Materials Science and Engineering Master of science degree

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The materials science master's degree explores a fascinating area of study that contributes solutions to challenges facing fields as diverse as energy, medicine, clothing, and sporting equipment.


100%

Outcome Rate of RIT Graduates

$71.4K

Average First-Year Salary of RIT Graduates

30%

Merit scholarship

Average award given to accepted students

Overview

  • Recent materials science and engineering graduates are employed at Dow Chemical, Toyota, Lumisyn, 3M, Samsung Austin Semiconductor, NASA Glenn Research Center, Xerox, and The Gleason Works.
  • Unique, multidisciplinary program that combines collaborative experiences from the Kate Gleason College of Engineering, Golisano Institute of Sustainability, and housed within the College of Science.
  • Diverse faculty from the physical, chemical, and biological sciences, in addition to leaders in engineering.
  • Students develop skills that are in demand in many industries, including transportation, electronics, machinery, medical, consulting, utilities, education, government, and retail.

The materials science master's degree is designed to satisfy individual and industry needs in the rapidly growing field of materials. The materials science degree offers a serious interdisciplinary learning experience in materials studies, crossing over the traditional boundaries of such classical disciplines like chemistry, physics, and engineering.

The MS degree in materials science and engineering offered jointly by the College of Science and the Kate Gleason College of Engineering, is designed with a variety of options to satisfy individual and industry needs in the rapidly growing field of materials.

The objectives of the program are threefold:

  • With the advent of new classes of materials and instruments, the traditional practice of empiricism in the search for and selection of materials is rapidly becoming obsolete. Therefore, the program offers a serious interdisciplinary learning experience in materials studies, crossing over the traditional boundaries of such classical disciplines like chemistry, physics, and electrical, mechanical, and microelectronic engineering.
  • The program provides extensive experimental courses in diverse areas of materials-related studies.
  • The program explores avenues for introducing greater harmony between industrial expansion and academic training.

Plan of Study

The program includes three required core courses, graduate electives, and either a thesis or project. The core courses are specially designed to establish a common base of materials-oriented knowledge for students with baccalaureate degrees in chemistry, chemical engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, physics, and related disciplines, providing a new intellectual identity to those involved in the study of materials.

There also is an emphasis on experimental techniques, with one required experimental course as part of the curriculum. Additional experimental courses are available for students who wish to pursue course work in this area. These courses are organized into appropriate units covering many aspects of the analysis of materials. This aspect of the program enhances a student’s confidence when dealing with materials-related problems.

Electives

Elective courses may be selected from advanced courses offered by the School of Chemistry and Materials Science or, upon approval, from courses offered by other RIT graduate programs. Elective courses are scheduled on a periodic basis. Transfer credit may be awarded based on academic background beyond the bachelor’s degree or by examination, based on experience.

Thesis/Project

Students may choose to complete a thesis or a project as the conclusion to their program. Students who pursue the thesis option take four graduate electives, complete nine credit hours of research, and produce a thesis paper. The project option includes six graduate electives and a 3 credit hour project.

Part-Time Study

The materials science degree offers courses in the late afternoon and evenings to encourage practicing scientists and engineers to pursue the program without interrupting their employment. (This may not apply to courses offered off campus at selected industrial sites.) Students employed full time are normally limited to a maximum of two courses, or 6 credit hours, each semester. A student who wishes to register for more than 6 credit hours must obtain the permission of his or her advisor.

National Labs Career Fair

Hosted by RIT’s Office of Career Services and Cooperative Education, the National Labs Career Fair is an annual event that brings representatives to campus from the United States’ federally funded research and development labs. These national labs focus on scientific discovery, clean energy development, national security, technology advancements, and more. Students are invited to attend the career fair to network with lab professionals, learn about opportunities, and interview for co-ops, internships, research positions, and full-time employment.

Typical Job Titles

Application Engineer Chemical Technician
Design for Value Engineer Manufacture Process Engineer
Material Engineering Development Optimized Operations Engineer
Process Engineer Process Technical Development Engineer
Research Associate Validation Engineer

Featured Work

Curriculum for Materials Science and Engineering MS

Materials Science and Engineering (thesis option), MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MTSE-601
Materials Science
This course provides an understanding of the relationship between structure and properties necessary for the development of new materials. Topics include atomic and crystal structure, crystalline defects, diffusion, theories, strengthening mechanisms, ferrous alloys, cast irons, structure of ceramics and polymeric materials and corrosion principles. Term paper on materials topic. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MTSE-704
Theoretical Methods in Materials Science and Engineering
This course includes the treatment of vector analysis, special functions, waves, and fields; Maxwell Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac distributions, and their applications. Selected topics of interest in electrodynamics, fluid mechanics, and statistical mechanics will also be discussed. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MTSE-705
Experimental Techniques
The course will introduce the students to laboratory equipment for hardness testing, impact testing, tensile testing, X-ray diffraction, SEM, and thermal treatment of metallic materials. Experiments illustrating the characterization of high molecular weight organic polymers will be performed. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lab 3 (Spring).
3
MTSE-790
Research & Thesis
Dissertation research by the candidate for an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the research advisor. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Thesis (Fall, Spring, Summer).
6
 
Graduate Electives
12
Second Year
MTSE-790
Research & Thesis
Dissertation research by the candidate for an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the research advisor. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Thesis (Fall, Spring, Summer).
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
30

Materials Science and Engineering (project option), MS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MTSE-601
Materials Science
This course provides an understanding of the relationship between structure and properties necessary for the development of new materials. Topics include atomic and crystal structure, crystalline defects, diffusion, theories, strengthening mechanisms, ferrous alloys, cast irons, structure of ceramics and polymeric materials and corrosion principles. Term paper on materials topic. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MTSE-704
Theoretical Methods in Materials Science and Engineering
This course includes the treatment of vector analysis, special functions, waves, and fields; Maxwell Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac distributions, and their applications. Selected topics of interest in electrodynamics, fluid mechanics, and statistical mechanics will also be discussed. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
MTSE-705
Experimental Techniques
The course will introduce the students to laboratory equipment for hardness testing, impact testing, tensile testing, X-ray diffraction, SEM, and thermal treatment of metallic materials. Experiments illustrating the characterization of high molecular weight organic polymers will be performed. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lab 3 (Spring).
3
MTSE-777
Graduate Project
This course is a capstone project using research facilities available inside or outside of RIT. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Project .
3
 
Graduate Electives
15
Second Year
 
Graduate Elective
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
30

Electives

Course
CHMA-621
Advanced Instrumental Analysis Lab
This is a capstone course requiring students to develop experimental protocols involving advanced techniques in instrumental analysis. This course is intended to give an opportunity to develop innovative skills and writing proficiency. Library, literature and textbook research will be required. (Prerequisites: CHMB-405 or CHMP-445 or Graduate Standing in CHEM-MS.) Lab 6 (Spring).
CHMA-711
Advanced Instrumental Analysis
The theory, applications, and limitations of selected instrumental methods in qualitative, quantitative and structural analysis will be discussed. This course is also intended to give an opportunity to develop writing and revising abilities, as well as communication skills. Library, literature, and textbook research will be required. (Prerequisites: CHMA-221 and CHMP-441 or equivalent courses or graduate standing in CHEM-MS.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
CHMB-610
Advanced Protein Biochemistry: Structure and Function
This course analyzes protein structure function relationships. Students will investigate how proteins function and how the structure relates to that function. The principles that explain enzyme rate enhancements and mechanistic enzymology will be examined. Additionally, protein superfamilies for phylogenetic relationships will be explored to enhance understanding of protein structure-function relationships. Students will read and discuss the current scientific literature and classic papers. (Prerequisites: CHMB-402 or equivalent course or degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
CHMB-702
Protein Conformation and Dynamics
An advanced study of the structure and function of proteins and enzymes. Biophysical and mechanistic aspects of enzyme function will be examined. Applications of computation to protein structure will also be discussed. (Prerequisites: CHMB-402 or equivalent course or degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
CHMI-664
Modern Inorganic Chemistry
This course will apply molecular structure and bonding theory to explain inorganic coordinate complex structure and function, and coordination reaction chemistry. The topics discussed in this course are molecular structure, symmetry, bonding theory, d-block electronic structure and properties, and the reaction mechanisms controlling coordinate complexes. Students will be expected to translate the concepts learned in class to solving analytical and structural analysis problems inorganic systems. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
CHMO-636
Spectrometric Identification of Organic Compounds
This course covers the theory and application of proton, carbon-13, and correlation nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, and mass spectrometry for organic structure determination. (Prerequisites: CHMO-332 with a grade of C- or better or equivalent course or Graduate Standing in CHEM-MS.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
CHMO-739
Advanced Physical Organic Chemistry
This course covers topics in physical organic chemistry including: techniques for elucidation of mechanism (kinetic, and linear free energy relationships); isotope effects; molecular orbital theory; and electrocyclic reactions. (Prerequisites: CHMO-332 and CHMP-441 or equivalent course or Graduate Standing in CHEM-MS.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
CHMP-753
Computational Chemistry
This course will introduce students to an in-depth investigation into the computational theories and applications used to model complex physical and chemical phenomena. Computational methods are used to provide synergy linking experiment with theory involving such chemical processes as reaction mechanisms, docking, energy transfer and conformational conversions. Predicting spectral and thermodynamic properties of molecular systems and ensembles will also be treated. (Prerequisites: CHMP-442 or equivalent course or Graduate Standing in CHEM-MS.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
CHPO-706
Polymer Synthesis
Comprehensive Polymer Chemistry is an in depth survey of contemporary chemistry involved in the synthesis of high molecular weight polymers and macromolecules and the relationships between their structure, functionality and applications. The course is focused on organic chemistry of polymers and macromolecules and the fundamental principles that govern chain structure and statistics, solution behavior, characterization of polymers, and swollen gels and soft matter. Specific attention is given to recent advances and current issues in the synthesis of polymer of controlled architecture and self-assembly of polymers and macromolecules. (Prerequisites: CHMO-332 and CHMP-441 or equivalent course or Graduate Standing in CHEM-MS.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
CHPO-707
Polymer Chemistry II
This course further investigates the contemporary chemistry of high molecular weight polymers and macromolecules and the relationships between their structure, functionality, and utility. The course focuses on fundamental principles that govern swollen gels and soft matter. Mechanisms of the formation of polymers containing heteroatoms in their chains are examined in detail. Specific attention is given to the synthesis of polymers of controlled architecture and self-assembly, and of polymers and macromolecules. Dendrimers, hyper-branched polymers, functional polymers, polymeric reagents, polyelectrolytes, and biopolymers are also discussed. (Prerequisites: CHPO-706 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
CHPO-708
Polymer Synthesis & Characterization Lab
Students will synthesize about eight polymers and characterize them carry by specific methods. In about half of those experiments step-growth polymerizations and in the other half chain-addition polymerizations will be performed. Among the polymers produced will be Nylon 6-10, Nylon 11, polystyrene, high-density polyethylene, linear low density polyethylene, copolymer of styrene and methyl methacrylate and polyurethane. The most specific types of polymerizations and reactions introduced will be cross-linking polymer, interfacial and bulk step-growth polymerizations, cyclopolymerization, radical, ionic and coordinative chain polymerizations. The methods of characterization which will be applied are infrared (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, titrations, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), measurement of swelling, and viscometry. (Prerequisites: CHMO-336 or equivalent course or Graduate Standing in CHEM-MS.) Lab 8 (Fall).
EEEE-605
Modern Optics for Engineers
This course provides a broad overview of modern optics in preparation for more advanced courses in the rapidly developing fields of optical fiber communications, image processing, super-resolution imaging, optical properties of materials, and novel optical materials. Topics covered: geometrical optics, propagation of light, diffraction, interferometry, Fourier optics, optical properties of materials, polarization and liquid crystals, and fiber optics. In all topics, light will be viewed as signals that carry information (data) in the time or spatial domain. After taking this course, the students should have a firm foundation in classical optics. (Prerequisite: EEEE-374 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
EEEE-689
Fundamentals of MEMS
Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are widely used in aerospace, automotive, biotechnology, instrumentation, robotics, manufacturing, and other applications. There is a critical need to synthesize and design high performance MEMS which satisfy the requirements and specifications imposed. Integrated approaches must be applied to design and optimized MEMS, which integrate microelectromechanical motion devices, ICs, and microsensors. This course covers synthesis, design, modeling, simulation, analysis, control and fabrication of MEMS. Synthesis, design and analysis of MEMS will be covered including CAD. (Prerequisites: This course is restricted to graduate students in the EEEE-MS, EEEE-BS/MS program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
EEEE-713
Solid State Physics
An advanced-level course on solid-state physics, with particular emphasis on the electronic properties of semiconductor materials. Topics include crystal structure, wave propagation in crystalline solids, lattice vibrations, elements of quantum mechanics, elements of statistical mechanics, free-electron theory of metals, Boltzmann transport equation, quantum-mechanical theory of carriers in crystals, energy band theory, equilibrium carrier statistics, excess carriers in semiconductors, carrier transport. (Prerequisites: This course is restricted to graduate students in the EEEE-MS, EEEE-BS/MS program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
EEEE-730
Advanced Analog IC Design
This is the second course in the graduate course sequence in analog integrated circuit design EEEE-726 and EEEE-730. This course covers the following topics: (1) Fundamentals of Filter Design (2) Filter Approximations (3) Frequency and Impedance Scaling (4) Delay Equalization (5) Sensitivity Analysis (6) Sampled Data Theory (7) CMOS Integrated Filters including Switched Capacitor and gm-C Filters (8)Phase Locked Loops (Prerequisites: EEEE-726 or equivalent course.) Lecture 4 (Fall).
EEEE-787
MEMS Evaluation
This course focuses on evaluation of MEMS, microsystems and microelectromechanical motion devices utilizing MEMS testing and characterization. Evaluations are performed using performance evaluation matrices, comprehensive performance analysis and functionality. Applications of advanced software and hardware in MEMS evaluation will be covered. (Prerequisites: This course is restricted to graduate students in the EEEE-MS, EEEE-BS/MS program.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
IMGS-616
Fourier Methods for Imaging
This course develops the mathematical methods required to describe continuous and discrete linear systems, with special emphasis on tasks required in the analysis or synthesis of imaging systems. The classification of systems as linear/nonlinear and shift variant/invariant, development and use of the convolution integral, Fourier methods as applied to the analysis of linear systems. The physical meaning and interpretation of transform methods are emphasized. (This class is restricted to graduate students in the IMGS-MS or IMGS-PHD programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
IMGS-724
Introduction to Electron Microscopy
The course will introduce the basic concepts and practice of electron microscopy, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray microanalysis. During the second half of the course students will do an 8-10 hour hands-on project in SEM or TEM or both, including a project paper and a poster presentation. Laboratory demonstrations will be held in the NanoImaging Lab to reinforce the lecture material. (This course is restricted to students with graduate standing in the College of Science or the Kate Gleason College of Engineering.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
IMGS-737
Physical Optics
This course covers the wave properties of light, its interaction with matter, and the application of these principles to imaging systems. Topics include polarization of light, birefringence, interference and interferometers, spatial and temporal coherence, and scalar diffraction theory. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Spring).
ISEE-682
Lean Six Sigma Fundamentals
This course presents the philosophy and methods that enable participants to develop quality strategies and drive process improvements. The fundamental elements of Lean Six Sigma are covered along with many problem solving and statistical tools that are valuable in driving process improvements in a broad range of business environments and industries. Successful completion of this course is accompanied by “yellow belt” certification and provides a solid foundation for those who also wish to pursue a “green belt.” (Green belt certification requires completion of an approved project which is beyond the scope of this course). (This course is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students and dual degree BS/MS or BS/ME students in KGCOE.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
ISEE-741
3D Printing
This course begins with an introduction to commercial rapid prototyping processes, the materials involved, and the physics behind how they work. The course then transitions to research topics involving novel processes, applications, and materials. Class activities include a mix of lecture, lab, and project work. (Prerequisites: ISEE-140 or MECE-104 or MECE-304 or MECE-305 or equivalent course or graduate standing in ISEE-MS, ISEE-ME, SUSTAIN-MS, SUSTAIN-ME, ENGMGT-ME, MECE-MS or MECE-ME program.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Fall, Spring).
ISEE-771
Engineering of Systems I
The engineering of a system is focused on the identification of value and the value chain, requirements management and engineering, understanding the limitations of current systems, the development of the overall concept, and continually improving the robustness of the defined solution. EOS I & II is a 2-semester course sequence focused on the creation of systems that generate value for both the customer and the enterprise. Through systematic analysis and synthesis methods, novel solutions to problems are proposed and selected. This first course in the sequence focuses on the definition of the system requirements by systematic analysis of the existing problems, issues and solutions, to create an improved vision for a new system. Based on this new vision, new high-level solutions will be identified and selected for (hypothetical) further development. The focus is to learn systems engineering through a focus on an actual artifact (This course is restricted to students in the ISEE BS/MS, ISEE BS/ME, ISEE-MS, ISEE-ME, SUSTAIN-MS, SUSTAIN-ME, PRODEV-MS, MFLEAD-MS or ENGMGT-ME programs or those with 5th year standing in ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
ISEE-785
Fundamentals of Sustainable Engineering
This is a high level survey course that reviews the product lifecycle from various perspectives and highlights the leverage over material, process, and environmental impacts available at the design phase. Tools and strategies for reducing the environmental impacts associated with the sourcing, manufacture, use, and retirement of products will be reviewed and evaluated. (This course is restricted to students in ISEE-MS, ISEE-ME, SUSTAIN-MS, SUSTAIN-ME, ENGMGT-ME, MECE-MS, MECE-ME, SUSPRD-MN or those with at least 4th year standing in ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
ISEE-786
Lifecycle Assessment
This course introduces students to the challenges posed when trying to determine the total lifecycle impacts associated with a product or a process design. Various costing models and their inherent assumptions will be reviewed and critiqued. The inability of traditional costing models to account for important environmental and social externalities will be highlighted. The Lifecycle Assessment approach for quantifying environmental and social externalities will be reviewed and specific LCA techniques (Streamlined Lifecycle Assessment, SimaPro) will be covered. (This course is restricted to students in ISEE-MS, ISEE-ME, SUSTAIN-MS, SUSTAIN-ME, ENGMGT-ME, MECE-MS, MECE-ME, SUSPRD-MN or those with at least 4th year standing in ISEE-BS or ISEEDU-BS.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
ISEE-787
Design for the Environment
This course will provide the student with systematic approaches for designing and developing environmentally responsible products. In particular, design trade-offs will be explored. (Prerequisites: ISEE-140 or MECE-304 or MECE-305 or students in SUSPRD-MN or ISEE-MS or ISEE-ME or SUSTAIN-MS or SUSTAIN-ME or ENGMGT-ME or MECE-MS or MECE-ME programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
ISUS-718
Sustainable Energy Systems
Energy will play an increasingly vital role in economic, environmental and political developments around the world. This course first investigates the current trends in energy production, distribution, and consumption associated with the primary incumbent energy system technologies: fossil fuel combustion and nuclear power. An understanding of the economic, environmental and social limitations of these technologies will lead to analysis of the potential benefits of 3 key renewable technologies: solar (including wind), biomass and hydrogen/fuel cells. Potential paths to market penetration for these technologies will be introduced, including geographical variations expected to occur globally and within the United States. Lecture 3 (Fall).
ISUS-810
Thermodynamics for Sustainability
As energy plays a fundamental role in the system sustainability framework, it is essential that students and practitioners have an understanding of the laws of thermodynamics which govern the processes of energy usage and conversion. This course investigates the differences between energy and exergy analysis, where the latter includes not only the quantities of energy exchanged, but also the quality of the energy relative to some reference state. After establishing the fundamentals of exergy analysis, this concept is applied to practical sustainability problems associated with sustainable development, industrial systems and energy policy. Specific examples are also explored, including thermal storage and fuel cell systems, and life cycle assessment. Lecture 3 (Spring).
ISUS-821
Applied Life Cycle Assessment
Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a tool used in the field of industrial ecology to evaluate the environmental impacts of products or processes over their entire life cycle – from raw material extraction, manufacturing, use, and end-of-life management. This course will build on fundamental principles of LCA by allowing students to conduct project-based studies on the application of LCA to real-world sustainability issues. Students will apply process, economic input-output, and hybrid methodologies to evaluate technological systems for opportunities of environmental improvement. Lecture 3 (Spring).
ISUS-822
Materials Cycling
This class will explore the economic and environmental incentives for recycling and resource recovery. The focus will be on end-of-life fate of materials (including plastics, metals, glass, and e-waste) while setting these within the context of overall ecosystem flows (carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen cycles, waste water, etc.). Technologies for the upgrading of secondary material streams will be studied including: physical and physico-chemical (beneficiation, electrostatic and magnetic separation), hydrometallurgical (selective precipitation, leaching, ion exchange), biotechnological (biosorption, sulfate reduction),and pyrometallurgical (filtration and fluxing). Production issues (product quality, remelt thermodynamics, exergy accounting, etc.) within the secondary industry will be explored with an emphasis on removing barriers to increased usage of scrap. Efforts for enhanced collection efforts and motivation of consumer and firm participation will also be covered (municipal collection fees, corporate take-back initiatives, legislation such as the WEEE directive, state deposits, etc.) Lab 3 (Fall).
MCEE-601
Microelectronic Fabrication
This course introduces the beginning graduate student to the fabrication of solid-state devices and integrated circuits. The course presents an introduction to basic electronic components and devices, lay outs, unit processes common to all IC technologies such as substrate preparation, oxidation, diffusion and ion implantation. The course will focus on basic silicon processing. The students will be introduced to process modeling using a simulation tool such as SUPREM. The lab consists of conducting a basic metal gate PMOS process in the RIT clean room facility to fabricate and test a PMOS integrated circuit test ship. Laboratory work also provides an introduction to basic IC fabrication processes and safety. (Prerequisites: Graduate standing in the MCEE-MS or MCEMANU-ME program or permission of instructor.) Lab 3, Lecture 3 (Fall).
MCEE-603
Thin Films
This course focuses on the deposition and etching of thin films of conductive and insulating materials for IC fabrication. A thorough overview of vacuum technology is presented to familiarize the student with the challenges of creating and operating in a controlled environment. Physical and Chemical Vapor Deposition (PVD & CVD) are discussed as methods of film deposition. Plasma etching and Chemical Mechanical Planarization (CMP) are studied as methods for selective removal of materials. Applications of these fundamental thin film processes to IC manufacturing are presented. Graduate paper required. (Prerequisites: Graduate standing in the MCEE-MS or MCEMANU-ME program or permission of instructor.) Lab 3, Lecture 2 (Fall).
MCEE-605
Lithography Materials and Processes
Microlithography Materials and Processes covers the chemical aspects of microlithography and resist processes. Fundamentals of polymer technology will be addressed and the chemistry of various resist platforms including novolac, styrene, and acrylate systems will be covered. Double patterning materials will also be studied. Topics include the principles of photoresist materials, including polymer synthesis, photochemistry, processing technologies and methods of process optimization. Also advanced lithographic techniques and materials, including multi-layer techniques for BARC, double patterning, TARC, and next generation materials and processes are applied to optical lithography. Graduate paper required. (Prerequisites: Graduate standing in the MCEE-MS or MCEMANU-ME program or permission of instructor.) Lab 3, Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
MCEE-620
Photovoltaic Science and Engineering
This course focuses on the principle and engineering fundamentals of photovoltaic (PV) energy conversion. The course covers modern silicon PV devices, including the basic physics, ideal and non-ideal models, device parameters and design, and device fabrication. The course discusses crystalline, multi-crystalline, amorphous thin films solar cells and their manufacturing. Students will become familiar with basic semiconductor processes and how they are employed in solar cells manufacturing. The course further introduces third generation advanced photovoltaic concepts including compound semiconductors, spectral conversion, and organic and polymeric devices. PV applications, environmental, sustainability and economic issues will also be discussed. Evaluations include assignments and exams, a research/term paper on a current PV topic. (This course requires permission of the Instructor to enroll.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
MCEE-704
Physical Modeling of Semiconductor Devices
A senior or graduate level course on the application of simulation tools for physical design and verification of the operation of semiconductor devices. The goal of the course is to provide a more in-depth understanding of device physics through the use of simulation tools. Technology CAD tools include Silvaco (Athena/Atlas) for device simulation. The lecture will explore the various models that are used for device simulation, emphasizing the importance of complex interactions and 2-D effects as devices are scaled deep-submicron. Laboratory work involves the simulation of various device structures. Investigations will explore how changes in the device structure can influence device operation. (This course requires permission of the Instructor to enroll.) Lab 3, Lecture 3 (Fall).
MCEE-706
SiGe and SOI Devices and Technologies
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of III-V, SiGe and Silicon on Insulator (SOI) devices and fabrication technologies. The course will first discuss the band structure of the SiGe material system, and how its properties of band structure and enhanced mobility may be utilized to improve traditional Si devices. Basic heterojunciton theory is introduced to students. Some specific applications that are introduced include heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs), SiGe-channel MOS devices, high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) and tunnel FETs. Fabrication technologies for realizing SOI substrates that include SIMOX and SMART CUT technologies are described. The physics of transistors built on SOI substrates will be discussed. At the completion of the course, students will write a review paper on a topic related to the course. (This course requires permission of the Instructor to enroll.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
MCEE-714
Micro/Nano Characterization
MCEE-730
Metrology for Failure Analysis and Yield of ICs
Successful IC manufacturing must detect defects (the non-idealities) that occur in a process), eliminate those defects that preclude functional devices (yield enhancement), and functionality for up to ten years of use in the field (reliability). Course surveys current CMOS manufacturing to compile a list of critical parameters and steps to monitor during manufacturing. This survey is followed with an in depth look at the theory and instrumentation of the tools utilized to monitor these parameters. Tool set includes optical instrumentation, electron microscopy, surface analysis techniques, and electrical measurements. Case studies from industry and prior students are reviewed. Students are required to perform a project either exploring a technique not covered in class, or to apply their course knowledge to a practical problem. (Prerequisites: MCEE-201 or MCEE-360 or graduate student standing in the MCEE-MS program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
MCEE-770
Microelectromechanical Systems
This course will provide an opportunity for the student to become familiar with the design, fabrication technology and applications of Microelectromechanical systems. This is one of the fastest growing areas in the semiconductor business. Today's MEMS devices include accelerometers, pressure sensors, flow sensors, chemical sensors, energy harvesting and more. These devices have wide variety of applications including automotive, consumer, military, scientific, and biomedical. Students will select a MEMS device/project to be made and then design, fabricate, test, prepare a project presentation and final paper. (Prerequisites: MCEE-601 and EEEE-587 or EEEE-787 or equivalent courses.) Lab 2, Lecture 2 (Fall).
MCSE-610
Applied Biofluid Mechanics and Microcirculation
This is a one-semester introductory graduate course that introduces and develops fundamental understanding of the flow dynamics of blood. The course includes a discussion of basic fluid mechanics, blood rheology, and biological regulation of blood flow. Emphasis will be placed on developing a physical understanding of each of the fundamental ideas and how it is applied to microcirculation and cutting-edge biomedical research. Applications of state-of-art micro/nanotechnologies such as microfluidics in the study of microcirculation, tissue engineering, and blood diagnostic will be also discussed in the class. The course is also open to undergraduate students who have taken courses in fluid dynamics, e.g., MECE (210)-Fluid Mechanics I, BIME (320)- Fluid Mechanics or equivalent, and are interested in blood flow and related biomedical engineering technologies. Lecture 3 (Fall).
MCSE-712
Nonlinear Optics
This course introduces nonlinear concepts applied to the field of optics. Students learn how materials respond to high intensity electric fields and how the materials response: enables the generation of other frequencies, can focus light to the point of breakdown or create waves that do not disperse in time or space solitons, and how atoms can be cooled to absolute zero using a(laser. Students will be exposed to many applications of nonlinear concepts and to some current research subjects, especially at the nanoscale. Students will also observe several nonlinear-optical experiments in a state-of-the-art photonics laboratory. (Prerequisites: EEEE-374 or equivalent course or graduate student standing in the MCSE-PHD program.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
MCSE-713
Lasers
This course introduces students to the design, operation and (applications of lasers (Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of (Radiation). Topics: Ray tracing, Gaussian beams, Optical cavities, (Atomic radiation, Laser oscillation and amplification, Mode locking and Q switching, and Applications of lasers. (Prerequisites: EEEE-374 or equivalent course or graduate student standing in the MCSE-PHD program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
MCSE-731
Integrated Optical Devices & Systems
This course discusses basic goals, principles and techniques of integrated optical devices and systems, and explains how the various optoelectronic devices of an integrated optical system operate and how they are integrated into a system. Emphasis in this course will be on planar passive optical devices. Topics include optical waveguides, optical couplers, micro-optical resonators, surface plasmons, photonic crystals, modulators, design tools and fabrication techniques, and the applications of optical integrated circuits. Some of the current state-of-the-art devices and systems will be investigated by reference to journal articles. Lecture 3 (Fall).
MCSE-771
Optoelectronics
To provide an introduction to the operating principles of optoelectronic devices used in various current and future information processing and transmission systems. Emphasis in this course will be on the active optoelectronic devices used in optical fiber communication systems. Topics include pulse propagation in dispersive media, polarization devices, optical fiber, quantum states of light, fundamental of lasers, semiconductor optics, light-emitting diodes, laser diodes, semiconductor photon detectors, optical modulators, quantum wells, and optical fiber communication systems. (Prerequisite: This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students, 4th or 5th year status or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
MECE-644
Introduction To Composite Materials
This course is an introductory course to the fundamentals and applications of composite materials. Topics covered include constituents of composite materials, fabrication techniques, micromechanical analysis, macromechanical analysis, and the use of composites in design. Some laboratory work is to be performed, and a design project is required. (Prerequisites: MECE-203 and MECE-305 or equivalent courses or graduate student standing in MECE-MS or MECE-ME.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
MECE-657
Applied Biomaterials
This course provides an overview of materials used in biomedical applications. Topics covered include structure and properties of hard and soft biomaterials, material selection for medical applications, material performance and degradation in hostile environments, and typical and abnormal physiological responses to biomaterials/environments. Some experiments will be performed in class and a major project is required. (Prerequisites: (MECE-305 or BIME-370) and (MECE-210 or BIME-320) or equivalent courses and restricted to students in the MECE-BS, BIME-BS, MECE-ME or MECE-MS programs.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
MECE-739
Alternative Fuels and Energy Efficiency
This course provides an overview of the potential alternative fuels and energy efficiency technologies for powering current and future vehicles. Alternative fuel production technologies and utilization of fuels such as biodiesel, ethanol, and hydrogen will be covered. The primary technical and environmental issues associated with these alternative fuels will be discussed. Approaches to improving vehicle efficiency will also be explored. Students will be responsible for a final design or research project. (Prerequisites: MECE-352 or equivalent course or graduate standing in the MECE-MS or MECE-ME program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
MECE-746
Engineering Properties of Materials
This course presents the principles behind various properties of materials from an atomic and molecular perspective. Topics from physical chemistry and solid state physics and engineering are covered. Topics include: crystallography, thermodynamics of condensed phases, and thermal, elastic, electrical and magnetic properties. This course is oriented for advance undergraduate and graduate students with previous knowledge of materials science. (Prerequisites: MECE-305 or equivalent course or graduate standing in MECE-MS or MECE-ME program.) Lecture 4 (Fall).
MECE-752
Tribology Fundamentals
This course provides an overview of the role of fluid-film lubrication in mechanical design, with strong emphasis on applications. Various forms of the Reynolds equation governing the behavior of lubricant films for planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometry are derived. Mobility and impedance concepts as solution methods of the Reynolds equation are introduced for the performance assessment of lubricated journal bearings under static and dynamic loading. Short, long, and finite bearing assumptions are discussed. Finite element methods for the analysis of fluid-film bearings of arbitrary geometry will be introduced. (Prerequisites: MECE-203 and MECE-210 and MECE-317 or equivalent courses or graduate standing in the MECE-MS or MECE-ME program.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
MECE-754
Fundamentals of Fatigue and Fracture
This course is an introduction to the fatigue life prediction methodologies and basic fracture mechanics. Students will be introduced to linear elastic fracture mechanics, including stress intensity factor and crack tip plastic zone models. The fatigue methodologies to be covered include the Stress-Life Theory (used for machine elements), Strain-Life Theory (used for large-displacement samples and low cycle fatigue problems), and a fracture mechanics approach to fatigue analysis (used in the aircraft and space industries). (Prerequisites: MECE-317 and MECE-350 or equivalent courses or graduate standing in the MECE-MS or MECE-ME program.) Lecture 4 .
MECE-785
Mechanics of Solids
This course provides a more advanced treatment of stress and strain concepts pertaining to the mechanics of deformable media and provides a theoretical foundation for a concurrent or follow-on course in finite elements. Topics include stress and strain transformations, two-dimensional theory of elasticity, stress functions, torsion, plate bending, and energy methods. (Prerequisites: MECE-350 or graduate standing in MECE-ME or MECE-MS program.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
MECE-789
Graduate Special Topics
Topics and subject areas that are not regularly offered are provided under this course. Such courses are offered in a normal format; that is, regularly scheduled class sessions with an instructor. (This course is restricted to students in an MECE-BS/MS program or MECE-MS or MECE-ME.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
MFET-655
Surface Mount Electronics Manufacturing
This course provides a thorough understanding of the technology, components, equipment, materials and manufacturing process for through hole technology and surface mount technology electronics manufacturing. Students will develop a strong foundation needed for advanced work in surface mount technology (SMT). The activities will provide the students an orientation and familiarization of the manufacturing equipment and process parameters for printed circuit board assembly. Graduate students will explore surface defects and remediation and will prepare a detailed annotated bibliography related to specific aspects of electronics manufacturing. Topics in Design for Manufacturing are also considered for high volume vs. low volume manufacturing. Students may only receive credit for this course or MFET-545, not both. (This course is restricted to graduate or BS/MS students in the MMSI-MS or at least 3rd year standing in EMET-BS/MS, MCET-BS/MS, MFET-BS/MS programs. Students cannot take and receive credit for this course if they have taken MFET-545.) Lecture 3, Recitation 1 (Fall).
MFET-656
Advanced Concepts in Semiconductor Packaging
The advanced course in semiconductor packaging will provide a thorough coverage of the materials, processes, failure, and reliability of chip level packaging. Specific topics include single-chip, multi-chip, wafer level and 3D stacked packaging, photonic integrated chip (PIC), smaller passives and embedded passive component technology, advanced substrates and microvia technology, solder technologies, metallurgy and joint formation, thermal management, thermal and mechanical behavior of packaging, failure analysis, and reliability testing. Course includes projects and literature review in topics of semiconductor packaging. This course is cross listed with MFET-556 students may receive credit for MFET-556 or MFET-656, not both. (Prerequisites: MFET-655 or equivalent course. Students cannot take and receive credit for this course if they have taken MFET-556.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
MTSE-602
Polymer Science
MTSE-617
Material Degradation
This course introduces the basic electrochemical nature of corrosion and considers the various factors that influence the rate of corrosion in a variety of environments. Various means of controlling corrosion are considered with demonstrations. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
MTSE-632
Solid State Science
This course is an introduction to the physics of the solid state including crystal structure, x-ray diffraction by crystals, crystal binding, elastic waves and lattice vibrations, thermal properties, the free electron model of solids, and band theory and its applications. (This course is restricted to MSENG-MS Major students.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
MTSE-704
Theoretical Methods in Materials Science and Engineering
This course includes the treatment of vector analysis, special functions, waves, and fields; Maxwell Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac distributions, and their applications. Selected topics of interest in electrodynamics, fluid mechanics, and statistical mechanics will also be discussed. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
MTSE-780
Theory of Microsensors and Actuators
This course introduces the theory and development of sensors at the molecular and ionic levels. Mechanism details for operation of the sensors and actuators will be discussed. Fundamental aspects related to chemical, biochemical, piezoresistive, magnetic, thermal, and luminescent sensors will be discussed with an emphasis on the development of innovative products. Control systems based on ion selectivity for biomedical applications will be covered in detail. Neurotransmitters, neural network, and directional selectivity using conducting polymers will also be covered. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
MTSE-799
Independent Study
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for a masters-level student. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the department offering the course.) Ind Study (Fall, Spring, Summer).
PHYS-611
Classical Electrodynamics I
This course is a systematic treatment of electro- and magneto-statics, charges, currents, fields and potentials, dielectrics and magnetic materials, Maxwell's equations and electromagnetic waves. Field theory is treated in terms of scalar and vector potentials. Wave solutions of Maxwell's equations, the behavior of electromagnetic waves at interfaces, guided electromagnetic waves, and simple radiating systems will be covered. (Prerequisites: PHYS-412 or equivalent course or Graduate standing.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
PHYS-612
Classical Electrodynamics II
This course is an advanced treatment of electrodynamics and radiation. Classical scattering theory including Mie scattering, Rayleigh scattering, and the Born approximation will be covered. Relativistic electrodynamics will be applied to charged particles in electromagnetic fields and magnetohydrodynamics. (Prerequisites: PHYS-611 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
STAT-621
Statistical Quality Control
A practical course designed to provide in-depth understanding of the principles and practices of statistical process control, process capability, and acceptance sampling. Topics include: statistical concepts relating to processes, Shewhart charts for attribute and variables data, CUSUM charts, EWMA charts, process capability studies, attribute and variables acceptance sampling techniques. (This class is restricted to students in the APPSTAT-MS, SMPPI-ACT, STATQL-ACT or MMSI-MS programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
STAT-641
Applied Linear Models - Regression
A course that studies how a response variable is related to a set of predictor variables. Regression techniques provide a foundation for the analysis of observational data and provide insight into the analysis of data from designed experiments. Topics include happenstance data versus designed experiments, simple linear regression, the matrix approach to simple and multiple linear regression, analysis of residuals, transformations, weighted least squares, polynomial models, influence diagnostics, dummy variables, selection of best linear models, nonlinear estimation, and model building. (This course is restricted to students in APPSTAT-MS or SMPPI-ACT.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
STAT-642
Applied Linear Models - ANOVA
This course introduces students to analysis of models with categorical factors, with emphasis on interpretation. Topics include the role of statistics in scientific studies, fixed and random effects, mixed models, covariates, hierarchical models, and repeated measures. (This class is restricted to students in the APPSTAT-MS, SMPPI-ACT, STATQL-ACT or MMSI-MS programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
STAT-670
Design of Experiments
How to design and analyze experiments, with an emphasis on applications in engineering and the physical sciences. Topics include the role of statistics in scientific experimentation; general principles of design, including randomization, replication, and blocking; replicated and unreplicated two-level factorial designs; two-level fractional-factorial designs; response surface designs. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
TCET-740
Fiber Optic Communications
Fiber-optic, point-to-point telecommunication systems are used as a framework to understand the wide array of fiber-optic telecom technologies, including light sources, optical fiber, and photoreceivers. An emphasis on the nature & behavior of optical signals provides insight into these technologies and into the important fiber-channel impairments of attenuation and dispersion. Fundamental concepts and state-of-the-art advances of these technologies are covered, as well as component-level and system-level analysis. Lecture 2 (Fall).
TCOM-621
Proposal Writing
This course focuses on reviewing examples of the elements of proposal responses and practicing creating those elements. Students learn the process of evaluating and responding to RFIs and RFPs with concentration on making bid decisions, organizing teams, identifying strategies, establishing credibility, ensuring technical clarity, taking advantage of technology, applying creativity, and writing persuasively. Topics include the proposal process that is practiced by government, industry, and grant-funding agencies.*Note: co-listed with TCOM-514.* Lecture 3 (Spring).
For the courses below: Thesis option can include up to two (2); Project option can include up to four (4)
ACCT-603
Accounting for Decision Makers
A graduate-level introduction to the use of accounting information by decision makers. The focus of the course is on two subject areas: (1) financial reporting concepts/issues and the use of general-purpose financial statements by internal and external decision makers and (2) the development and use of special-purpose financial information intended to assist managers in planning and controlling an organization's activities. Generally accepted accounting principles and issues related to International Financial Reporting Standards are considered while studying the first subject area and ethical issues impacting accounting are considered throughout. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
ACCT-706
Cost Management
The development and use of cost data for external reporting and internal cost management (planning and control). Topics include job costing, process costing, joint product costing, cost reassignments, standard costs, activity-based costing, decentralization and transfer pricing, and cost variances. Consideration is given to manufacturing, service and retail organizations. (Prerequisites: ACCT-603 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
BLEG-745
Legal and Ethical Issues in Technology-intensive Environments
The course confronts graduate students with a wide variety of legal and ethical issues in organizational environments that are technologically intensive, such as information technology and the life sciences. Impacts of intellectual property legislation and legal cases in national and international venues are investigated. Legal and social issues involving individual privacy are argued. This exposure to legal and ethical dilemmas is an important tool as the graduates encounters such situations throughout their careers. Coupled with technical proficiency, the ability to deal with legal and ethical issues shapes professional successes and failures. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
BUSI-710
Project Management
This course addresses project management from a multidisciplinary perspective, covering the fundamental nature of and techniques for managing a broad range of projects. Topics cover the Project Management Life Cycle from Planning to Termination. It also addresses the behavioral and quantitative facets of project management, as well as the use of methods, tools and techniques for the initiation, planning, and execution of projects. Introduces the standard framework, processes and knowledge areas of the Project Management Institute. *Note: Bachelors degree or minimum of 5 years of work experience in a project related business environment. Recommended education or work experience in organizational behavior, mathematics and basic accounting. *Note: BUSI-510 may not be substituted for BUSI-710 in a graduate concentration or the advanced certificate in project management. Additionally, a student may not register for and receive credit for both BUSI-510 and BUSI-710, whether taken as an undergraduate or graduate student. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
BUSI-711
Advanced Project Management
Advanced Project Management covers the topics necessary for implementation of and excellence in project management. It deals with turning the principles and theory of project management into practice. The course addresses the best practices for project management in the world; project portfolio management and ROI; the project office and Six Sigma; project risk management and integrated projects; corporate cultures, behavior, and cultural failures; informal, adaptive, and extreme project management; and critical chain project management. Integrates aspects of the framework, processes and knowledge areas of the Project Management Institute. *Note: Advanced Project Management is available in on-campus and online formats. (Prerequisite: (BUSI-710 or DECS-744 or ISEE-750) or BUSI-714 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
BUSI-712
International Project Management
With the increasing frequency of globalization, mergers, and acquisitions, international projects are becoming more prevalent and approaching the norm for many organizations. This course addresses a wide range of international projects—based in different industries and multiple countries. It deals with cultural and social differences within firms; cultural and social differences among countries and within countries; languages and dialect variations; different management practices and structures; religious practices; legal, regulatory, and reporting requirements; technology and infrastructure differences in different regions; and time zone differences. Incorporates aspects of the framework, processes and knowledge areas of the Project Management Institute. (Prerequisite: BUSI-710 or BUSI-711 or BUSI-714 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
DECS-744
Project Management
A study in the principles of project management and the application of various tools and techniques for project planning and control. This course focuses on the leadership role of the project manager, and the roles and responsibilities of the team members. Considerable emphasis is placed on statements of work and work breakdown structures. The course uses a combination of lecture/discussion, group exercises, and case studies. (This class is restricted to degree-seeking graduate students or those with permission from instructor.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
INTB-730
Cross-Cultural Management
An analysis of comparative global business behavior and organization with particular emphasis on values, authority, individual and group relations, labor-management ties, risk tolerance, and motivational techniques. The course will prepare students to recognize different values and cultural factors in the global business community and how these shape and determine appropriate management behavior. The problems and opportunities of transferring management practices from one culture to another will also be examined. Lecture .
ISEE-750
Systems and Project Management
Systems and Project Management ensures progress toward objectives, proper deployment and conservation of human and financial resources, and achievement of cost and schedule targets. The focus of the course is on the utilization of a diverse set of project management methods and tools. Topics include strategic project management, project and organization learning, cost, schedule planning and control, structuring of performance measures and metrics, technical teams and project management, information technology support of teams, risk management, and process control. Course delivery consists of lectures, speakers, case studies, and experience sharing, and reinforces collaborative project-based learning and continuous improvement. (Prerequisites: ISEE-350 or equivalent course or graduate standing in ISEE BS/MS, ISEE BS/ME, ISEE-MS, ISEE-ME, SUSTAIN-MS, SUSTAIN-ME, ENGMGT-ME, PRODDEV-MS or MFLEAD-MS programs.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
MGMT-740
Leading Teams in Organizations
This course examines why people behave as they do in organizations and what managers can do to improve organizational performance by influencing people's behavior. Students will learn a number of frameworks for diagnosing and dealing with managerial challenges dynamics at the individual, group and organizational level. Topics include leadership, motivation, team building, conflict, organizational change, cultures, decision making, and ethical leadership. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring, Summer).
MGMT-742
Technology Management
This course is an introduction to the technological process in organizations and the factors, both internal and external, which influence the rate, timing and success of industrial innovations. The interrelationship between science and technology and the importance of these two disciplines to the process of technological innovation is examined. Also discussed is the process of R&D management, the strategic management of technology, the dynamics of technology life cycles and organizational influences on engineering and manufacturing processes. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
MGMT-761
Managing Research and Innovation
This course deals with the responsibilities and operating problems of managers responsible for research and innovation within firms. Topics will include: internal technology assessments, the acquisition of technology, domestic and international technology transfer, and the selection and management of research and development projects. Managerial techniques for stimulating and managing innovation are discussed, based on descriptive and prescriptive readings and cases. Particular attention will be given to managing creative individuals, the nature of disruptive technical innovations, and techniques for overcoming barriers to innovation. (Prerequisites: MGMT-742 or MGMT-735 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
MGMT-762
Managing New Process and Product Development
The course deals with the internal organizational challenges faced by managers of innovative and technology-intensive companies. Particular attention is given to management techniques for successfully developing and introducing into the marketplace new products and services. Also discussed are the management of technical groups and project teams, cross-functional integration, and organizational processes and procedures that support innovation and creativity. (Prerequisites: MGMT-742 or MGMT-735 or equivalent courses.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
SERQ-712
Breakthrough Thinking, Creativity, and Innovation
This is an introductory-level survey course on the dynamics of innovation. The course focuses on individual, team and organization-human and systems dynamics that impact organizational innovation. Students gain awareness in, understanding of and important skills in fostering multi-level organizational human ecologies conducive to the creation of innovation. Issues and challenges important to leaders at all levels in an organization, entrepreneurs and talent management practitioners will be examined and explored. There is a required fee for the class to pay for the administration of the ISPI and Meyers Briggs evaluation instruments. Students will develop in their understanding of innovation, their own personal innovation capabilities, preferences, and the human dynamics unique to innovation applied in an organizational context. This background is becoming increasingly critical to developing innovation capabilities in and across organizations in our increasingly competitive and complex world. This course will build awareness and improve competency in the application of overall course content and design principles particular to developing innovation-competent individuals, teams, and organizations. Lecture 3 (Fall, Summer).

* Additional approved electives comprise graduate courses offered by programs in the College of Science, Kate Gleason College of Engineering, College of Engineering Technology, Golisano Institute for Sustainability, School of Individualized Studies, and the Saunders College of Business. Prerequisites for all approved electives include Graduate Standing and may require permission of instructor.

Admission Requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS program in materials science and engineering, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

  • Complete an online graduate application. Refer to Graduate Admission Deadlines and Requirements for information on application deadlines, entry terms, and more.
  • Submit copies of official transcript(s) (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work, including any transfer credit earned.
  • Hold a baccalaureate degree (or US equivalent) from an accredited university or college in chemistry, physics, chemical engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, or a related field.
  • Recommended minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (or equivalent).
  • Submit a current resume or curriculum vitae.
  • Two letters of recommendation are required. Refer to Application Instructions and Requirements for additional information.
  • Not all programs require the submission of scores from entrance exams (GMAT or GRE). Please refer to the Graduate Admission Deadlines and Requirements page for more information.
  • Submit a personal statement of educational objectives. Refer to Application Instructions and Requirements for additional information.
  • International applicants whose native language is not English must submit official test scores from the TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE. Students below the minimum requirement may be considered for conditional admission. Refer to Graduate Admission Deadlines and Requirements for additional information on English requirements. International applicants may be considered for an English test requirement waiver. Refer to Additional Requirements for International Applicants to review waiver eligibility.

Candidates not meeting the general requirements may petition for admission to the program. In such cases, it may be suggested that the necessary background courses be taken at the undergraduate level. However, undergraduate credits that make up deficiencies may not be counted toward the master’s degree.

Any student who wishes to study at the graduate level must first be admitted to the program. However, an applicant may be permitted to take graduate courses as a nonmatriculated student if they meet the general requirements mentioned above.

Learn about admissions, cost, and financial aid 

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