Chemical Engineering Bachelor of science degree

1b1d4fd4-ecb2-4f05-b55d-6f2421305953 | 86015

Overview

From nano-scale composites, pharmaceuticals, plastics, fibers, metals, and ceramics to the development of alternative energy systems, biomedical materials and therapies, and strategies to minimize the environmental impact of technological advancements.


Chemical engineers are experts at developing processes to transform raw materials into the vast array of high-value chemicals required by modern society. They create novel materials that are at the heart of virtually every product we use, such as nano-scale composites, pharmaceuticals, plastics, fibers, metals, coatings, and ceramics. Chemical engineers do more than just create materials. The chemical engineering degree prepares students to solve many problems of societal interest, such as reducing the environmental impact of technological advancements, solving problems related to alternative energy systems, and developing biomedical materials and therapies.

Chemical engineering applies the core scientific disciplines of chemistry, physics, biology, and mathematics to transform raw materials or chemicals into more useful or valuable forms, invariably in processes that involve chemical change. All engineers employ mathematics, physics, and engineering art to overcome technical problems in a safe and economical fashion. The chemical engineer provides the critical level of expertise needed to solve problems in which chemical specificity and change have particular relevance. They not only create new, more effective ways to manufacture chemicals, they also work collaboratively with chemists to pioneer the development of high-tech materials for specialized applications. Well-known contributions include the development and commercialization of synthetic rubber, synthetic fiber, pharmaceuticals, and plastics. Chemical engineers contribute significantly to advances in the food industry, alternative energy systems, semiconductor manufacturing, and environmental modeling and remediation. A special focus on process engineering cultivates a systems perspective that makes chemical engineers extremely versatile and capable of handling a wide spectrum of technical problems.

Students develop a firm and practical grasp of engineering principles and the underlying science associated with traditional and emerging chemical engineering applications. They also learn to tie together phenomena at small scales (micro- and nano-scale) with the behavior of systems at the macro-scale. While chemical engineers have always excelled at analyzing and designing processes with multiple length scales, modern chemical engineering applications require this knowledge to be extended to the nano-scale. The program provides training to address this emerging need.

How is chemical engineering different from chemistry?

Virtually every aspect of a modern industrial economy is critically dependent upon chemical engineering for manufacturing bulk and specialty chemicals and high-tech materials needed to create a limitless array of value-added products. Chemical engineering applies the core scientific disciplines of chemistry, physics, biology, and mathematics to transform raw materials or chemicals into more useful or valuable forms, invariably in processes that involve chemical change. They work in multidisciplinary teams to create novel materials that are at the heart of virtually every product and service that enhances our quality of life. Examples include nano scale composites, pharmaceuticals, plastics, fibers, metals, and ceramics. Key applications include the development of alternative energy systems, biomedical materials and therapies, and strategies to minimize the environmental impact of technological advancements.

The lines between the function of chemists and chemical engineers can be blurred, but a general distinction can be made between the function of the two disciplines. Perhaps the clearest distinction can be made in the area of chemical transformation. Typically, chemists develop new molecules via chemical reaction, examine the underlying mechanisms involved, and make precise measurements of both physical and organic chemistry parameters on a bench scale in small volumes. Chemical engineers utilize the work of the chemists to build processes to manufacture and purify chemicals and new materials on a larger scale. Using their knowledge of scientific principles (physical and organic chemistry integrated with physics, mathematics, and biology) and design constraints (such as economics, environmental requirements) chemical engineers develop processes to manufacture raw materials with desired purity on a scale that meets the demands of virtually every industry in our modern society.

Educational objectives

Graduates of the BS degree in chemical engineering are expected, within a few years of graduation, to have demonstrated an ability to:

  • draw upon the fundamental knowledge, skills, and tools of chemical engineering to develop scale-appropriate system-based engineering solutions that satisfy constraints imposed by a global society.
  • enhance their skills through formal education and training, independent inquiry, and professional development.
  • work independently as well as collaboratively with others, and to have demonstrated leadership, accountability, initiative, and ethical and social responsibility.
  • successfully pursue graduate degrees at the master's and/or doctorate levels for those with relevant qualifications.

Plan of study

The core curriculum of the chemical engineering major provides students with a solid foundation in engineering principles and their underlying science. Students choose professional technical electives that provide them with more depth in the chemical engineering field or breadth in other engineering disciplines. These electives may be chosen from those offered within the major, as well as from a department-approved list of engineering courses offered throughout the college. A capstone design experience in the fifth year integrates chemical engineering theory, principles, and processes in a collaborative team environment. Mathematics and science courses, free electives, and liberal arts courses round out the curriculum.

Capstone experience

Students complete a capstone experience that includes two courses: Design with Constraint and Advanced Design Capstone.

Design with Constraint is taught in a workshop structure with lectures and in-class application of concepts. Students examine typical constraints on design and their integration with technology. Economics, environmental considerations, hazards analysis, ethics, and globalization and supply chain management are considered. Modern examples that integrate knowledge of unit operations and processes with design constraints are also discussed.

In Advanced Design Capstone students work in teams to design and simulate a realistic chemical manufacturing plant. An assigned project requires students to draw upon, and integrate, the knowledge they have acquired from all core chemical engineering courses taken over the previous five years. The course is taught in the Chemical Engineering Computer Lab and makes extensive use of both chemical process simulation software (ChemCad), software for drawing piping and instrumentation diagrams (P&ID’s), and online resources that chemical engineers use to size and select parts and equipment. The course constitutes a project-based application of concepts and skills developed throughout the curriculum.

Cooperative education

Students are required to complete 48 weeks of cooperative education, which is full-time, paid work experience that enables students to apply what they have learned to co-op positions in companies around the country and the world. This work experience, coupled with the professional networks created by our students and alumni, often translates into jobs after graduation. Additionally, for those students who develop an interest in research and demonstrate aptitude in the classroom, a limited number of co-op opportunities are possible in which students will work alongside professors as they conduct research in the chemical engineering field.

Accreditation

The BS program in chemical engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org/. Visit the college's accreditation page for information on enrollment and graduation data, program educational objectives, and student outcomes.

 

Industries


  • Manufacturing

  • Aerospace

  • Chemical

  • Environmental Services

  • Pharmaceuticals

94%

outcome rate of graduates

$65k

median first-year salary of graduates

Latest News

  • April 1, 2019

    Large group of students stands with dean.

    RIT’s College of Liberal Arts honors students for writing excellence

    RIT’s College of Liberal Arts honored student achievement in writing on Friday with the presentation of more than a dozen writing awards for essays varying from sanctuary cities, how democracies can withstand outside meddling, and the excavation, preservation and reconstruction of a London theater where Shakespearian plays debuted.

  • April 1, 2019

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    RIT Venture Fund helps turn ideas into businesses

    Launched in 2012, the RIT Venture Fund invests in early-stage, high-growth companies founded by students, faculty, staff, alumni and RIT Venture Creations client companies in fields that complement RIT’s core academic competencies. From block chain and clean-energy technology to telecommunications, manufacturing and game development, the Venture Fund looks to create industry diversity and a vibrant entrepreneurial ecosystem.

  • November 6, 2018

    Patricia Taboada-Serrano poses for a photo in front of a fume hood in a lab.

    Faculty-researcher honored as Emerging Investigator

    Patricia Taboada-Serrano, an associate professor of chemical engineering, was named a 2018 Emerging Investigator by the American Chemical Society for her work in developing water treatment technology through molecular engineering

Curriculum

Chemical engineering, BS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CHME-181
Chemical Engineering Insights I
This is the first course of a two-course sequence that provides the foundation for success in the chemical engineering program at RIT and the field of chemical engineering. This course provides a historical perspective on the origin of the discipline and an overview of the traditional and contemporary issues that chemical engineers address. Within this context, the course compares and contrasts the differing roles of chemical engineers and chemists in society. Additionally the course introduces the methodology chemical engineers use to solve problems, engineering ethics, and career options in chemical engineering.
1
CHME-182
Chemical Engineering Insights II
This course examines how chemical engineering analysis can be applied to address some of society’s current and future challenges. Particular attention is focused on the size and scale of a system and its affect on the engineering constraints and the ultimate solution of problems. The course enables students to recognize that the processes and equipment that chemical engineers design to solve local problems affect the broader problems that society faces, such as the supply of energy and preservation of the environment. The course demonstrates the power of the system balance as an essential tool for engineering analysis, and provides students with some elementary training in its use.
1
CHMG-141
General and Analytical Chemistry I
This is a general chemistry course for students in the life and physical sciences. College chemistry is presented as a science based on empirical evidence that is placed into the context of conceptual, visual, and mathematical models. Students will learn the concepts, symbolism, and fundamental tools of chemistry necessary to carry on a discourse in the language of chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between atomic structure, chemical bonds, and the transformation of these bonds through chemical reactions. The fundamentals of organic chemistry are introduced throughout the course to emphasize the connection between chemistry and the other sciences.
3
CHMG-145
General and Analytical Chemistry I Lab
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-141 lecture material. The course emphasizes laboratory techniques and data analysis skills. Topics include: gravimetric, volumetric, thermal, titration and spectrophotometric analyses, and the use of these techniques to analyze chemical reactions.
1
CHMG-142
General and Analytical Chemistry II
The course covers the thermodynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions. The relationship between energy and entropy change as the driving force of chemical processes is emphasized through the study of aqueous solutions. Specifically, the course takes a quantitative look at: 1) solubility equilibrium, 2) acid-base equilibrium, 3) oxidation-reduction reactions and 4) chemical kinetics.
3
CHMG-146
General and Analytical Chemistry II Lab
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-142 lecture material. The course emphasizes the use of experiments as a tool for chemical analysis and the reporting of results in formal lab reports. Topics include the quantitative analysis of a multicomponent mixture using complexation and double endpoint titration, pH measurement, buffers and pH indicators, the kinetic study of a redox reaction, and the electrochemical analysis of oxidation reduction reactions.
1
MATH-181
Calculus I
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals.
4
MATH-182
Calculus II
This is the second in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates.
4
PHYS-211
University Physics I
This is a course in calculus-based physics for science and engineering majors. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton's Laws, gravitation, work and energy, momentum and impulse, conservation laws, systems of particles, rotational motion, static equilibrium, mechanical oscillations and waves, and data presentation/analysis. The course is taught in a workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses.
4
ACSC-010
Year One
The Year One class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, personal success, leadership development, social responsibility and life academic skills awareness and application. Year One is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build relationships and help them become an integral part of the campus community.
0
 
First Year Writing
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
CHME-230
Chemical Process Analysis
A first course for chemical engineers, introducing units, dimensions and dimensional analysis, simple material balances for batch and continuous systems in steady and unsteady states with and without chemical reaction, and elementary phase equilibrium in multiple component systems. Energy balances on non-reactive systems in open and closed systems are introduced.
3
CHMO-231
Organic Chemistry I 
This course is a study of the structure, nomenclature, reactions and synthesis of the following functional groups: alkanes, alkenes, alkynes. This course also introduces chemical bonding, IR and NMR spectroscopy, acid and base reactions, stereochemistry, nucleophilic substitution reactions, and alkene and alkyne reactions. In addition, the course provides an introduction to the use of mechanisms in describing and predicting organic reactions.
3
CHMO-235
Organic Chemistry I Lab
This course trains students to perform techniques important in an organic chemistry lab. The course also covers reactions from the accompanying lecture CHMO-231.
1
MATH-231
Differential Equations
This course is an introduction to the study of ordinary differential equations and their applications. Topics include solutions to first order equations and linear second order equations, method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, linear independence and the Wronskian, vibrating systems, and Laplace transforms.
3
STAT-205
Applied Statistics
This course covers basic statistical concepts and techniques including descriptive statistics, probability, inference, and quality control. The statistical package Minitab will be used to reinforce these techniques. The focus of this course is on statistical applications and quality improvement in engineering. This course is intended for engineering programs and has a calculus prerequisite. Note: This course may not be taken for credit if credit is to be earned in STAT-145 or STAT-155 or MATH 252..
3
CHME-310
Applied Thermodynamics
This is a course in the fundamentals of both single and multiple-component thermodynamics. The first and second laws of thermodynamics and concepts of entropy and equilibrium are examined in open and closed control volume systems. Energy, work, and heat requirements of various unit operations are examined. Equations of states and properties of fluids are explored. Phase transition and equilibrium involving single-and multiple components are examined for both ideal and non-ideal systems. Energy released/absorbed during chemical reaction and solution creation are imbedded in analysis of chemical engineering processes
3
CHME-320
Continuum Mechanics I
Fundamentals of static and flowing fluids are examined on both large-scale (control volumes) and local differential scales. Forces on solids due to static and flowing fluids are determined. Head losses and pumping requirements are considered in piping systems. The art of engineering approximation is examined through estimates of forces due to flow on solids, as well as various limiting cases involving internal pipe flows with friction factors. Exact solutions of local differential equations of fluid mechanics are considered under both steady state and transient conditions, and these analyses are used to determine forces in control volume analysis of bodies. The important interplay between differential and control volume analyses in solving problems is emphasized.
3
CHME-391
Chemical Engineering Principles Lab
Students are introduced to basic equipment and methodologies for designing laboratory experiments, measuring results, interpreting data, and drawing objective conclusions. Students work in teams to design experimental procedures, identify lab equipment, and assemble simple apparatus to achieve specific experimental goals.
2
CHMI-351
Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry I
This course covers descriptive inorganic reactions in terms of periodic trends. Topics will include nucleosynthesis and the birth of the universe, applications used in large-scale industrial processes and their environmental impacts, nanostructured materials, and bonding theory will also be discussed. A detailed study of solid-state chemistry and structure will also be addressed.
3
MATH-221
Multivariable and Vector Calculus
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes a study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, Stokes' Theorem, Green's Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-219.
4
EGEN-099
Engineering Co-op Preparation
This course will prepare students, who are entering their second year of study, for both the job search and employment in the field of engineering. Students will learn strategies for conducting a successful job search, including the preparation of resumes and cover letters; behavioral interviewing techniques and effective use of social media in the application process. Professional and ethical responsibilities during the job search and for co-op and subsequent professional experiences will be discussed.
0
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
 
Cooperative Education (summer) Co-op
 
Third Year
 
 
 
CHME-330
Mass Transfer Operations
This course covers the analysis and design of chemical processes for the separation and purification of mixtures. The course includes an introduction to the fundamentals of diffusion leading up to mass transfer coefficients and their use in solving a variety of engineering problems. Design methodologies are examined for equilibrium based processes (such as absorption, stripping, and distillation). Rate-based separation processes, including packed columns and batch adsorption, are examined and contrasted with equilibrium-based processes.
3
CHME-321
Continuum Mechanics II
This course is the continuation of Continuum Mechanics I, and focuses on fluid flow and heat transfer on a differential scale. Commonly-used approximations to the equations of fluid mechanics are considered, such as creeping, potential, and boundary layer flows. Scaling is introduced as a means of characterizing these regimes. General local differential equations and boundary conditions describing heat transfer are derived and solved in a variety of configurations. Simplifying approximations of conduction, convection, and radiation dominated heat transfer are introduced, and combined modes of transfer are analyzed. The performance of heat exchangers is analyzed for a variety of common configurations.
3
CHME-301
Analytical Tech. for Chemical Engineers I
Mathematical techniques necessary for engineering analysis are introduced that augment training from core mathematics and engineering courses. The spreadsheet environment is used to implement mathematical procedures and examine data results. Topics examined include roots of equations, curve fitting, statistics, Fourier analysis, solution of systems of algebraic equations, optimization, numerical differentiation and integration, and the solution of ordinary and partial differential equations. Techniques are applied to mathematical problems naturally arising in chemical engineering.
3
CHMA-231
Chemical Instrumental Analysis for Engineering
This course presents a preliminary treatment of instrumental theory and technique as well as hands on experience with modern chemical instrumentation. The course will cover the theory and implementation of spectroscopic, mass spectrometric, and chemical separations instrumentation and techniques. Instrumental techniques include: atomic and molecular emission and absorption and emission spectroscopies, atomic and molecular mass spectrometry, gas chromatography, and high performance liquid chromatography. Students will perform experiments utilizing modern chemical instrumentation and gain experience in analyzing data and presenting results experimental results.
3
 
Cooperative Education (fall/summer)
Co-op
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
 
LAS Immersion 1
3
Fourth Year
CHME-350
Multiple Scale Material Science
This course gives students fundamental background in the atomic and molecular structures of engineering materials and how they can be manipulated. The physical and chemical foundations of the thermal, electrical and optical properties of engineering materials are studied. The effect of fabrication on structure/material properties is examined, as well as criteria to select appropriate materials for engineering applications. A summary of nanomaterial properties and the prevalent methods of synthesis will also be highlighted.
3
CHME-340
Reaction Engineering
The fundamentals of chemical kinetics are integrated with the concepts of mass and energy conservation, from both a macroscopic and microscopic perspective, to develop models that describe the performance of chemical reactors. Topics include mass action kinetics and absolute rate theory, series and parallel reaction systems, and the mathematical modeling of various reactor configurations. The conceptual framework and tools are developed to understand and design chemical reactor processes and to interpret experimental data obtained on a laboratory scale to design pilot scale and full scale manufacturing processes.
4
CHME-302
Analytical Techniques for Chemical Engineers II
This course introduces the student to more advanced mathematical and numerical methods necessary for engineering analysis. Mathematical problems naturally arising in chemical engineering are used to motivate the course topics and techniques taught. The MATLAB programming environment is utilized to facilitate computation, and students learn to use MATLAB’s inbuilt tools as well as Simulink.. Topics examined include the solution of systems of linear and nonlinear equations and the solution of ordinary and partial differential equations (initial and boundary value problems). Some important topics covered in CHME-301 are re-examined in the MATLAB environment, such as roots of equations, curve fitting, and numerical integration and differentiation
3
CHME-491
Chemical Engineering Processes Lab
This course extends the laboratory experience from the previous Chemical Engineering Principles Lab, and focuses on unit operations common to engineering practice. Students work in teams to design experimental procedures on existing equipment, and to in some cases, manipulate experimental apparatus to achieve specific experimental goals.
2
 
LAS Immersion 2, 3
6
 
Cooperative Education (spring)
Co-op
Fifth Year
CHME-451
Analysis of Multi-Scale Processes
This course examines the use of larger scale chemical engineering processes to control and manipulate microscale phenomena.
3
CHME-492
Advanced Design Capstone
3
CHME-490
Design With Constraint
This course examines typical constraints on design and their integration with technology. Economics, environmental considerations, hazards analysis, ethics, and globalization and supply chain management ideas are among the concepts introduced. Modern examples that integrate knowledge of unit operations and processes with design constraints are examined.
3
PHYS-212
University Physics II
This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses.
4
CHME-401
System Dynamics and Control
The dynamic behavior of chemical process components is examined. The mathematics of Laplace transforms are examined extensively as a fundamental underpinning of control theory. Block diagrams, feedback control systems, and stability analysis are introduced.
3
 
Professional Technical Electives
9
 
Free Electives
6
Total Semester Credit Hours
129

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Professional technical electives

Course
CHME-421
Interfacial Phenomena
CHME-422
Introduction to Applied Rheology
Complex fluids encountered in manufacturing, commercial products, and in nature, such as polymer solutions and melts, blood and other biological fluids, foams, slurries and emulsions, exhibit complex flow behaviors called non-Newtonian because they are not exhibited by low-molecular-weight fluids like air and water. Rheology is the study of deformation and flow. Rheological phenomena, their connection to fluid microstructure, and the characterization of complex fluids using commercial instruments and constitutive equations are introduced. This foundation is applied to elements of materials processing including flow and heat transfer in tubes and in boundary layers, mixing, and the drag of liquid on particles. Specialized manufacturing methods such as extrusion and the pumps and mixers required for these fluids are covered.
CHME-431
Advanced Separation Processes
This upper-level undergraduate course builds on concepts taught in CHME-330 Mass Transfer Operations. Topics covered include adsorption, membrane separation, extraction, crystallization, and mechanical separation processes. Transient systems are introduced and analyzed to augment steady-state analyses from CHME-330. Case studies are examined to connect fundamental concepts to real world applications
CHME-489
Special Topics: Advanced Reaction Engineering
Topics and subject areas that are not among the courses listed here are frequently offered under the special topics title. Under the same title also may be found experimental courses that may be offered for the first time. Such courses are offered in a formal format; that is, regularly scheduled class sessions with an instructor. The level of complexity is commensurate with a senior-level undergraduate technical course.
CHME-489
Special Topics: Biochemical Engineering
Topics and subject areas that are not among the courses listed here are frequently offered under the special topics title. Under the same title also may be found experimental courses that may be offered for the first time. Such courses are offered in a formal format; that is, regularly scheduled class sessions with an instructor. The level of complexity is commensurate with a senior-level undergraduate technical course.
CHME-489
Special Topics: Electrochemical Engineering 
Topics and subject areas that are not among the courses listed here are frequently offered under the special topics title. Under the same title also may be found experimental courses that may be offered for the first time. Such courses are offered in a formal format; that is, regularly scheduled class sessions with an instructor. The level of complexity is commensurate with a senior-level undergraduate technical course.
CHME-489
Special Topics: Advanced Thermodynamics
Topics and subject areas that are not among the courses listed here are frequently offered under the special topics title. Under the same title also may be found experimental courses that may be offered for the first time. Such courses are offered in a formal format; that is, regularly scheduled class sessions with an instructor. The level of complexity is commensurate with a senior-level undergraduate technical course.

Accelerated dual degree options

Accelerated dual degree options are for undergraduate students with outstanding academic records. Upon acceptance, well-qualified undergraduate students can begin graduate study before completing their BS degree, shortening the time it takes to earn both degrees. Students should consult an academic adviser for more information.

Chemical engineering, BS degree/Science, technology and public policy, MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CHME-181
Chemical Engineering Insights I
This is the first course of a two-course sequence that provides the foundation for success in the chemical engineering program at RIT and the field of chemical engineering. This course provides a historical perspective on the origin of the discipline and an overview of the traditional and contemporary issues that chemical engineers address. Within this context, the course compares and contrasts the differing roles of chemical engineers and chemists in society. Additionally the course introduces the methodology chemical engineers use to solve problems, engineering ethics, and career options in chemical engineering.
1
CHME-182
Chemical Engineering Insights II
This course examines how chemical engineering analysis can be applied to address some of society’s current and future challenges. Particular attention is focused on the size and scale of a system and its affect on the engineering constraints and the ultimate solution of problems. The course enables students to recognize that the processes and equipment that chemical engineers design to solve local problems affect the broader problems that society faces, such as the supply of energy and preservation of the environment. The course demonstrates the power of the system balance as an essential tool for engineering analysis, and provides students with some elementary training in its use.
1
CHMG-141
General and Analytical Chemistry I
This is a general chemistry course for students in the life and physical sciences. College chemistry is presented as a science based on empirical evidence that is placed into the context of conceptual, visual, and mathematical models. Students will learn the concepts, symbolism, and fundamental tools of chemistry necessary to carry on a discourse in the language of chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between atomic structure, chemical bonds, and the transformation of these bonds through chemical reactions. The fundamentals of organic chemistry are introduced throughout the course to emphasize the connection between chemistry and the other sciences.
3
CHMG-145
General and Analytical Chemistry I Lab
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-141 lecture material. The course emphasizes laboratory techniques and data analysis skills. Topics include: gravimetric, volumetric, thermal, titration and spectrophotometric analyses, and the use of these techniques to analyze chemical reactions.
1
CHMG-142
General and Analytical Chemistry II
The course covers the thermodynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions. The relationship between energy and entropy change as the driving force of chemical processes is emphasized through the study of aqueous solutions. Specifically, the course takes a quantitative look at: 1) solubility equilibrium, 2) acid-base equilibrium, 3) oxidation-reduction reactions and 4) chemical kinetics.
3
CHMG-146
General and Analytical Chemistry II Lab
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-142 lecture material. The course emphasizes the use of experiments as a tool for chemical analysis and the reporting of results in formal lab reports. Topics include the quantitative analysis of a multicomponent mixture using complexation and double endpoint titration, pH measurement, buffers and pH indicators, the kinetic study of a redox reaction, and the electrochemical analysis of oxidation reduction reactions.
1
MATH-181
Project-based Calculus I
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals.
4
MATH-182
Project-based Calculus II
This is the second in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates.
4
PHYS-211
University Physics I
This is a course in calculus-based physics for science and engineering majors. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton's Laws, gravitation, work and energy, momentum and impulse, conservation laws, systems of particles, rotational motion, static equilibrium, mechanical oscillations and waves, and data presentation/analysis. The course is taught in a workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses.
4
ACSC-010
Year One
The Year One class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, personal success, leadership development, social responsibility and life academic skills awareness and application. Year One is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build relationships and help them become an integral part of the campus community.
0
 
First Year LAS Elective
3
 
First Year Writing 
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
CHME-230
Chemical Process Analysis
A first course for chemical engineers, introducing units, dimensions and dimensional analysis, simple material balances for batch and continuous systems in steady and unsteady states with and without chemical reaction, and elementary phase equilibrium in multiple component systems. Energy balances on non-reactive systems in open and closed systems are introduced.
3
CHMO-231
Organic Chemistry I
This course is a study of the structure, nomenclature, reactions and synthesis of the following functional groups: alkanes, alkenes, alkynes. This course also introduces chemical bonding, IR and NMR spectroscopy, acid and base reactions, stereochemistry, nucleophilic substitution reactions, and alkene and alkyne reactions. In addition, the course provides an introduction to the use of mechanisms in describing and predicting organic reactions.
3
CHMO-235
Organic Chemistry I Lab
This course trains students to perform techniques important in an organic chemistry lab. The course also covers reactions from the accompanying lecture CHMO-231.
1
MATH-231
Differential Equations
This course is an introduction to the study of ordinary differential equations and their applications. Topics include solutions to first order equations and linear second order equations, method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, linear independence and the Wronskian, vibrating systems, and Laplace transforms.
3
STAT-205
Applied Statistics
This course covers basic statistical concepts and techniques including descriptive statistics, probability, inference, and quality control. The statistical package Minitab will be used to reinforce these techniques. The focus of this course is on statistical applications and quality improvement in engineering. This course is intended for engineering programs and has a calculus prerequisite. Note: This course may not be taken for credit if credit is to be earned in STAT-145 or STAT-155 or MATH 252..
3
CHME-310
Applied Thermodynamics
This is a course in the fundamentals of both single and multiple-component thermodynamics. The first and second laws of thermodynamics and concepts of entropy and equilibrium are examined in open and closed control volume systems. Energy, work, and heat requirements of various unit operations are examined. Equations of states and properties of fluids are explored. Phase transition and equilibrium involving single-and multiple components are examined for both ideal and non-ideal systems. Energy released/absorbed during chemical reaction and solution creation are imbedded in analysis of chemical engineering processes
3
CHME-320
Continuum Mechanics I
Fundamentals of static and flowing fluids are examined on both large-scale (control volumes) and local differential scales. Forces on solids due to static and flowing fluids are determined. Head losses and pumping requirements are considered in piping systems. The art of engineering approximation is examined through estimates of forces due to flow on solids, as well as various limiting cases involving internal pipe flows with friction factors. Exact solutions of local differential equations of fluid mechanics are considered under both steady state and transient conditions, and these analyses are used to determine forces in control volume analysis of bodies. The important interplay between differential and control volume analyses in solving problems is emphasized.
3
CHME-391
Chemical Engineering Principles Lab
Students are introduced to basic equipment and methodologies for designing laboratory experiments, measuring results, interpreting data, and drawing objective conclusions. Students work in teams to design experimental procedures, identify lab equipment, and assemble simple apparatus to achieve specific experimental goals.
2
CHMI-351
Inorganic Chemistry I
This course covers descriptive inorganic reactions in terms of periodic trends. Topics will include nucleosynthesis and the birth of the universe, applications used in large-scale industrial processes and their environmental impacts, nanostructured materials, and bonding theory will also be discussed. A detailed study of solid-state chemistry and structure will also be addressed.
3
MATH-221
Multivariable and Vector Calculus
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes a study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, Stokes' Theorem, Green's Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-219.
4
EGEN-099
Engineering Co-op Preparation
This course will prepare students, who are entering their second year of study, for both the job search and employment in the field of engineering. Students will learn strategies for conducting a successful job search, including the preparation of resumes and cover letters; behavioral interviewing techniques and effective use of social media in the application process. Professional and ethical responsibilities during the job search and for co-op and subsequent professional experiences will be discussed.
0
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
Third Year
CHME-330
Mass Transfer Operations
This course covers the analysis and design of chemical processes for the separation and purification of mixtures. The course includes an introduction to the fundamentals of diffusion leading up to mass transfer coefficients and their use in solving a variety of engineering problems. Design methodologies are examined for equilibrium based processes (such as absorption, stripping, and distillation). Rate-based separation processes, including packed columns and batch adsorption, are examined and contrasted with equilibrium-based processes.
3
CHME-321
Continuum Mechanics II
This course is the continuation of Continuum Mechanics I, and focuses on fluid flow and heat transfer on a differential scale. Commonly-used approximations to the equations of fluid mechanics are considered, such as creeping, potential, and boundary layer flows. Scaling is introduced as a means of characterizing these regimes. General local differential equations and boundary conditions describing heat transfer are derived and solved in a variety of configurations. Simplifying approximations of conduction, convection, and radiation dominated heat transfer are introduced, and combined modes of transfer are analyzed. The performance of heat exchangers is analyzed for a variety of common configurations.
3
CHME-301
Analytical Techniques for Chemical Engineers I
Mathematical techniques necessary for engineering analysis are introduced that augment training from core mathematics and engineering courses. The spreadsheet environment is used to implement mathematical procedures and examine data results. Topics examined include roots of equations, curve fitting, statistics, Fourier analysis, solution of systems of algebraic equations, optimization, numerical differentiation and integration, and the solution of ordinary and partial differential equations. Techniques are applied to mathematical problems naturally arising in chemical engineering.
3
CHMA-231
Chemical Instrumental Analysis for Engineering
This course presents a preliminary treatment of instrumental theory and technique as well as hands on experience with modern chemical instrumentation. The course will cover the theory and implementation of spectroscopic, mass spectrometric, and chemical separations instrumentation and techniques. Instrumental techniques include: atomic and molecular emission and absorption and emission spectroscopies, atomic and molecular mass spectrometry, gas chromatography, and high performance liquid chromatography. Students will perform experiments utilizing modern chemical instrumentation and gain experience in analyzing data and presenting results experimental results.
3
 
Cooperative Education (fall)
Co-op
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
 
Free Elective
3
Fourth Year
CHME-350
Multiple Scale Material Science
This course gives students fundamental background in the atomic and molecular structures of engineering materials and how they can be manipulated. The physical and chemical foundations of the thermal, electrical and optical properties of engineering materials are studied. The effect of fabrication on structure/material properties is examined, as well as criteria to select appropriate materials for engineering applications. A summary of nanomaterial properties and the prevalent methods of synthesis will also be highlighted.
3
CHME-340
Reaction Engineering
The fundamentals of chemical kinetics are integrated with the concepts of mass and energy conservation, from both a macroscopic and microscopic perspective, to develop models that describe the performance of chemical reactors. Topics include mass action kinetics and absolute rate theory, series and parallel reaction systems, and the mathematical modeling of various reactor configurations. The conceptual framework and tools are developed to understand and design chemical reactor processes and to interpret experimental data obtained on a laboratory scale to design pilot scale and full scale manufacturing processes.
4
CHME-302
Analytical Techniques for Engineers II
This course introduces the student to more advanced mathematical and numerical methods necessary for engineering analysis. Mathematical problems naturally arising in chemical engineering are used to motivate the course topics and techniques taught. The MATLAB programming environment is utilized to facilitate computation, and students learn to use MATLAB’s inbuilt tools as well as Simulink.. Topics examined include the solution of systems of linear and nonlinear equations and the solution of ordinary and partial differential equations (initial and boundary value problems). Some important topics covered in CHME-301 are re-examined in the MATLAB environment, such as roots of equations, curve fitting, and numerical integration and differentiation
3
CHME-491
Chemical Engineering Processes Lab
This course extends the laboratory experience from the previous Chemical Engineering Principles Lab, and focuses on unit operations common to engineering practice. Students work in teams to design experimental procedures on existing equipment, and to in some cases, manipulate experimental apparatus to achieve specific experimental goals.
2
PUBL-701
Graduate Policy Analysis
This course provides graduate students with necessary tools to help them become effective policy analysts. The course places particular emphasis on understanding the policy process, the different approaches to policy analysis, and the application of quantitative and qualitative methods for evaluating public policies. Students will apply these tools to contemporary public policy decision making at the local, state, federal, and international levels.
3
PHYS-212
University Physics II
This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses.
4
PUBL-702
Graduate Decision Analysis
This course provides students with an introduction to decision science and analysis. The course focuses on several important tools for making good decisions, including decision trees, including forecasting, risk analysis, and multi-attribute decision making. Students will apply these tools to contemporary public policy decision making at the local, state, federal, and international levels.
3
STSO-710
Science and Technology Policy Seminar
Examines how federal and international policies are developed to influence research and development, innovation, and the transfer of technology in the United States and other selected nations. Students in the course will apply basic policy skills, concepts, and methods to contemporary science and technology policy topics.
3
 
LAS Immersion 1, 2
6
 
Professional/Technical Elective
3
Fifth Year
PUBL-703
Program Evaluation and Research Design
The focus of this course is on evaluation of program outcomes and research design. Students will explore the questions and methodologies associated with meeting programmatic outcomes, secondary or unanticipated effects, and an analysis of alternative means for achieving program outcomes. Critique of evaluation research methodologies will also be considered.
3
CHME-401
System Dynamics and Control
The dynamic behavior of chemical process components is examined. The mathematics of Laplace transforms are examined extensively as a fundamental underpinning of control theory. Block diagrams, feedback control systems, and stability analysis are introduced.
3
CHME-451
Analysis of Multi-Scale Processes
This course examines the use of larger scale chemical engineering processes to control and manipulate microscale phenomena.
3
CHME-492
Advanced Design Capstone
3
CHME-490
Design with Contraint
This course examines typical constraints on design and their integration with technology. Economics, environmental considerations, hazards analysis, ethics, and globalization and supply chain management ideas are among the concepts introduced. Modern examples that integrate knowledge of unit operations and processes with design constraints are examined.
3
PUBL-700
Readings in Public Policy
An in-depth inquiry into key contemporary public policy issues. Students will be exposed to a wide range of important public policy texts, and will learn how to write a literature review in a policy area of their choosing.
3
 
Public Policy Elective
3
 
LAS Immersion 3
3
 
Professional/Technical Electives or Public Policy Electives
6
Choose one of the following:
6
 
   Two Graduate Electives and Comprehensive Exam
 
  PUBL-799
   Thesis
 
Total Semester Credit Hours
150

Please see General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

(WI) Refers to a writing intensive course within the major.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Chemical engineering, BS degree/Materials science and engineering, MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CHME-181
Chemical Engineering Insights I
This is the first course of a two-course sequence that provides the foundation for success in the chemical engineering program at RIT and the field of chemical engineering. This course provides a historical perspective on the origin of the discipline and an overview of the traditional and contemporary issues that chemical engineers address. Within this context, the course compares and contrasts the differing roles of chemical engineers and chemists in society. Additionally the course introduces the methodology chemical engineers use to solve problems, engineering ethics, and career options in chemical engineering.
1
CHME-182
Chemical Engineering Insights II
This course examines how chemical engineering analysis can be applied to address some of society’s current and future challenges. Particular attention is focused on the size and scale of a system and its affect on the engineering constraints and the ultimate solution of problems. The course enables students to recognize that the processes and equipment that chemical engineers design to solve local problems affect the broader problems that society faces, such as the supply of energy and preservation of the environment. The course demonstrates the power of the system balance as an essential tool for engineering analysis, and provides students with some elementary training in its use.
1
CHMG-141
General and Analytical Chemistry I
This is a general chemistry course for students in the life and physical sciences. College chemistry is presented as a science based on empirical evidence that is placed into the context of conceptual, visual, and mathematical models. Students will learn the concepts, symbolism, and fundamental tools of chemistry necessary to carry on a discourse in the language of chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between atomic structure, chemical bonds, and the transformation of these bonds through chemical reactions. The fundamentals of organic chemistry are introduced throughout the course to emphasize the connection between chemistry and the other sciences.
3
CHMG-145
General and Analytical Chemistry I Lab
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-141 lecture material. The course emphasizes laboratory techniques and data analysis skills. Topics include: gravimetric, volumetric, thermal, titration and spectrophotometric analyses, and the use of these techniques to analyze chemical reactions.
1
CHMG-142
General and Analytical Chemistry II
The course covers the thermodynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions. The relationship between energy and entropy change as the driving force of chemical processes is emphasized through the study of aqueous solutions. Specifically, the course takes a quantitative look at: 1) solubility equilibrium, 2) acid-base equilibrium, 3) oxidation-reduction reactions and 4) chemical kinetics.
3
CHMG-146
General and Analytical Chemistry II Lab
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-142 lecture material. The course emphasizes the use of experiments as a tool for chemical analysis and the reporting of results in formal lab reports. Topics include the quantitative analysis of a multicomponent mixture using complexation and double endpoint titration, pH measurement, buffers and pH indicators, the kinetic study of a redox reaction, and the electrochemical analysis of oxidation reduction reactions.
1
MATH-181
Calculus I
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals.
4
MATH-182
Calculus II
This is the second in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates.
4
PHYS-211
University Physics I
This is a course in calculus-based physics for science and engineering majors. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton's Laws, gravitation, work and energy, momentum and impulse, conservation laws, systems of particles, rotational motion, static equilibrium, mechanical oscillations and waves, and data presentation/analysis. The course is taught in a workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses.
4
ACSC-010
Year One
The Year One class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, personal success, leadership development, social responsibility and life academic skills awareness and application. Year One is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build relationships and help them become an integral part of the campus community.
1
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
LAS Elective
3
 
First Year Writing 
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
Second Year
CHME-230
Chemical Process Analysis
A first course for chemical engineers, introducing units, dimensions and dimensional analysis, simple material balances for batch and continuous systems in steady and unsteady states with and without chemical reaction, and elementary phase equilibrium in multiple component systems. Energy balances on non-reactive systems in open and closed systems are introduced.
3
CHMO-231
Comprehensive Organic Chemistry I
This course is a study of the structure, nomenclature, reactions and synthesis of the following functional groups: alkanes, alkenes, alkynes. This course also introduces chemical bonding, IR and NMR spectroscopy, acid and base reactions, stereochemistry, nucleophilic substitution reactions, and alkene and alkyne reactions. In addition, the course provides an introduction to the use of mechanisms in describing and predicting organic reactions.
3
CHMO-235
Comprehensive Organic Chemistry I Lab
This course trains students to perform techniques important in an organic chemistry lab. The course also covers reactions from the accompanying lecture CHMO-231.
1
MATH-231
Differential Equations
This course is an introduction to the study of ordinary differential equations and their applications. Topics include solutions to first order equations and linear second order equations, method of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, linear independence and the Wronskian, vibrating systems, and Laplace transforms.
3
CHME-310
Applied Thermodynamics
This is a course in the fundamentals of both single and multiple-component thermodynamics. The first and second laws of thermodynamics and concepts of entropy and equilibrium are examined in open and closed control volume systems. Energy, work, and heat requirements of various unit operations are examined. Equations of states and properties of fluids are explored. Phase transition and equilibrium involving single-and multiple components are examined for both ideal and non-ideal systems. Energy released/absorbed during chemical reaction and solution creation are imbedded in analysis of chemical engineering processes
3
CHME-320
Continuum Mechanics I
Fundamentals of static and flowing fluids are examined on both large-scale (control volumes) and local differential scales. Forces on solids due to static and flowing fluids are determined. Head losses and pumping requirements are considered in piping systems. The art of engineering approximation is examined through estimates of forces due to flow on solids, as well as various limiting cases involving internal pipe flows with friction factors. Exact solutions of local differential equations of fluid mechanics are considered under both steady state and transient conditions, and these analyses are used to determine forces in control volume analysis of bodies. The important interplay between differential and control volume analyses in solving problems is emphasized.
3
CHME-391
Chemical Engineering Principles Lab
Students are introduced to basic equipment and methodologies for designing laboratory experiments, measuring results, interpreting data, and drawing objective conclusions. Students work in teams to design experimental procedures, identify lab equipment, and assemble simple apparatus to achieve specific experimental goals.
2
CHMI-351
Inorganic Chemistry I
This course covers descriptive inorganic reactions in terms of periodic trends. Topics will include nucleosynthesis and the birth of the universe, applications used in large-scale industrial processes and their environmental impacts, nanostructured materials, and bonding theory will also be discussed. A detailed study of solid-state chemistry and structure will also be addressed.
3
MATH-221
Multivariable and Vector Calculus
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes a study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, Stokes' Theorem, Green's Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-219.
4
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
 
Cooperative Education Preparation
0
 
Wellness Education
0
Third Year
 
Cooperative Education
co-op
CHME-330
Mass Transfer Operations
This course covers the analysis and design of chemical processes for the separation and purification of mixtures. The course includes an introduction to the fundamentals of diffusion leading up to mass transfer coefficients and their use in solving a variety of engineering problems. Design methodologies are examined for equilibrium based processes (such as absorption, stripping, and distillation). Rate-based separation processes, including packed columns and batch adsorption, are examined and contrasted with equilibrium-based processes.
3
CHME-321
Continuum Mechanics II
This course is the continuation of Continuum Mechanics I, and focuses on fluid flow and heat transfer on a differential scale. Commonly-used approximations to the equations of fluid mechanics are considered, such as creeping, potential, and boundary layer flows. Scaling is introduced as a means of characterizing these regimes. General local differential equations and boundary conditions describing heat transfer are derived and solved in a variety of configurations. Simplifying approximations of conduction, convection, and radiation dominated heat transfer are introduced, and combined modes of transfer are analyzed. The performance of heat exchangers is analyzed for a variety of common configurations.
3
CHME-301
Analytical Techniques for Chemical Engineers I
Mathematical techniques necessary for engineering analysis are introduced that augment training from core mathematics and engineering courses. The spreadsheet environment is used to implement mathematical procedures and examine data results. Topics examined include roots of equations, curve fitting, statistics, Fourier analysis, solution of systems of algebraic equations, optimization, numerical differentiation and integration, and the solution of ordinary and partial differential equations. Techniques are applied to mathematical problems naturally arising in chemical engineering.
3
CHMA-221
Instrumental Analysis
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
 
Free Elective
3
Fourth Year
CHME-350
Multiple Scale Material Science
This course gives students fundamental background in the atomic and molecular structures of engineering materials and how they can be manipulated. The physical and chemical foundations of the thermal, electrical and optical properties of engineering materials are studied. The effect of fabrication on structure/material properties is examined, as well as criteria to select appropriate materials for engineering applications. A summary of nanomaterial properties and the prevalent methods of synthesis will also be highlighted.
3
CHME-340
Reaction Engineering
The fundamentals of chemical kinetics are integrated with the concepts of mass and energy conservation, from both a macroscopic and microscopic perspective, to develop models that describe the performance of chemical reactors. Topics include mass action kinetics and absolute rate theory, series and parallel reaction systems, and the mathematical modeling of various reactor configurations. The conceptual framework and tools are developed to understand and design chemical reactor processes and to interpret experimental data obtained on a laboratory scale to design pilot scale and full scale manufacturing processes.
4
CHME-302
Analytical Tech. for Chemical Engineers II
This course introduces the student to more advanced mathematical and numerical methods necessary for engineering analysis. Mathematical problems naturally arising in chemical engineering are used to motivate the course topics and techniques taught. The MATLAB programming environment is utilized to facilitate computation, and students learn to use MATLAB’s inbuilt tools as well as Simulink.. Topics examined include the solution of systems of linear and nonlinear equations and the solution of ordinary and partial differential equations (initial and boundary value problems). Some important topics covered in CHME-301 are re-examined in the MATLAB environment, such as roots of equations, curve fitting, and numerical integration and differentiation
3
CHME-491
Chemical Engineering Process Lab
This course extends the laboratory experience from the previous Chemical Engineering Principles Lab, and focuses on unit operations common to engineering practice. Students work in teams to design experimental procedures on existing equipment, and to in some cases, manipulate experimental apparatus to achieve specific experimental goals.
2
MTSE-601
Introduction to Materials Science
This course provides an understanding of the relationship between structure and properties necessary for the development of new materials. Topics include atomic and crystal structure, crystalline defects, diffusion, theories, strengthening mechanisms, ferrous alloys, cast irons, structure of ceramics and polymeric materials and corrosion principles. Term paper on materials topic.
3
PHYS-211
University Physics II
This is a course in calculus-based physics for science and engineering majors. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton's Laws, gravitation, work and energy, momentum and impulse, conservation laws, systems of particles, rotational motion, static equilibrium, mechanical oscillations and waves, and data presentation/analysis. The course is taught in a workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses.
4
MTSE-704
Theoretical Methods in Materials Science and Engineering
This course includes the treatment of vector analysis, special functions, waves, and fields; Maxwell Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac distributions, and their applications. Selected topics of interest in electrodynamics, fluid mechanics, and statistical mechanics will also be discussed.
3
 
LAS Immersion 1
3
 
Professional Technical Electives (MSE)
6
 
Free Elective
3
Fifth Year
CHME-451
Analysis of Multi-scale Processes
This course examines the use of larger scale chemical engineering processes to control and manipulate microscale phenomena.
3
CHME-490
Design with Constraint
This course examines typical constraints on design and their integration with technology. Economics, environmental considerations, hazards analysis, ethics, and globalization and supply chain management ideas are among the concepts introduced. Modern examples that integrate knowledge of unit operations and processes with design constraints are examined.
3
CHME-401
System Dynamics and Control
The dynamic behavior of chemical process components is examined. The mathematics of Laplace transforms are examined extensively as a fundamental underpinning of control theory. Block diagrams, feedback control systems, and stability analysis are introduced.
3
MTSE-705
Theoretical Techniques
The course will introduce the students to laboratory equipment for hardness testing, impact testing, tensile testing, X-ray diffraction, SEM, and thermal treatment of metallic materials. Experiments illustrating the characterization of high molecular weight organic polymers will be performed.
3
CHME-492
Advanced Design Capstone
3
 
LAS Immersion 2, 3
6
 
Professional Technical Elective (MSE)
3
 
MTSE Elective
3
Choose one of the following:
9
  MTSE-790
   Research and Thesis
Dissertation research by the candidate for an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the research advisor.
 
  
   MTSE Electives
 
Total Semester Credit Hours
150

Please see General Education Curriculum–Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing bachelor's degrees are required to complete two different Wellness courses.

Additional Info

Freshman Admission

For all bachelor’s degree programs, a strong performance in a college preparatory program is expected. Generally, this includes 4 years of English, 3-4 years of mathematics, 2-3 years of science, and 3 years of social studies and/or history.

Specific math and science requirements and other recommendations

  • 4 years of math required; including pre-calculus or above  
  • Chemistry and physics required

Transfer Admission

Transfer course recommendations without associate degree

Pre-engineering courses such as calculus, calculus-based physics, chemistry, and liberal arts.

Appropriate associate degree programs for transfer

AS degree in engineering science