will be used for data analysis and statistical applications.
3
MATH-231
Differential Equations
This course is an introduction to the study of ordinary differential equations and their applications. Topics include solutions to first order equations and linear second order equations, method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, linear independence and the Wronskian, vibrating systems, and Laplace transforms.
3
MATH-241
Linear Algebra
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of linear algebra, and techniques of matrix manipulation. Topics include linear transformations, Gaussian elimination, matrix arithmetic, determinants, vector spaces, linear independence, basis, null space, row space, and column space of a matrix, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, change of basis, similarity and diagonalization. Various applications are studied throughout the course.
3
MATH-399
Mathematical Science Job Search Seminar
This course helps students prepare to search for co-op or full-time employment. Students will learn strategies for conducting a successful job search and transitioning into the work world. The course meets one hour each week for five weeks.
0
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
 
LAS Perspective 6‡ (scientific principles)
4
Third Year
MATH-431
Real Variables I
This course is an investigation and extension of the theoretical aspects of elementary calculus. Topics include mathematical induction, real numbers, sequences, functions, limits, and continuity. The workshop will focus on helping students develop skill in writing proofs.
3
 
Program Electives
18
 
LAS Immersion 1, 2
6
 
Open Elective
3
Fourth Year
MATH-421
Mathematical Modeling (WI)
This course explores problem solving, formulation of the mathematical model from physical considerations, solution of the mathematical problem, testing the model and interpretation of results. Problems are selected from the physical sciences, engineering, and economics.
3
MATH-441
Abstract Algebra 
This course covers basic set theory, number theory, groups, subgroups, cyclic and permutation groups, Lagrange and Sylow theorems, quotient groups, and isomorphism theorems. Group Theory finds applications in other scientific disciplines like physics and chemistry.
3
MATH-411
Numerical Analysis
This course covers numerical techniques for the solution of nonlinear equations, interpolation, differentiation, integration, and the solution of initial value problems.
3
 
LAS Immersion 3
3
 
LAS Electives
6
 
Program Electives
6
 
Open Electives
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
121

Please see General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

‡ Students will satisfy this requirement by taking either a 3 or 4 credit hour lab science course. If a science course consists of separate lecture and laboratory sections, students must take both the lecture and lab portions to satisfy the requirement.

Accelerated dual degree option

Accelerated dual degree options are for undergraduate students with outstanding academic records. Upon acceptance, well-qualified undergraduate students can begin graduate study before completing their BS degree, shortening the time it takes to earn both degrees. Students should consult an academic adviser for more information.

Applied mathematics, BS degree/Applied and computational mathematics, MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MATH-181
LAS Perspective 7A (mathematical): Project-based Calculus I
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals.
4
MATH-182
LAS Perspective 7B (mathematical): Project-based Calculus II
This is the second in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates.
4
MATH-199
Mathematics and Statistics Seminar
This course introduces the programs within the School of Mathematical Sciences, and provides an introduction to math and statistics software. The course provides practice in technical writing.
1
CSCI-101
Principles of Computing
This course is designed to introduce students to the central ideas of computing. Students will engage in activities that show how computing changes the world and impacts daily lives. Students will develop step-by-step written solutions to basic problems and implement their solutions using a programming language. Assignments will be completed both individually and in small teams. Students will be required to demonstrate oral and written communication skills through such assignments as short papers, homeworks, group discussions and debates, and development of a term paper.
3
CSCI-141
Computer Science I
This course serves as an introduction to computational thinking using a problem-centered approach. Specific topics covered include: expression of algorithms in pseudo code and a programming language; functional and imperative programming techniques; control structures; problem solving using recursion; basic searching and sorting; elementary data structures such as lists, trees, and graphs; and correctness, testing and debugging. Assignments (both in class and for homework) requiring a pseudo code solution and an implementation are an integral part of the course. An end-of-term project is also required.
4
ACSC-010
Year One
The Year One class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, personal success, leadership development, social responsibility and life academic skills awareness and application. Year One is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build relationships and help them become an integral part of the campus community.
0
 
First Year LAS Elective
3
 
First Year Writing 
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
LAS Perspective 5‡ (natural science inquiry)
4
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
MATH-200
Discrete Mathematics with Introduction to Proofs
This course prepares students for professions that use mathematics in daily practice, and for mathematics courses beyond the introductory level where it is essential to communicate effectively in the language of mathematics. It covers various methods of mathematical proof, starting with basic techniques in propositional and predicate calculus and set theory, and then moving to applications in advanced mathematics.
3
MATH-221
Multivariable and Vector Calculus
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes a study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, Stokes' Theorem, Green's Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-219.
4
MATH-251
Probability and Statistics I
This course introduces sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability and independence, distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions (discrete and continuous), the central limit theorem, descriptive statistics, interval estimation, and applications of probability and statistics to real-world problems. A statistical package such as Minitab or R is used for data analysis and statistical applications.
3
MATH-252
Probability and Statistics II
This course covers basic statistical concepts, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, point estimation, and simple linear regression. The statistical software package MINITAB will be used for data analysis and statistical applications.
3
MATH-231
Differential Equations
This course is an introduction to the study of ordinary differential equations and their applications. Topics include solutions to first order equations and linear second order equations, method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, linear independence and the Wronskian, vibrating systems, and Laplace transforms.
3
MATH-241
Linear Algebra
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of linear algebra, and techniques of matrix manipulation. Topics include linear transformations, Gaussian elimination, matrix arithmetic, determinants, vector spaces, linear independence, basis, null space, row space, and column space of a matrix, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, change of basis, similarity and diagonalization. Various applications are studied throughout the course.
3
MATH-399
Mathematical Science Job Search Seminar
This course helps students prepare to search for co-op or full-time employment. Students will learn strategies for conducting a successful job search and transitioning into the work world. The course meets one hour each week for five weeks.
0
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (natural science inquiry)
3
 
LAS Perspective 6‡ (scientific principles)
4
Third Year
MATH-431
Real Variables I
This course is an investigation and extension of the theoretical aspects of elementary calculus. Topics include mathematical induction, real numbers, sequences, functions, limits, and continuity. The workshop will focus on helping students develop skill in writing proofs.
3
 
Program Electives
18
 
LAS Immersion 1, 2
6
 
Open Elective
3
 
LAS Elective
3
Fourth Year
MATH-421
Mathematical Modeling (WI)
This course explores problem solving, formulation of the mathematical model from physical considerations, solution of the mathematical problem, testing the model and interpretation of results. Problems are selected from the physical sciences, engineering, and economics.
3
MATH-441
Abstract Algebra
This course covers basic set theory, number theory, groups, subgroups, cyclic and permutation groups, Lagrange and Sylow theorems, quotient groups, and isomorphism theorems. Group Theory finds applications in other scientific disciplines like physics and chemistry.
3
MATH-611
Numerical Analysis
3
MATH-606
Graduate Seminar I
The course prepares students to engage in activities necessary for independent mathematical research and introduces students to a broad range of active interdisciplinary programs related to applied mathematics.
1
MATH-607
Graduate Seminar II
This course is a continuation of Graduate Seminar I. It prepares students to engage in activities necessary for independent mathematical research and introduces them to a broad range of active interdisciplinary programs related to applied mathematics.
1
 
Math Graduate Core Electives
9
 
LAS Immersion 3
3
 
LAS Electives
6
 
Open Elective
3
Fifth Year
MATH-790
Thesis
Masters-level research by the candidate on an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the research advisor.
7
 
Graduate Core Elective
3
 
Graduate Concentration Courses
6
 
Graduate Electives
9
Total Semester Credit Hours
151

Please see General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

‡ Students will satisfy this requirement by taking either a 3 or 4 credit hour lab science course. If a science course consists of separate lecture and laboratory sections, students must take both the lecture and lab portions to satisfy the requirement.

Faculty

Michael Cromer - mec2sma

RIT Username
mec2sma
Email
mec2sma@rit.edu
Courses Taught This Semester
2191-MATH-495-01;2185-MATH-381-04;2185-MATH-495-02;2191-MATH-495-01;2191-MATH-381-01;2191-MATH-381-01;2185-MATH-790-01;2181-MATH-790-05;2181-MATH-495-03;2181-MATH-326-01;2181-MATH-495-01;2181-MATH-326-04;2181-MATH-326-01;2181-MATH-495-01;2181-MATH-326-04;2181-MATH-495-03;2181-MATH-790-05;2185-MATH-790-01;2185-MATH-495-02;2185-MATH-381-04;2185-MATH-500-02;2185-MATH-500-02;2185-MATH-495-12;2185-MATH-495-12;2185-MATH-495-09;2185-MATH-495-09;2185-MATH-495-11;2185-MATH-495-11;2185-MATH-495-10;2185-MATH-495-10;2185-MATH-495-08;2185-MATH-495-08;2191-MATH-831-01;2191-MATH-831-01;
Additional colleges/divisions
Scholarly Publications
Journal Paper
Cromer, Michael, Glenn H. Fredrickson, and L. Gary Leal. "Concentration Fluctuations in Polymer Solutions Under Mixed Flow." Journal of Rheology 6. 14 (2017): 711-730. Print.
Kalb, Arthur, et al. "Role of Chain Scission in Cross-Slot Flow of Wormlike Micellar Solutions." Physical Review Fluids 2. (2017): 1-10. Print.
Cromer, M. and L. P. Cook. "A Study of Pressure-Driven Flow of Wormlike Micellar Solutions through a Converging/Diverging Channel." Journal of Rheology 60. (2016): 953-972. Web.
Peterson, J. D., et al. "Shear Banding Predictions for the Two-Fluid Rolie-Poly Model." Journal of Rheology 60. (2016): 927-951. Web.
First Name
Michael
Middle Name
E
Last Name
Cromer
Phone
585-475-4078
College/Division & Department
Additional departments
Job Title
Instructional Faculty
Professional Roles
College of Science:Instructional Faculty

Kara Maki - klmsma

RIT Username
klmsma
Email
klmsma@rit.edu
Courses Taught This Semester
2185-MATH-500-01;2181-MATH-790-08;2181-MATH-622-01;2181-MATH-219-10;2181-MATH-381-03;2181-MATH-622-01;2181-MATH-219-10;2185-MATH-500-01;2181-MATH-790-08;2181-MATH-381-03;
Scholarly Publications
Invited Paper
Maki, Kara L. and David S. Ross. "A New Model for the Suction Pressure Under A Contact Lens." Journal of Biological Systems. (2014). Print.
Journal Paper
Li, Longfei, et al. "Tear Film Dynamics with Evaporation, Wetting, and Time-dependent Flux Boundary Condition on an Eye-shaped Domain." Physics of Fluids 26. 5 (2014): 52101. Print.
Maki, Kara L. and David S. Ross. "Exchange of Tears under a Contact Lens Is Driven by Distortions of the Contact Lens." Integrative and Comparative Biology 54. 6 (2014): 1043-1050. Print.
Lee, S. H., et al. "Gravity-driven Instability of a Thin Liquid Film Underneath a Soft Solid." Physical Review E 90. 5 (2014): 53009. Print.
Huang, J., et al. "Phantom Study of Tear Film Dynamics with Optical Coherence Tomography and Maximum-likelihood Estimation." Optics Letters 38. (2013): 1721-1723. Print.
Huang, J., et al. "Maximum-likelihood Estimation in Optical Coherence Tomography in the Context of the Tear." Biomedical Optics Express 4. (2013): 1806-1816. Print.
Maki, Kara L. and Yuriko Renardy. "The Dynamics of a Viscoelastic Liquid which Displays Thixotropic Yield Stress Behavior." Journal of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics 181. (2012): 30-50. Print.
Maki, Kara L. and Satish Kumar. "Fast Evaporation of Spreading Droplets of Colloidal Suspensions." Langmuir 27. (2011): 11347-11363. Print.
Invited Keynote/Presentation
Maki, Kara L. "Mechanics of the Contact Lens." Indo-American Frontiers of Science Symposium. Indo-US Science & Technology Forum and National Academy of Sciences. Agra, India. 7 Apr. 2013. Conference Presentation.
Maki, Kara L. "Fast Evaporation of Spreading Droplets of Colloidal Suspensions." 1st Int. Workshop on Wetting and Evaporation: Droplets of Pure and Complex Fluids. Aix Marseille Universite. Marseilles, France. 18 Jun. 2013. Lecture.
Maki, Kara Lee and David S. Ross. "Settling Dynamics of the Contact Lens." Applied and Computational Math Seminar. George Mason University. Fairfax, VA. 26 Oct. 2012. Lecture.
Maki, Kara Lee and David Ross. "Settling Dynamics of the Contact Lens." Workshop on Thin Liquid Films and Fluid Interfaces: Models, Experiments and Applications. Banff International Research Station. Banff, Alberta, Canada. 13 Dec. 2012. Conference Presentation.
Maki, Kara Lee and Yuriko Rendary. "Dynamics of a Thixotropic Yield Stress Fluid: A Mathematical Perspective of Ketchup?" Applied Mathematics Seminar. University of Delaware. Newark, DE. 27 Jun. 2012. Lecture.
Maki, Kara Lee and David Ross. "Settling Dynamics of a Contact Lens." Minisymposium on Dynamics and Applications of Thin Liquid Flims. Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics Annual Meeting. Minneapolis, MN. 12 Jul. 2012. Conference Presentation.
Maki, Kara Lee and Satish Kumar. "Fast Evaporation of Spreading Droplets of Colloidal Suspensions." Workshop on Surfactant Driven Thin Film Flows. Fields Institute for Research in Mathematical Sciences. Toronto, Ontario. 22 Feb. 2012. Conference Presentation.
Maki, Kara Lee and Satish Kumar. "Fast Evaporation of Spreading Droplets of Colloidal Suspensions." Special Session on Mathematics in Industry. Joint Mathematic Meeting. Boston, MA. 4 Jan. 2012. Conference Presentation.
Maki, Kara L. "Skin Formation in Drying Droplets of Colloidal Suspensions." NSF Mathematics Institutes' Modern Math Workshop. The Society for Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science Annual Conference. San Jose Convention Center, San Jose, CA. 26 Oct. 2011. Conference Presentation.
First Name
Kara
Middle Name
Lee
Last Name
Maki
Phone
585-475-2541
College/Division & Department
Job Title
Instructional Faculty
Professional Roles
College of Science:Instructional Faculty

David Ross - dsrsma

RIT Username
dsrsma
Email
dsrsma@rit.edu
Courses Taught This Semester
2185-MATH-722-01;2191-MATH-241-04;2191-MATH-241-04;2185-MATH-790-04;2181-MATH-431-01;2181-MATH-251-15;2181-MATH-790-06;2181-MATH-431-01;2181-MATH-251-15;2181-MATH-790-06;2185-MATH-790-04;2185-MATH-722-01;2191-MATH-622-01;2191-MATH-622-01;
Scholarly Publications
Journal Paper
Ross, David S., Khamir Mehta, and Antonio Cabal. "Mathematical Model of Bone Remodeling Captures the Antiresorptive and Anabolic Actions of Various Therapies." Bulletin of Mathematical Biology 79. 1 (2017): 117-142. Print.
Wahle, C.W., et al. "Model for Screened, Charge-Regulated Electrostatics of an Eye Lens Protein: Bovine GammaB-Crystallin." Physical Review E 96. 3 (2017): 1-25. Print.
Bell, Michael M., et al. "Statistical-Thermodynamic Model for Light Scattering from Eye Lens Protein Mixtures." Journal of Chemical Physics 146. (2017): 1-32. Print.
Ross, David S., Kara L. Maki, and Emily K. Holtz. "Existence Theory for the Radically Symmetric Contact Lens Equation." SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics 76. 3 (2016): 827-844. Print.
Caniga, Michael, et al. "Preclinical Experimental and Mathematical Approaches for Assessing Effective Doses of Inhaled Drugs, Using Mometasone to Support Human Dose Predictions." Journal of Aerosol Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Delivery 29. 4 (2016): 362—377. Print.
Wahle, Chris, David S. Ross, and George Thurston. "Methods for Light Scattering Free Energy Determination for Restricted Composition Domains in Ternary Liquid Mixtures." Journal of Chemical Physics 139. (2013): 124114. Print.
Huang, Jinxin, et al. "Maximum-likelihood Estimation in Optical Coherence Tomography in the Context of the Tear Film Dynamics." Biomedical Optics Express 4. 10 (2013): 1806-1816. Print.
Brooks, B. P., N. DiFonzo, and D. S. Ross. "The GBN-Dialogue Model of Outgroup-Negative Rumor Transmission: Group Membership, Belief, and Novelty." Nonlinear Dynamics, Psychology, and Life Sciences 17. 2 (2013): 269-293. Print.
Huang, J., et al. "Quantitative Measurement of Tear Film Dynamics with Optical Coherence Tomography and a Maximum-Likelihood Estimator." Optics Letters 38. 10 (2013): 1721-1723. Print.
Cabal, A., et al. "A Semi-Mechanistic Model of the Time-Course of Release of PTH into Plasma Following Administration of the Calcilytic JTT-305/MK-5442 in Humans." Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 28. 8 (2013): 1830-1836. Print.
DiFonzo, N., et al. "Rumor Clustering, Consensus, and Polarization: Dynamic Social Impact and Self-Organization of Hearsay." Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 49. 3 (2013): 378-399. Print.
Golen, E., et al. "An Underwater Sensor Allocation Scheme for Non-Circular Sensing Coverage Regions." ISRN Sensor Networks 2013. (2013): 963029. Web.
Ross, David S., et al. "Dynamics of Cell Signaling and PTH Treatments for Ostoporosis." Discrete and Continuous Dynamical Systems, Series B 17. 6 (2012): 2185-2200. Print.
Wahle, Chris, David S. Ross, and George Thurston. "On the Design of Experiments for Determining Ternary Mixture Free Energies from Static Light Scattering Data using a Nonlinear Partial Differential Equation." Journal of Chemical Physics 137. (2012): 34201. Print.
Wahle, Chris, David S. Ross, and George Thurston. "On Inferring Liquid-Liquid Phase Boundaries and Tie Lines from Ternary Mixture Light Scattering." Journal of Chemical Physics 137. (2012): 34203. Print.
Wahle, Chris, David S. Ross, and George Thurston. "Mathematical and Computational Aspects of Quaternary Liquid Mixing Free Energy Measurement Using Light Scattering." Journal of Chemical Physics 137. (2012): 34202. Print.
Agyingi, E., D. S. Ross, and K. Bathena. "Transmission Dynamics of Leismaniasis." Journal of Biological Systems 19. 2 (2011): 237-251. Print.
Published Conference Proceedings
Agyingi, E., D. S. Ross, and S. Maggelakis. "Modeling the Effect of Topical Oxygen Therapy on Wound Healing." Proceedings of the Advances in Mathematical and Computational Methods. Ed. I. Kotsireas, R. Melnik, and B. West. Melville, NY: American Institute of Physics, 2011. Print.
Published Article
Agyingi, Ephraim, S. Maggelakis, and D.S. Ross. “The Effect of Bacteria on Epidermal Wound Healing.” Mathematical Modeling of NaturalPhenomena, 5.3 (2010): 28-39. Print. *
Hollenbeck, Dawn., K. Martini, A. Langner, A. Harkin, D. Ross,G. Thurston. “Model for Evaluating the Patterned Charge Regulation Contributionto Electrostatic Interactions between LowDielectric Spheres”. Physical Review E, 82(2010): 0314021-03140213. Print. ≠ *
Ross, David. “The Inverse Trochoid Problem.” Journal of theFranklin Institute, 347 (2010): 1281-1308. Print. «
Lutzer, Carl., and D. Ross. “The Dynamics of Embedded-Charge Microenergy Harvesting.” Journal of Computational and Nonlinear Dynamics,5.2 (2010): 0210041-0210049. Print. ≠ «
First Name
David
Middle Name
S
Last Name
Ross
Phone
585-475-5275
Rank
College/Division & Department
Job Title
Instructional Faculty
Professional Roles
College of Science:Instructional Faculty

Carl Lutzer - cvlsma

RIT Username
cvlsma
Email
cvlsma@rit.edu
Courses Taught This Semester
2181-MATH-219-07;2185-MATH-241-01;2181-MATH-219-07;2185-MATH-241-01;2188-MATH-241-02;2188-MATH-241-02;
Additional colleges/divisions
First Name
Carl
Last Name
Lutzer
Phone
585-475-5133
Programs Taught Under
Rank
Department
College/Division & Department
Job Title
Interim Honors Director
Professional Roles
College of Science:Professor
Academic Affairs:Interim Honors Director

Akhtar Khan - aaksma

RIT Username
aaksma
Email
aaksma@rit.edu
Courses Taught This Semester
2191-MATH-625-01;2185-MATH-412-01;2181-MATH-181-03;2181-MATH-790-13;2181-MATH-181-05;2181-MATH-181-03;2181-MATH-790-13;2181-MATH-181-05;2185-MATH-412-01;2185-MATH-495-17;2185-MATH-495-17;2191-MATH-625-01;
Additional colleges/divisions
Scholarly Publications
Journal Paper
Khan, Akhtar A. and Dumitru Motreanu. "Existence Theorems for Elliptic and Evolutionary." J Optim Theory Appl 167. (2015): 1136—1161. Print.
Jadamba, B., et al. "Identification of Flexural Rigidity in a Kirchhoff Plates Model." Mathematical Problems in Engineering ID 290301. (2015): 1--11. Print.
Khan, Akhtar A., Christiane Tammer, and Constantin Zalinescu. "Regularization of quasi-variational inequalities." Optimization 64. (2015): 1703--1724. Print.
Bush, Nathan, et al. "Identification Of A Parameter in Fourth-Order Partial Differential Equations By An Equation Error Approach." Mathematica Slovaca 65. (2015): 1--13. Print.
Khan, Akhtar A. and Doug Ward. "Toward Second-Order Sensitivity Analysis in Set-Valued Optimization." Journal of Nonlinear and Convex Analysis 13. (2012): 65-83. Print.
Khan, Akhtar A. and M. Sama. "A Multiplier Rule for Stable Problems in Vector Optimization." Journal of Convex Analysis 19. (2012): 525-539. Print.
Khan, Akhtar A. and M. Sama. "Optimal Control of Multivalued Quasi Variational Inequalities." Nonlinear Analysis 75. (2012): 1419-1428. Print.
Khan, Akhtar A., B. Jadamba, and M. Sama. "Regularization for State Constrained Optimal Control Problems by Half Spaces Based Decoupling." Systems Control Letters 61. (2012): 707-713. Print.
Khan, Akhtar A. and D. Motreanu. "Local Minimizers Versus X-Local Minimizers." Optimization Letters 10.1007/s11590-012-0474-8. (2012): 1-7. Web.
Khan, Akhtar A. and C. Tammer. "Second-Order Optimality Conditions in Set-valued Optimization via Asymptotic Derivatives." Optimization 10.1080/02331934.2012.674948. (2012): 1-16. Web.
Khan, Akhtar A., et al. "Proximal Point Methods for the Inverse Problem of Identifying Parameters in Beam Models." Emerging Applications of Wavelet Methods 1463. (2012): 16-38. Print.
Khan, Akhtar A. and C. Tammer. "Generalized Dubovitskii-Milyutin Approach." Vietnam Journal of Mathematics 40. (2012): 285-304. Print.
Khan, Akhtar A., Baasansuren Jadamba, and Miguel Sama. "Generalized Solutions of Quasi Variational Inequalities." Optimization Letters doi:10.1007/s11590-011-0363-6. (2011): 1-11. Print.
Book Chapter
Khan, Akhtar A., Elisabeth Koebis, and Christiane Tammer. "Scalarization Methods in Multiobjective Optimization, Robustness, Risk Theory and Finance." Multiple Criteria Decision Making in Finance. Ed. M. Al-Shammari. Berlin, Germany: Springer, 2015. 135-157. Print.
Gockenbach, M., et al. "Proximal Methods for the Elastography Inverse Problem of Tumor Identification Using an Equation Error Approach." Advances in Variational and Hemivariational Inequalities. Berlin, Germany: Springer, 2015. 169--192. Print.
Khan, Akhtar A., Baasansuren Jadamba, and Miguel Sama. "Inverse Problems on Parameter Identification in Partial Differential Equations." Mathematical Methods, Models and Algorithms in Science and Technology. Singapore: World Scientific, 2011. 228- 258. Print.
Invited Keynote/Presentation
Khan, Akhtar A. "An Optimization Framework for the Elasticity." Variational Analysis And Applications. International Centre for Scientific Culture "E. Majorana" School of Mathematics "G. Stampacchia". Erice, Italy. 28 Aug. 2015. Conference Presentation.
Khan, Akhtar A. "Stability of the Elasticity Imaging Inverse Problem." Applied Inverse Problems. Inverse Problems Society. Helsinki, Finland. 25 May 2015. Conference Presentation.
Khan, Akhtar A. "Computational Methods for Elastography Inverse Problem,." High Performance Computing in Science and Engineering. University of Ostrava. Ostrava, zech Republic. 25 May 2015. Conference Presentation.
Khan, Akhtar A. "On Evolutionary and Elliptic Quasi Variational Inequalities." The 22nd International Symposium on Mathematical Programming,. Carnegie Mellon University and University of Pittsburgh. Pittsburgh,, USA. 12 Jul. 2015. Conference Presentation.
Khan, Akhtar A. "Some Aspects of Elastography Inverse Problem." The Modeling and Optimization: Theory and Applications (MOPTA). Lehigh University. Bethlehem, PA. 20 Jul. 2015. Conference Presentation.
Khan, Akhtar A. "Parameter Identification in Variational Problems,." Recent Developments in Applied Mathematics. Palacky University Olomouc. Palacky, Czech Republic. 2 Feb. 2015. Conference Presentation.
Khan, Akhtar A. "Heavy Ball with Friction Methods for Inverse Problems." Joint Mathematics Meetings. SIAM/MAA. San Antonio, USA. 10 Jan. 2015. Conference Presentation.
Khan, Akhtar A. "A Convex Optimization Problem in Identifying Tumor Location." The 21st International Symposium on Mathematical Programming. N/A. Berlin, Germany. 19 Aug. 2012. Lecture.
Khan, Akhtar A. "Ill Posed Quasi-Variational Inequalities with Multi-valued Maps." The 6th International Conference on Inverse Problems: Modeling and Simulation. IP. Antalya, Turkey. 21 May 2012. Lecture.
Khan, Akhtar A. "Inverse Problems in Linear Elasticity: Compressible and Incompressible Cases." The fourth International Workshop on Variational Analysis and Applications. Stampacchia School of Mathematics, Erice. Sicily, Italy. 14 May 2012. Lecture.
Khan, Akhtar A. "Conical Regularization for Optimal Control Problems." Invited Talk. University of Catania. Catania, Italy. 3 Mar. 2012. Lecture.
Khan, Akhtar A. "Conical Regularization for Abstract Constrained Optimization Problems in Hilbert Spaces." Joint Mathematics Meetings. AMS/SIAM. Boston, MA. 4 Jan. 2012. Lecture.
Khan, Akhtar A. "Conical Derivatives for Optimization Problems." Applied Inverse Problems. University of Texas at A&M. University of Texas at A&M, College Station, TX. 24 May 2011. Conference Presentation.
Khan, Akhtar A. "Toward Second-Order Sensitivity Analysis in Set-Valued Optimization." Joint Mathematics Meetings. AMS/MAA. Sheraton, New Orleans, LA. 8 Jan. 2011. Conference Presentation.
Khan, Akhtar A. "Inverse Problem for Quasi Variational Inequalities." 7th International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics. ICIAM. Vancouver Convention Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. 18 Jun. 2011. Conference Presentation.
Journal Editor
Grecksch, Wilfried, et al, ed. JOTA. New York: Springer, 2015. Print.
Published Article
Khan, Akhtar, B. Jadamba, M.S. Gockenbach. “A Comparative Numerical Study ofOptimization Approaches for ellipticInverse Problems.” JMI International Journal of Mathematical Sciences,1 (2010): 1-20. Print. *
Khan, Akhtar, B.Jadamba, B.D. Rouhani, F. Raciti.“Generalized solutions of multi-valuedmonotone quasi variational inequalities.” Optimization and Optimal Control: Theoryand Applications, 2010. 227-240. Print. *
Formal Presentation
Khan, Akhtar. “Inverse Problems for Variational Equationsand Quasi-variational Inequalities.” International Congress of Mathematicians2010. Hyderabad, India. August 2010.Presentation.
Khan, Akhtar.”Ill-posed Quasi-Variational Inequalities.” International Conference on Mathematicsand Applications. New Delhi, India. 15-17Aug. 2010. Presentation.
Khan, Akhtar. “Stability Analysis of the Modified Output Least Squares for the Elliptic Inverse Problems.” Satellite Conference onInverse Problems. New Delhi, India.14 Aug. 2010. Presentation.
Khan, Akhtar. “Numerical Methods for Elliptic Inverse Problems.” International Conference on Optimization, Simulation and Control. Ulannbaatar, Mongolia. 25-28 July 2010.Presentation.
First Name
Akhtar
Middle Name
A
Last Name
Khan
Phone
585-475-6367
Rank
College/Division & Department
Additional departments
Job Title
Instructional Faculty
Professional Roles
College of Science:Instructional Faculty

Admission Requirements

Freshman Admission

For all bachelor’s degree programs, a strong performance in a college preparatory program is expected. Generally, this includes 4 years of English, 3-4 years of mathematics, 2-3 years of science, and 3 years of social studies and/or history.

Specific math and science requirements and other recommendations

  • 3 years of math required; pre-calculus recommended

Transfer Admission

Transfer course recommendations without associate degree

Courses in liberal arts, physics, math, and chemistry

Appropriate associate degree programs for transfer

AS degree in liberal arts with math/science option

Learn about admissions and financial aid 

Additional Info

Accelerated 4+1 MBA option

An accelerated 4+1 option is available for students who wish to earn a BS in applied mathematics and an MBA. The option is offered in conjunction with Saunders College of Business and allows students to obtain both degrees in five years of study.