Biomedical Engineering Bachelor of Science Degree

A biomedical engineering BS combines engineering with biology and medicine to create innovative solutions that improve human health.


97%

Outcome Rate of RIT Graduates from this degree


Overview for Biomedical Engineering BS

Why Study RIT’s Bachelor’s Degree in Biomedical Engineering

  • Comprehensive Curriculum: A calculus-based engineering degree with foundational science that includes cell and molecular biology, human physiology, physics, and chemistry.
  • Gain Real-World Experience: Four blocks cooperative education offer opportunities to gain real-world experience through engineering co-ops.
  • Jobs at Industry-Leading Companies: Companies hiring our students for co-ops include Medtronic, Merck, Moderna, Bausch & Lomb, Bristol Myers Squibb, Corning, Hill-Rom, Johnson & Johnson, Ortho Clinical Diagnostics, Regeneron, and more.

Improving the health and well-being of others is the emphasis of this dynamic biomedical engineering BS. Biomedical engineering leverages the vast knowledge base of engineering, biology, and medicine to solve problems focused on health care and the human body. Biomedical engineers:

  • Design instruments, devices, and software
  • Bring together knowledge from many technical sources to develop new medical products, procedures, and pharmaceuticals
  • Conduct research needed to solve clinical problems

Biomedical Engineering Courses

RIT’s biomedical engineering BS is a five-year program consisting of the following:

  • Biomedical Engineering Core Courses: A core set of courses in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) give you the ability to apply principles of science and engineering to analyze, model, design, and realize biomedical devices, systems, components, and processes. You will learn to solve biomedical engineering problems including those associated with the interaction between living and non-living systems as well as make measurements on, and interpret data from, living systems.
  • Professional Technical Electives: Two free electives allow you to choose courses from any college in the university. In the fourth or fifth year of the program, students choose two technical electives specifically related to some aspect of biomedical engineering, such as biomechanics, instrumentation and imaging, or tissue engineering. 
  • Cooperative Education: One year of cooperative education experience provides you with hands-on experience working in industry. (See Cooperative Education below.)
  • Liberal Arts Courses: Courses that include writing, communications, and the humanities and social sciences comprise liberal arts courses you will complete as part of your degree. A three-course immersion is also required. The immersion can enhance your biomedical engineering studies or be a topic that explores a personal interest.
  • Free Electives: Chosen based on your interests, these free electives provide you with the opportunity to select additional course work to enhance a personal or professional interest.
  • Multidisciplinary Senior Design: This two-course multidisciplinary senior design experience integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment that bridges engineering disciplines. Explore projects and innovations developed in multidisciplinary senior design.

Learn more about the Student Learning Outcomes and Program Educational Objectives for the biomedical engineering BS degree.

What’s the Difference Between Engineering and Engineering Technology?

It’s a question we’re asked all the time. While there are subtle differences in the course work between the two, choosing a major in engineering or engineering technology is more about identifying what you like to do and how you like to do it.

Furthering Your Education in Biomedical Engineering

Students enrolled in the biomedical engineering undergraduate program may choose to participate in one of our pre-med or pre-vet advising programs:

RIT’s Combined Accelerated Bachelor’s/Master’s Degrees enable you to earn both a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in as little as five years, giving you a competitive advantage.  

  • Biomedical Engineering BS/Science, Technology and Public Policy MS: Throughout history, technology has been a major driver of social, political, and economic change. Societies around the globe employ public policies to solve problems and achieve their social, economic, and environmental objectives. The spheres of public policy and technology overlap as society is challenged to consider not only the role of new technologies in its quest for improved quality of life, but also how policies affect the development, emergence, and choice of new technologies. Because of the role engineers play in creating new technology, they increasingly have an important role in helping to shape public policy. Moreover, policies affecting how we as a society live and work—such as environmental, industrial, energy, and national security policy, to name a few—demand that engineers be prepared to integrate policy issues into their engineering practice. Biomedical engineering students may choose to pursue an accelerated dual degree in which they may complete the BS in biomedical engineering and an MS in science, technology and public policy in approximately five years. Many biomedical engineers combine their technical knowledge with the policy skills needed to analyze and advocate for policy change in both private and public organizations. The interdisciplinary nature of the program, in conjunction with the quantitative and qualitative approaches taken to understand and analyze policy, will contribute to your ability to gain exciting leadership roles in a range of the engineering fields.
  • +1 MBA: Students who enroll in a qualifying undergraduate degree have the opportunity to add an MBA to their bachelor’s degree after their first year of study, depending on their program. Learn how the +1 MBA can accelerate your learning and position you for success.

 

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Careers and Cooperative Education

Typical Job Titles

Biomedical Engineer Bioprocess Engineer
Bioprint Engineer Regulatory Affairs Engineer
Computational Biologist Production Engineer
Quality Engineer Project Engineer
Systems Engineer

Industries

  • Research
  • Biotech and Life Sciences
  • Medical Devices
  • Pharmaceuticals
  • Health Care

Cooperative Education

What’s different about an RIT education? It’s the career experience you gain by completing cooperative education and internships with top companies in every single industry. You’ll earn more than a degree. You’ll gain real-world career experience that sets you apart. It’s exposure–early and often–to a variety of professional work environments, career paths, and industries.

Co-ops and internships take your knowledge and turn it into know-how. Your engineering co-ops will provide hands-on experience that enables you to apply your engineering knowledge in professional settings while you make valuable connections between classwork and real-world applications.

The biomedical engineering degree requires students to complete four blocks (roughly 48 weeks) of cooperative education.

Featured Work

Featured Profiles

Curriculum for 2023-2024 for Biomedical Engineering BS

Current Students: See Curriculum Requirements

Biomedical Engineering, BS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
BIME-181
Intro to Biomedical Engineering
This course will provide an overview of the discipline. It will consist of the following components: 1) Overview of the discipline. 2) Introduction of an engineering design methodology applicable to biomedical problems. 3) Opportunity to address a simple biomedical engineering-related problem that requires formulating a problem statement, conducting research, proposing a solution, preparing a summary report, and presenting results. 4) Introduction to team dynamics, organization and interpersonal communication associated with working with a multidisciplinary team. (This course is restricted to BIME-BS Major students.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
1
BIME-191
Introduction to Programming for Biomedical Engineers
This course introduces basic computational problem solving techniques used in engineering. Topics include: 1) Use of common engineering tools (Excel, Matlab) to analyze data, 2) Development of algorithms and flowcharts to solve engineering problems, 3) Application of basic programming concepts (input/output methods, variable types, repetition structures, decision structures, and subprograms) to create user-friendly computer programs (VBA, Matlab) that perform complex engineering calculations. (Prerequisites: BIME-181 or EGEN-100 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 4 (Spring).
3
CHMG-141
General & Analytical Chemistry I (General Education)
This is a general chemistry course for students in the life and physical sciences. College chemistry is presented as a science based on empirical evidence that is placed into the context of conceptual, visual, and mathematical models. Students will learn the concepts, symbolism, and fundamental tools of chemistry necessary to carry on a discourse in the language of chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between atomic structure, chemical bonds, and the transformation of these bonds through chemical reactions. The fundamentals of organic chemistry are introduced throughout the course to emphasize the connection between chemistry and the other sciences. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
CHMG-142
General & Analytical Chemistry II (General Education)
The course covers the thermodynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions. The relationship between energy and entropy change as the driving force of chemical processes is emphasized through the study of aqueous solutions. Specifically, the course takes a quantitative look at: 1) solubility equilibrium, 2) acid-base equilibrium, 3) oxidation-reduction reactions and 4) chemical kinetics. (Prerequisites: CHMG-141 or CHMG-131 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
CHMG-145
General & Analytical Chemistry I Lab (General Education )
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-141 lecture material. The course emphasizes laboratory techniques and data analysis skills. Topics include: gravimetric, volumetric, thermal, titration and spectrophotometric analyses, and the use of these techniques to analyze chemical reactions. (Corequisite: CHMG-141 or CHMG-131 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
1
CHMG-146
General & Analytical Chemistry II Lab (General Education )
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-142 lecture material. The course emphasizes the use of experiments as a tool for chemical analysis and the reporting of results in formal lab reports. Topics include the quantitative analysis of a multicomponent mixture using complexation and double endpoint titration, pH measurement, buffers and pH indicators, the kinetic study of a redox reaction, and the electrochemical analysis of oxidation reduction reactions. (Prerequisites: CHMG-131 or CHMG-141 or equivalent course. Corequisites: CHMG-142 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
1
MATH-181
Calculus I (General Education – Mathematical Perspective A)
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals. (Prerequisites: MATH-111 or (NMTH-220 and NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275) or equivalent courses with a minimum grade of B-, or a score of at least 60% on the RIT Mathematics Placement Exam. Co-requisites: MATH-181R or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
MATH-182
Calculus II (General Education – Mathematical Perspective B)
This is the second in a two-course sequence. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or MATH-181A or equivalent course. Co-requisites: MATH-182R or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
PHYS-211
University Physics I (General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective)
This is a course in calculus-based physics for science and engineering majors. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton's Laws, gravitation, work and energy, momentum and impulse, conservation laws, systems of particles, rotational motion, static equilibrium, mechanical oscillations and waves, and data presentation/analysis. The course is taught in a workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: MATH-182 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
YOPS-10
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. (This class is restricted to incoming 1st year or global campus students.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education – First Year Writing (WI)
3
 
General Education – Elective
3
Second Year
BIME-99
BME Career Seminar
The “BME Careers” seminar series helps students learn more about the field through the experiences of other students, faculty, alumni, and working engineers. The series provides resources that will help them succeed at RIT and in the work force. Questions such as “What can I do as a BME?” and “How does your company use BMEs?” are complicated. Rather than explore these questions in a single session, we’re using this seminar series to help students explore these questions over the course of the year. (Prerequisites: EGEN-99 or equivalent course.) Lecture 1 (Spring).
0
BIME-200
Introductory Musculoskeletal Biomechanics
This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics in the context of biomechanics. The course is designed to provide students with an understanding of how the musculoskeletal system reacts to various mechanical forces applied to it in both static and dynamic conditions. Sporting examples are used to illustrate how classical Newtonian mechanics is applied in human locomotion externally, in interactions with the environment. The course describes how basics of kinetics and kinematics are used to analyze the mechanics of human movement and inanimate objects. The main areas addressed are static equilibrium, mechanical stability, linear and angular kinematics, motion with constant and non-constant acceleration, collision and conservation of momentum, work, energy, and power. The course develops an awareness and appreciation of both qualitative and quantitative data collection methods within the field of biomechanics. In addition to rigid body mechanics, the course also introduces students to the concepts of stress and strain and how they affect muscle tissue and bones. Mechanical properties such as stiffness, strength, toughness, and fatigue resistance are considered in the context of bone structures and loading. (Prerequisites: PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or 1017-312 or 1017-312T or 1017-389 or PHYS-206 and PHYS-207 or equivalent course and student standing in the BIME-BS or ENGRX-UND program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
BIME-250
Biosystems Process Analysis
A first course for biomedical engineers introducing units, physical properties, dimensions, dimensional analysis, data analysis and data presentation for engineering, stoichiometry of biological reactions, simple material and energy balances for batch and continuous systems in steady and unsteady states. This course provides the students with the essential skills required to analyze biosystems, and special focus is given to developing problem solving skills with a biological context. (Prerequisite: MATH-182 and CHMG-142 or equivalent course or student standing in the BIME-BS or ENGRX-UND program. Co-requisite: BIOG-140 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
BIME-320
Fluid Mechanics
This course exposes students to the fundamentals of static and flowing fluids at both large-scale (control volumes) and local differential scales. Student learn how to examine forces on solids due to static and flowing fluids, estimate head losses and pumping requirements in piping systems. The art of engineering approximation is examined through estimates of forces due to flow on solids, as well as limiting cases involving internal pipe flows with friction factors. Exact solutions of local differential equations of fluid mechanics are considered under both steady state and transient conditions, and these analyses are used to determine forces in control volume analysis of bodies. The important interplay between differential and control volume analyses in solving problems is emphasized. Lastly, students are taught to make analogies about the concepts learned in generic fluid mechanics and apply them to the circulatory system, while outlining appropriate limitations. (Prerequisites: (PHYS-206 or PHYS-211) and (MATH-221 or MATH-231) or equivalent courses. Co-requisite: MATH-221 or MATH-231 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
BIME-370
Introduction to Biomaterials Science
This course is intended to provide an overview of materials used in biomedical applications, both internal and external to the human body. The specific objective of this course is to present the principles which apply to the properties and selection of materials used in medical applications. Topics include an introduction to deformable mechanics and viscoelasticity; structure and properties of metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites; fundamental composition of biological tissues; and principles associated with the interaction between biological tissues and artificial materials. (Prerequisites: BIME-200 and CHMG-142 or equivalent courses. Co-requisite: BIOG-141 or BIOG-240 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
BIME-391
Biomechanics and Biomaterials Lab
Laboratory experiments are conducted to explore and reinforce fundamental principles and concepts introduced in BIME-200 (Introduction to Musculoskeletal Biomechanics) and BIME-370 (Introduction to Biomaterial Science). The experimental procedures involve measuring results, analyzing and interpreting data and drawing objective conclusions. Emphasis is also placed on proper documentation and effective presentation of findings and results. Lab procedures involve manipulation and measurements of anatomical structures and samples as well as equipment and materials designed to simulate naturally occurring tissues and structures. (Prerequisite: BIME-200 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: BIME-370 and (BIME-182 or BIME-191) or equivalent courses.) Lab 3, Lecture 1 (Spring).
2
BIOG-140
Cell and Molecular Biology for Engineers I (General Education)
This is the first course of a two-course sequence designed to introduce biomedical engineering students to the molecular and cellular basis of life with a particular emphasis on the integration of molecular systems that underscore human physiology. This course will start with the basic chemistry of biological macromolecules and then explore the cell starting from the nucleus and moving outward. Major topics will include: DNA replication; molecular basis of inheritance; the biology of RNA; gene expression; protein synthesis; the secretory pathways; and enzyme kinetics. Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall).
3
BIOG-240
Cell and Molecular Biology for Engineers II (General Education)
This is the second of a two-course sequence designed to introduce biomedical engineering students to the molecular and cellular basis of life with a particular emphasis on the integration of molecular systems in human physiology. This course will continue exploring sub-cellular systems by touring the function of each cellular organelle and describing the pathologic consequences that result from interruption of its normal function. Major topics will include: cellular energy production; the cytoskeleton; the lysosome; the plasma membrane; vesicle transport; cell-cell communication; signaling pathways; the cell cycle; and cell division. (Prerequisites: BIOG-140 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Spring).
3
EGEN-099
Engineering Co-op Preparation
This course will prepare students, who are entering their second year of study, for both the job search and employment in the field of engineering. Students will learn strategies for conducting a successful job search, including the preparation of resumes and cover letters; behavioral interviewing techniques and effective use of social media in the application process. Professional and ethical responsibilities during the job search and for co-op and subsequent professional experiences will be discussed. (This course is restricted to students in Kate Gleason College of Engineering with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
MATH-221
Multivariable and Vector Calculus (General Education)
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes a study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, Stokes' Theorem, Green's Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-219. (Prerequisite: C- or better MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
4
MATH-231
Differential Equations (General Education)
This course is an introduction to the study of ordinary differential equations and their applications. Topics include solutions to first order equations and linear second order equations, method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, linear independence and the Wronskian, vibrating systems, and Laplace transforms. (Prerequisite: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
PHYS-212
University Physics II (General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective)
This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: (PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or PHYS-216) or (MECE-102, MECE-103 and MECE-205) and (MATH-182 or MATH-172 or MATH-182A) or equivalent courses. Grades of C- or better are required in all prerequisite courses.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
Third Year
BIME-360
Biomedical Signal Analysis
Introduction to and application of signal processing techniques to evaluate and manipulate continuous time signals presumed to originate from systems that are linear, time invariant, and continuous time in nature. (Prerequisites: (BIME-182 or BIME-191) and MATH-231 or equivalent courses. Co-requisites: BIME-410 and (STAT-251 or MATH-251) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
BIME-407
Medical Device Design
This course is an introduction to the biodesign process used for innovating medical technologies. Student teams will apply a needs-based assessment strategy to identify opportunities in a biomedical related field such as assistive technologies and rehabilitation engineering. Incorporating CAD will culminate in a virtual medical device prototype. Concepts of intellectual property, regulatory considerations, and reimbursement and business models will be introduced. (Prerequisite: BIME-499 or MECE-499 or ISEE-499 or CHME-499 or EEEE-499 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
BIME-410
Systems Physiology I
This course is concerned with the fundamental aspects of those human physiological systems that sense and interact with our environment. In particular, the nervous system and the musculoskeletal system. This course will cover the physiology of electrically excitable cells and tissues with a focus on the electrical signals propagated by neurons in the nervous system. It will discuss the special senses with a focus on the sense of touch, hearing, and vision. It will also introduce the differences and relationships between speed, specificity, and sensitivity of signaling mechanism of the nervous system. It will also cover the connection between the nervous system and the muscular system, the mechanics of musculoskeletal tissues and the physics of the muscular system in relation to its ability to generate movement and force. (Prerequisite: BIME-191 and BIME-370 and (PHYS-212 or (PHYS-208 and PHYS-209) and BIOG-240 and MATH-221 and (BIME-250 or CHME-230) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
BIME-499
Co-op (fall and summer)
One semester of paid work experience in biomedical engineering. (This course is restricted to BIME-BS Major students.) CO OP (Fall, Spring).
0
MATH-251
Probability and Statistics for Engineers I (General Education)
This course introduces sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability and independence, distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions (discrete and continuous), the central limit theorem, descriptive statistics, interval estimation, and applications of probability and statistics to real-world problems. A statistical package such as Minitab or R is used for data analysis and statistical applications. (Prerequisites: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH 182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
Fourth Year
BIME-411
Systems Physiology II (WI-PR)
The focus of this course will be on the interaction between organ systems for the purpose of maintaining overall homeostasis. Attention will be paid to feedback mechanisms that involve electrical and chemical feedback and control systems. The interactions between systems (cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal) and how they affect fluid and electrolyte balance, material exchange and disease processes will be discussed. Throughout the course, diseases and disorders of the various systems will be discussed. Students will learn to analyze the systems in a quantitative manner based on engineering analysis. (Prerequisites: BIME-320 and BIME-410 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
BIME-450
Numerical Analysis of Complex Biosystems
Numerical techniques necessary for engineering analysis are introduced that build upon concepts from core mathematics and engineering courses. Mathematical problems naturally arising in biomedical engineering are used to motivate the course topics and techniques taught. Tools such as MATLAB and Excel spreadsheets are used to implement numerical methods and examine data results. Topics include root-finding techniques for nonlinear equations, curve fitting using linear regression techniques, methods for solving systems of linear equations, numerical differentiation and integration methods, optimization techniques, and methods for reducing numerical error. (Prerequisites: (BIME-440 or BIME-360) and MATH-221 and (STAT-251 or MATH-251) or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
BIME-491
Quantitative Physiological Signal Analysis Lab
Laboratory experiments are conducted to explore and reinforce fundamental principles and concepts introduced in BIME-410 (Systems Physiology I) and BIME-440 (Biomedical Signals and Analysis). The experimental procedures involve measuring results, analyzing and interpreting data and drawing objective conclusions. Emphasis is also placed on proper documentation and effective presentation of findings and results. Laboratory experiments will be conducted to investigate pressure, volume and flow relationships of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems including the inherent variability and dynamic response to perturbations. Signal processing methods will be utilized to address ubiquitous artifacts found in measured physiological signals. (Prerequisite: BIME-410 and (BIME-440 or BIME-360) or equivalent courses.) Lab 3 (Fall).
1
BIME-499
Co-op (spring and summer)
One semester of paid work experience in biomedical engineering. (This course is restricted to BIME-BS Major students.) CO OP (Fall, Spring).
0
ISEE-325
Engineering Statistics and Design of Experiments
This course covers statistics for use in engineering as well as the primary concepts of experimental design. The first portion of the course will cover: Point estimation; hypothesis testing and confidence intervals; one- and two-sample inference. The remainder of the class will be spent on concepts of design and analysis of experiments. Lectures and assignments will incorporate real-world science and engineering examples, including studies found in the literature. (Prerequisites: STAT-251 or MATH-251 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
 
General Education – Immersion
3
 
Open Elective
3
Fifth Year
BIME-460
Dynamics and Control of Biomedical Systems
Application of engineering analysis, modeling, problem solving and design skills to characterize and manipulate the operation of biomedical systems for the purpose of remediating, supplanting, replacing or enhancing the function of physiological processes. This presumes that those same tools and skills can be used to model the observed and/or known function of the physiological systems and processes under consideration. In addition to lectures, homework and examinations, the course will a project oriented assignment to design and evaluate a model that faithfully duplicates and predicts the operation of that process or system. (Prerequisites: BIME-411 and (BIME-440 or BIME-360) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
BIME-492
Systems Physiology Control and Dynamics Lab
Laboratory experiments are conducted to explore and reinforce fundamental principles and concepts introduced in BIME-411 (Systems Physiology II) and BIME-460 (Dynamics and Control of Biomedical Systems). The experimental procedures involve measuring results, analyzing and interpreting data and drawing objective conclusions. Emphasis is also placed on proper documentation and effective presentation of findings and results. Laboratory experiments and simulations will be conducted to enable the prediction, observation and characterization common physiological processes and systems. (Prerequisite: BIME-411 and ISEE-325 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: BIME-460 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall).
1
BIME-497
Multidisciplinary Senior Design I
This is the first in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real-world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. This first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. The second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (5th yr KGCOE and BIME-499) Lecture 6 (Fall).
3
BIME-498
Multidisciplinary Senior Design II
This is the second in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real-world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. The first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. This second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: BIME-497 or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Spring).
3
 
Professional Electives
6
 
Open Electives
6
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
 
General Education – Immersion 2, 3
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
129

Please see General Education Curriculum (GE) for more information..

(WI-PR) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Combined Accelerated Bachelor's/Master's Degrees

The curriculum below outlines the typical course sequence(s) for combined accelerated degrees available with this bachelor's degree.

Biomedical Engineering, BS degree/Science, Technology and Public Policy, MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
BIME-181
Intro to Biomedical Engineering
This course will provide an overview of the discipline. It will consist of the following components: 1) Overview of the discipline. 2) Introduction of an engineering design methodology applicable to biomedical problems. 3) Opportunity to address a simple biomedical engineering-related problem that requires formulating a problem statement, conducting research, proposing a solution, preparing a summary report, and presenting results. 4) Introduction to team dynamics, organization and interpersonal communication associated with working with a multidisciplinary team. (This course is restricted to BIME-BS Major students.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
1
BIME-191
Introduction to Programming for Biomedical Engineers
This course introduces basic computational problem solving techniques used in engineering. Topics include: 1) Use of common engineering tools (Excel, Matlab) to analyze data, 2) Development of algorithms and flowcharts to solve engineering problems, 3) Application of basic programming concepts (input/output methods, variable types, repetition structures, decision structures, and subprograms) to create user-friendly computer programs (VBA, Matlab) that perform complex engineering calculations. (Prerequisites: BIME-181 or EGEN-100 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 4 (Spring).
3
CHMG-141
General & Analytical Chemistry I
This is a general chemistry course for students in the life and physical sciences. College chemistry is presented as a science based on empirical evidence that is placed into the context of conceptual, visual, and mathematical models. Students will learn the concepts, symbolism, and fundamental tools of chemistry necessary to carry on a discourse in the language of chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between atomic structure, chemical bonds, and the transformation of these bonds through chemical reactions. The fundamentals of organic chemistry are introduced throughout the course to emphasize the connection between chemistry and the other sciences. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
CHMG-142
General & Analytical Chemistry II
The course covers the thermodynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions. The relationship between energy and entropy change as the driving force of chemical processes is emphasized through the study of aqueous solutions. Specifically, the course takes a quantitative look at: 1) solubility equilibrium, 2) acid-base equilibrium, 3) oxidation-reduction reactions and 4) chemical kinetics. (Prerequisites: CHMG-141 or CHMG-131 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
CHMG-145
General & Analytical Chemistry I Lab
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-141 lecture material. The course emphasizes laboratory techniques and data analysis skills. Topics include: gravimetric, volumetric, thermal, titration and spectrophotometric analyses, and the use of these techniques to analyze chemical reactions. (Corequisite: CHMG-141 or CHMG-131 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
1
CHMG-146
General & Analytical Chemistry II Lab
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-142 lecture material. The course emphasizes the use of experiments as a tool for chemical analysis and the reporting of results in formal lab reports. Topics include the quantitative analysis of a multicomponent mixture using complexation and double endpoint titration, pH measurement, buffers and pH indicators, the kinetic study of a redox reaction, and the electrochemical analysis of oxidation reduction reactions. (Prerequisites: CHMG-131 or CHMG-141 or equivalent course. Corequisites: CHMG-142 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
1
MATH-181
Calculus I (General Education – Mathematical Perspective A)
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals. (Prerequisites: MATH-111 or (NMTH-220 and NMTH-260 or NMTH-272 or NMTH-275) or equivalent courses with a minimum grade of B-, or a score of at least 60% on the RIT Mathematics Placement Exam. Co-requisites: MATH-181R or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
MATH-182
Calculus II (General Education – Mathematical Perspective B)
This is the second in a two-course sequence. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or MATH-181A or equivalent course. Co-requisites: MATH-182R or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
PHYS-211
University Physics I (General Education – Scientific Principles Perspective)
This is a course in calculus-based physics for science and engineering majors. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton's Laws, gravitation, work and energy, momentum and impulse, conservation laws, systems of particles, rotational motion, static equilibrium, mechanical oscillations and waves, and data presentation/analysis. The course is taught in a workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH-181 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: MATH-182 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
YOPS-010
RIT 365: RIT Connections
RIT 365 students participate in experiential learning opportunities designed to launch them into their career at RIT, support them in making multiple and varied connections across the university, and immerse them in processes of competency development. Students will plan for and reflect on their first-year experiences, receive feedback, and develop a personal plan for future action in order to develop foundational self-awareness and recognize broad-based professional competencies. (This class is restricted to incoming 1st year or global campus students.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
General Education – Artistic Perspective
3
 
General Education – Elective
3
 
General Education – First Year Writing (WI)
3
Second Year
BIME-099 
BME Career Seminar
The “BME Careers” seminar series helps students learn more about the field through the experiences of other students, faculty, alumni, and working engineers. The series provides resources that will help them succeed at RIT and in the work force. Questions such as “What can I do as a BME?” and “How does your company use BMEs?” are complicated. Rather than explore these questions in a single session, we’re using this seminar series to help students explore these questions over the course of the year. (Prerequisites: EGEN-99 or equivalent course.) Lecture 1 (Spring).
0
BIME-200 
Introductory Musculoskeletal Biomechanics
This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics in the context of biomechanics. The course is designed to provide students with an understanding of how the musculoskeletal system reacts to various mechanical forces applied to it in both static and dynamic conditions. Sporting examples are used to illustrate how classical Newtonian mechanics is applied in human locomotion externally, in interactions with the environment. The course describes how basics of kinetics and kinematics are used to analyze the mechanics of human movement and inanimate objects. The main areas addressed are static equilibrium, mechanical stability, linear and angular kinematics, motion with constant and non-constant acceleration, collision and conservation of momentum, work, energy, and power. The course develops an awareness and appreciation of both qualitative and quantitative data collection methods within the field of biomechanics. In addition to rigid body mechanics, the course also introduces students to the concepts of stress and strain and how they affect muscle tissue and bones. Mechanical properties such as stiffness, strength, toughness, and fatigue resistance are considered in the context of bone structures and loading. (Prerequisites: PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or 1017-312 or 1017-312T or 1017-389 or PHYS-206 and PHYS-207 or equivalent course and student standing in the BIME-BS or ENGRX-UND program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
BIME-250
Biosystems Process Analysis
A first course for biomedical engineers introducing units, physical properties, dimensions, dimensional analysis, data analysis and data presentation for engineering, stoichiometry of biological reactions, simple material and energy balances for batch and continuous systems in steady and unsteady states. This course provides the students with the essential skills required to analyze biosystems, and special focus is given to developing problem solving skills with a biological context. (Prerequisite: MATH-182 and CHMG-142 or equivalent course or student standing in the BIME-BS or ENGRX-UND program. Co-requisite: BIOG-140 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
BIME-320
Fluid Mechanics
This course exposes students to the fundamentals of static and flowing fluids at both large-scale (control volumes) and local differential scales. Student learn how to examine forces on solids due to static and flowing fluids, estimate head losses and pumping requirements in piping systems. The art of engineering approximation is examined through estimates of forces due to flow on solids, as well as limiting cases involving internal pipe flows with friction factors. Exact solutions of local differential equations of fluid mechanics are considered under both steady state and transient conditions, and these analyses are used to determine forces in control volume analysis of bodies. The important interplay between differential and control volume analyses in solving problems is emphasized. Lastly, students are taught to make analogies about the concepts learned in generic fluid mechanics and apply them to the circulatory system, while outlining appropriate limitations. (Prerequisites: (PHYS-206 or PHYS-211) and (MATH-221 or MATH-231) or equivalent courses. Co-requisite: MATH-221 or MATH-231 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
BIME-370
Introduction to Biomaterials Science
This course is intended to provide an overview of materials used in biomedical applications, both internal and external to the human body. The specific objective of this course is to present the principles which apply to the properties and selection of materials used in medical applications. Topics include an introduction to deformable mechanics and viscoelasticity; structure and properties of metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites; fundamental composition of biological tissues; and principles associated with the interaction between biological tissues and artificial materials. (Prerequisites: BIME-200 and CHMG-142 or equivalent courses. Co-requisite: BIOG-141 or BIOG-240 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
BIME-391
Biomechanics and Biomaterials Lab
Laboratory experiments are conducted to explore and reinforce fundamental principles and concepts introduced in BIME-200 (Introduction to Musculoskeletal Biomechanics) and BIME-370 (Introduction to Biomaterial Science). The experimental procedures involve measuring results, analyzing and interpreting data and drawing objective conclusions. Emphasis is also placed on proper documentation and effective presentation of findings and results. Lab procedures involve manipulation and measurements of anatomical structures and samples as well as equipment and materials designed to simulate naturally occurring tissues and structures. (Prerequisite: BIME-200 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: BIME-370 and (BIME-182 or BIME-191) or equivalent courses.) Lab 3, Lecture 1 (Spring).
2
BIOG-140
Cell and Molecular Biology for Engineers I
This is the first course of a two-course sequence designed to introduce biomedical engineering students to the molecular and cellular basis of life with a particular emphasis on the integration of molecular systems that underscore human physiology. This course will start with the basic chemistry of biological macromolecules and then explore the cell starting from the nucleus and moving outward. Major topics will include: DNA replication; molecular basis of inheritance; the biology of RNA; gene expression; protein synthesis; the secretory pathways; and enzyme kinetics. Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall).
3
BIOG-240
Cell and Molecular Biology for Engineers II
This is the second of a two-course sequence designed to introduce biomedical engineering students to the molecular and cellular basis of life with a particular emphasis on the integration of molecular systems in human physiology. This course will continue exploring sub-cellular systems by touring the function of each cellular organelle and describing the pathologic consequences that result from interruption of its normal function. Major topics will include: cellular energy production; the cytoskeleton; the lysosome; the plasma membrane; vesicle transport; cell-cell communication; signaling pathways; the cell cycle; and cell division. (Prerequisites: BIOG-140 or equivalent course.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Spring).
3
EGEN-099
Engineering Co-op Preparation
This course will prepare students, who are entering their second year of study, for both the job search and employment in the field of engineering. Students will learn strategies for conducting a successful job search, including the preparation of resumes and cover letters; behavioral interviewing techniques and effective use of social media in the application process. Professional and ethical responsibilities during the job search and for co-op and subsequent professional experiences will be discussed. (This course is restricted to students in Kate Gleason College of Engineering with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 1 (Fall, Spring).
0
MATH-221
Multivariable and Vector Calculus
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes a study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, Stokes' Theorem, Green's Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-219. (Prerequisite: C- or better MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
4
MATH-231
Differential Equations
This course is an introduction to the study of ordinary differential equations and their applications. Topics include solutions to first order equations and linear second order equations, method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, linear independence and the Wronskian, vibrating systems, and Laplace transforms. (Prerequisite: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH-182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
PHYS-212
University Physics II (General Education – Natural Science Inquiry Perspective)
This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses. (Prerequisites: (PHYS-211 or PHYS-211A or PHYS-206 or PHYS-216) or (MECE-102, MECE-103 and MECE-205) and (MATH-182 or MATH-172 or MATH-182A) or equivalent courses. Grades of C- or better are required in all prerequisite courses.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
4
 
General Education – Ethical Perspective
3
Third Year
BIME-360
Biomedical Signal Analysis
Introduction to and application of signal processing techniques to evaluate and manipulate continuous time signals presumed to originate from systems that are linear, time invariant, and continuous time in nature. (Prerequisites: (BIME-182 or BIME-191) and MATH-231 or equivalent courses. Co-requisites: BIME-410 and (STAT-251 or MATH-251) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
BIME-407
Medical Device Design
This course is an introduction to the biodesign process used for innovating medical technologies. Student teams will apply a needs-based assessment strategy to identify opportunities in a biomedical related field such as assistive technologies and rehabilitation engineering. Incorporating CAD will culminate in a virtual medical device prototype. Concepts of intellectual property, regulatory considerations, and reimbursement and business models will be introduced. (Prerequisite: BIME-499 or MECE-499 or ISEE-499 or CHME-499 or EEEE-499 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
BIME-410
Quantitative Physiology
This course is concerned with the fundamental aspects of those human physiological systems that sense and interact with our environment. In particular, the nervous system and the musculoskeletal system. This course will cover the physiology of electrically excitable cells and tissues with a focus on the electrical signals propagated by neurons in the nervous system. It will discuss the special senses with a focus on the sense of touch, hearing, and vision. It will also introduce the differences and relationships between speed, specificity, and sensitivity of signaling mechanism of the nervous system. It will also cover the connection between the nervous system and the muscular system, the mechanics of musculoskeletal tissues and the physics of the muscular system in relation to its ability to generate movement and force. (Prerequisite: BIME-191 and BIME-370 and (PHYS-212 or (PHYS-208 and PHYS-209) and BIOG-240 and MATH-221 and (BIME-250 or CHME-230) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
BIME-499
Co-op (fall, summer)
One semester of paid work experience in biomedical engineering. (This course is restricted to BIME-BS Major students.) CO OP (Fall, Spring).
0
MATH-251
Probability and Statistics for Engineers I
This course introduces sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability and independence, distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions (discrete and continuous), the central limit theorem, descriptive statistics, interval estimation, and applications of probability and statistics to real-world problems. A statistical package such as Minitab or R is used for data analysis and statistical applications. (Prerequisites: MATH-173 or MATH-182 or MATH 182A or equivalent course.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
 
General Education – Global Perspective
3
Fourth Year
BIME-411
Quantitative Systems Physiology
The focus of this course will be on the interaction between organ systems for the purpose of maintaining overall homeostasis. Attention will be paid to feedback mechanisms that involve electrical and chemical feedback and control systems. The interactions between systems (cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal) and how they affect fluid and electrolyte balance, material exchange and disease processes will be discussed. Throughout the course, diseases and disorders of the various systems will be discussed. Students will learn to analyze the systems in a quantitative manner based on engineering analysis. (Prerequisites: BIME-320 and BIME-410 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
BIME-450
Numerical Analysis of Complex Biosystems
Numerical techniques necessary for engineering analysis are introduced that build upon concepts from core mathematics and engineering courses. Mathematical problems naturally arising in biomedical engineering are used to motivate the course topics and techniques taught. Tools such as MATLAB and Excel spreadsheets are used to implement numerical methods and examine data results. Topics include root-finding techniques for nonlinear equations, curve fitting using linear regression techniques, methods for solving systems of linear equations, numerical differentiation and integration methods, optimization techniques, and methods for reducing numerical error. (Prerequisites: (BIME-440 or BIME-360) and MATH-221 and (STAT-251 or MATH-251) or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
BIME-491
Quantitative Physiological Signal Analysis Lab
Laboratory experiments are conducted to explore and reinforce fundamental principles and concepts introduced in BIME-410 (Systems Physiology I) and BIME-440 (Biomedical Signals and Analysis). The experimental procedures involve measuring results, analyzing and interpreting data and drawing objective conclusions. Emphasis is also placed on proper documentation and effective presentation of findings and results. Laboratory experiments will be conducted to investigate pressure, volume and flow relationships of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems including the inherent variability and dynamic response to perturbations. Signal processing methods will be utilized to address ubiquitous artifacts found in measured physiological signals. (Prerequisite: BIME-410 and (BIME-440 or BIME-360) or equivalent courses.) Lab 3 (Fall).
1
BIME-499
Co-op (summer)
One semester of paid work experience in biomedical engineering. (This course is restricted to BIME-BS Major students.) CO OP (Fall, Spring).
0
ISEE-325
Engineering Statistics and Design of Experiments
This course covers statistics for use in engineering as well as the primary concepts of experimental design. The first portion of the course will cover: Point estimation; hypothesis testing and confidence intervals; one- and two-sample inference. The remainder of the class will be spent on concepts of design and analysis of experiments. Lectures and assignments will incorporate real-world science and engineering examples, including studies found in the literature. (Prerequisites: STAT-251 or MATH-251 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
PUBL-701
Graduate Policy Analysis
This course provides graduate students with necessary tools to help them become effective policy analysts. The course places particular emphasis on understanding the policy process, the different approaches to policy analysis, and the application of quantitative and qualitative methods for evaluating public policies. Students will apply these tools to contemporary public policy decision making at the local, state, federal, and international levels. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
PUBL-702
Graduate Decision Analysis
This course provides students with an introduction to decision science and analysis. The course focuses on several important tools for making good decisions, including decision trees, including forecasting, risk analysis, and multi-attribute decision making. Students will apply these tools to contemporary public policy decision making at the local, state, federal, and international levels. Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
STSO-710
Graduate Science and Technology Policy Seminar
Examines how federal and international policies are developed to influence research and development, innovation, and the transfer of technology in the United States and other selected nations. Students in the course will apply basic policy skills, concepts, and methods to contemporary science and technology policy topics. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Seminar (Fall).
3
 
BIME Professional Elective
3
 
General Education – Immersion 1,2
6
 
Open Electives
3
 
General Education – Social Perspective
3
Fifth Year
BIME-460
Dynamics and Control of Biomedical Systems
Application of engineering analysis, modeling, problem solving and design skills to characterize and manipulate the operation of biomedical systems for the purpose of remediating, supplanting, replacing or enhancing the function of physiological processes. This presumes that those same tools and skills can be used to model the observed and/or known function of the physiological systems and processes under consideration. In addition to lectures, homework and examinations, the course will a project oriented assignment to design and evaluate a model that faithfully duplicates and predicts the operation of that process or system. (Prerequisites: BIME-411 and (BIME-440 or BIME-360) or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
BIME-492
Systems Physiology Control and Dynamics Lab
Laboratory experiments are conducted to explore and reinforce fundamental principles and concepts introduced in BIME-411 (Systems Physiology II) and BIME-460 (Dynamics and Control of Biomedical Systems). The experimental procedures involve measuring results, analyzing and interpreting data and drawing objective conclusions. Emphasis is also placed on proper documentation and effective presentation of findings and results. Laboratory experiments and simulations will be conducted to enable the prediction, observation and characterization common physiological processes and systems. (Prerequisite: BIME-411 and ISEE-325 or equivalent course. Co-requisites: BIME-460 or equivalent course.) Lab 3 (Fall).
1
BIME-497
Multidisciplinary Senior Design I
This is the first in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real-world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. This first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. The second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (5th yr KGCOE and BIME-499) Lecture 6 (Fall).
3
BIME-498
Multidisciplinary Senior Design II (WI-PR)
This is the second in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real-world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. The first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. This second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design. (Prerequisites: BIME-497 or equivalent course.) Lecture 6 (Spring).
3
PUBL-700
Readings in Public Policy
An in-depth inquiry into key contemporary public policy issues. Students will be exposed to a wide range of important public policy texts, and will learn how to write a literature review in a policy area of their choosing. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Seminar (Fall).
3
PUBL-703
Evaluation and Research Design
The focus of this course is on evaluation of program outcomes and research design. Students will explore the questions and methodologies associated with meeting programmatic outcomes, secondary or unanticipated effects, and an analysis of alternative means for achieving program outcomes. Critique of evaluation research methodologies will also be considered. Seminar (Spring).
3
 
BIME – Professional Elective
3
 
General Education - Immersion 3
3
 
Graduate Policy Elective
3
 
Open Elective
3
Choose one of the following:
6
   PUBL-785
 Capstone Experience
The Public Policy Capstone Experience serves as a culminating experience for those MS in Science, Technology and Public Policy students who chose this option in the Public Policy Department. Over the course of the semester, students will have the opportunity to investigate and address contemporary topics in science and technology policy using analytic skills and theoretical knowledge learned over the course of their MS degree. Project 1 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
   PUBL-790
 Public Policy Thesis
The master's thesis in science, technology, and public policy requires the student to select a thesis topic, advisor and committee; prepare a written thesis proposal for approval by the faculty; present and defend the thesis before a thesis committee; and submit a bound copy of the thesis to the library and to the program chair. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Thesis 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
 
   PUBL-798
 Comprehensive Exam plus 2 Graduate Electives
 
Total Semester Credit Hours
150

Please see General Education Curriculum for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Admissions and Financial Aid

This program is STEM designated when studying on campus and full time.

First-Year Admission

A strong performance in a college preparatory program is expected. This includes:

  • 4 years of English
  • 3 years of social studies and/or history
  • 4 years of math is required and must include algebra, geometry, algebra 2/trigonometry, and pre-calculus. Calculus is preferred.
  • 2-3 years of science. Biology, chemistry, and physics are required.

Transfer Admission

Transfer course recommendations without associate degree
Pre-engineering courses such as calculus, calculus-based physics, chemistry, and liberal arts.

Appropriate associate degree programs for transfer
AS degree in engineering science

Learn How to Apply

Financial Aid and Scholarships

100% of all incoming first-year and transfer students receive aid.

RIT’s personalized and comprehensive financial aid program includes scholarships, grants, loans, and campus employment programs. When all these are put to work, your actual cost may be much lower than the published estimated cost of attendance.
Learn more about financial aid and scholarships

Accreditation

The BS program in biomedical engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET. Visit the college’s accreditation page for information on enrollment and graduation data, program educational objectives, and student outcomes.

Faculty

Research

The faculty and students in the Kate Gleason College of Engineering are engaging in numerous areas of research, which takes place across all of our engineering disciplines and often involves other colleges at RIT, local health care institutions, and major industry partners. Explore the college's key research initiatives to learn more about our research in:

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